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Author Topic: Moving Hives Cross State - Suggestions?  (Read 1975 times)
Anonymous
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« on: September 16, 2005, 04:21:18 PM »

I'm one of those persons that lies awake at night and tries to visualize an entire process from start to finish.  Helps me put together to-do and shopping lists.   rolleyes

Here's what's up for probably next weekend.  Got an e-mail from a guy who wants to reduce his hives and has 30 some to sell.  I plan to buy 15 and place them on a piece of property near my house.  I figure we'll start sometime after sundown, screen up the entrance and inner cover hole.  Then staple the hive bodies (two deeps) together along with the bottom board.  Then load them in a small U-haul and head to the new location.  If you've done this before, I'd greatly appreciate any input you might have.

Thanks!
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stilllearning
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« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2005, 05:16:17 PM »

BEE SURE THAT THERE IS VENTELATION IN THAT UHAUL TRAILER , DON T USE A CLOSED IN ONE AND BEE SURE EXHAUST FUMES FROM WHAT YOU PULL IT WITH DONT GET TO THE BEES, IT WILL KILL THEM
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Wayne Cole
Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2005, 05:26:54 PM »

That's a pretty good synopsis.  It leaves out where the hive tips over and the bees all pour out, but other than that...

I'd leave the back door to the UHaul open a bit for air.  More if it's hot.
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Michael Bush
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2005, 05:27:26 PM »

I have used screen bottoms, a top with a hole in it. Duct taped it all together and hauled in my Durango.

Have stapled with screened bottoms and/or screened entrances and hauled on open trailer and in the back of pick/up.

No problems except....... Make sure all holes are closed that bees can get through. Most will say they can't but I swear I had bees squeezing out a 1/16 slot. And make sure any lid is nailed down good.

OH and remember the frames could rock around as you stop, take off, turn corners, or bumpy roads. If they are not stuck together really good, you can wedge wads of newspaper between the top bar and the hive wall.
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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Anonymous
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« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2005, 06:56:36 PM »

Quote from: Michael Bush
That's a pretty good synopsis.  It leaves out where the hive tips over and the bees all pour out, but other than that...


LOL!  Now tonight I'll have nightmares for sure!   cheesy
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Anonymous
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« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2005, 07:01:08 PM »

Good point about leaving the door cracked.  I was going to use a flatbed, but I was afraid it might be too cool and chill the bees enroute.  Temps been down around 59 at night here...
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2005, 07:27:19 PM »

My bees go out flying in 45 degree weather. Probably won't be a problem.
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thegolfpsycho
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« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2005, 08:12:40 PM »

One thing I have done over the years to help "keep" things together, is to buy some furring strips, and some wood screws.  Wood screw the firring strips into the bottom, each box, and both covers if I haven't  removed the tops in leiu of screens.  Keeps things pretty solidly together.  Obviously, if only moving them across a lot or property, I don't usually go that trouble, but sometimes wish I had.
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Anonymous
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« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2005, 08:29:41 PM »

Quote from: Jerrymac
My bees go out flying in 45 degree weather. Probably won't be a problem.


Hmm.  Maybe I am being overly cautious.  I certainly wouldn't want 15 hives to suffocate in the back of a box truck.

I'll mull it over again tonight.  Still got a week to make a decision.  Tomorrow morning I go to give the bees a quick looking over.  I'll know more about the condition of the wooden ware after that.

Apparently these hives have telescoping covers.  My thought was to leave these off and screen over the inner cover hole.  That way I could butt them up flush against each other in a row and run a long ratcheting strap over them to keep from tipping.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2005, 08:50:50 AM »

Even if it's below freezing, I'd leave the door open a crack.  Check them on occasion and make sure they aren't too frantic.  If they are frantic, open the door some more to let in more air and keep going.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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Anonymous
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« Reply #10 on: September 17, 2005, 09:37:17 AM »

Well, good morning!  No nightmares last night, but I've re-thought my trailer scheme.  I'm going to look into an open flatbed trailer.  I'm going to rent a pick-up to pull it, too, since my 4 cyl Toyota is showing it's age.

I'll be leaving here in 30 minutes to see the hives.  Unfortunately, it's rainy and overcast.  Not a good day to open hives...   Sad

The county bee inspector and I are trading phone messages.  He said he could meet me to do a formal inspection later this week.  This is a good idea.  His one message said that the only problem he's seen with these hives was in June.  That was the last time he inspected and only saw a few instances of chalk brood.

I'll try to post later.
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