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Author Topic: How long do I have to wait?  (Read 458 times)
robthir
New Bee
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Location: Prospect, VA


« on: June 03, 2012, 06:15:54 PM »

New beek  here.  I got two strong hives from a friend and I have two nucs that I've had for a couple of weeks.  The weaker of my established hives appears to be quite aggressive recently(first couple of months were fine), so I plan to re-queen in a little while.  There is some brood still, but from what I've read, re-queening might be the answer.  However, while checking honey supers on the other colony, I dropped a super and really made those bees angry.  I got one sting and they really got on me.  I quickly put it back together and retreated into the woods to shake off the followers.  I went into the house, showered, washed my stuff and dried it.  I went back out to the hive and I used cool smoke to the front of the hive and waited a few, then I cracked the top super and smoked a bit.  When I lifted up the top super, those bees came rushing out like they were going to kill me and about 8 bees immediately started stinging my gloves.  Again, I closed up the hive and retreated to the woods.  So, my question is, how long after really pissing off the bees should I wait to go back in?  A day, a week?  Clearly, we have learned that two hours isn't enough time. I've been in there plenty, the weather conditions were okay, maybe slightly breezy, I've never had them come after me like that though, let alone twice.  What am I doing wrong here?
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AllenF
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Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2012, 07:43:44 PM »

I would give them a day or two.  There is a reason they felt ill against you.   Maybe they have been getting picked on by the stronger hives and have become defensive.   Who knows.   But I have had some of the nicest have run me back to the house and then a week later, back to nice.   Never rush to kill the queen, but never put up with a hot hive either.   
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Sparky
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« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2012, 07:48:12 PM »

Do you know what the queen pattern is like ? If you do and have no good reason to open it up, i would let it closed up for a week then go into it. If you need to look in on her to see how things are going, try to let it settle down for a few days and blow some smoke under the top also and close it for at least 30 seconds or so before going in. Pick a day that is calm and sunny and not to late in the day to try again.
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Joe D
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« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2012, 10:38:46 PM »


I have some that were a little fussy, I always wear protective gear,now, blow a little smoke in the entance and some under the top.  When you go to look below the top super blow a little more, move it and hit the box that is now on top with a puff.  Now my fussy hive swarmed, I caught them.  Put them in a box, a few days latter the old queen died, then requeened.  I have only been buzzed by 1 bee since they swarmed.  Oh,when mine were fussy I didn't go back for at least a couple of days.  Good luck with your bees.

Joe
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kathyp
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« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2012, 10:47:06 PM »

Quote
I dropped a super and really made those bees angry

 grin

i'd wait a couple of days.
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