Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
September 21, 2014, 10:51:54 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Winter insulation  (Read 5934 times)
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2005, 11:28:05 PM »

Quote from: Kris^


Our winter winds tend to come from the north.  For instance, the northern interior of our home is often colder than the rest of the house.


Surely it does because sun is on opposite side. But the hive radiates warm outside from it's all parts. And the night is mostly cold. At spring the difference between minimum and maximum may be 15-20C.

Winter comes from north? Nver heard. It comes because globe runs round the sun in such an position.


The measure of radiation of the sum makes winter and summer.



When we have insulation regulation to homes and buildings, surely they not have different thicknes to diffrenet side walls. The very important direction is the ceiling, because warm air rise upp.

Quote


The sugar board, a solid block of sugar candy, was mainly insurance that there would be food for them if they ran out of stores in early spring.


That kind of food is the worst you can give to bees. It makes them dirsty.

I have long winter. I give sugar solution to 2 box hive 18 liters. In March bee makes their cleansing flight and soon I tseck do they have weight= sugar left. If not, I give capped frames from other hives.

If you have in home yard hives, you can give them 10 liters sugar liquid.

In Finland many use dry sugar at spring but I do not know why.

I still repeat what I have said many times.

there is no sence to

1) feed nucs or hives at summer all the time, because it fills little hive and queen cannot lay eggs enough.

2) feed all the winter. No sence. Bees do not die if you give at autum food proper measure.

If you have snow and cold winter, why don't you use insulated hives. It saves food 30% during winter and speed upp spring development really well.
Logged
bassman1977
"King Bee"
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1787

Location: Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania


« Reply #21 on: September 29, 2005, 08:10:47 PM »

I made a vent similar to what Archie suggested.  I built a frame about 2 inches tall (it's what I had laying around) and drilled holes all around it.  I then took aluminum mesh screen and stapled it about 1/4 inch below the air holes.  I hope it works as planned.  It fit loose on top of the inner cover so I got a strap and tied the whole hive together.  Bees are still able to get up into it because the slot is open in the inner cover.  I don't see this to be a problem.  I hope not anyway.  Pray for my bees this winter.   Tongue
Logged

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(''')_(''')
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13663


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #22 on: September 30, 2005, 10:47:39 AM »

An upper entrance in the winter is always a good thing.  It means a pile of dead bees won't trap them.  A foot of snow on the ground won't trap them.  And it means some more of the wet air can get out.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #23 on: October 02, 2005, 04:24:19 PM »

Quote from: Michael Bush
An upper entrance in the winter is always a good thing.  It means a pile of dead bees won't trap them. .


Yes, this is important!

Also open space between lower entrance and snow is important. If snow is wet and hive is inside snow, nosema will kill more bees than without snow.
Logged
ApisM
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 44


Location: Red Lake, Ontario


« Reply #24 on: October 13, 2005, 11:33:08 PM »

I manage to get my colonies through extended periods of -40 F.  I insulate with styrofoam and drill a 3/8 inch hole in the top super.  Moisture is the killer, not cold!
Logged

It is easier to catch flies with honey than with vinegar
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #25 on: October 14, 2005, 01:23:01 AM »

Quote from: ApisM
I manage to get my colonies through extended periods of -40 F.  I insulate with styrofoam and drill a 3/8 inch hole in the top super.  Moisture is the killer, not cold!


We have talken too little about insulation. Cold does not kill if hive has enough food but insulation is value of gold because in warm hives colony developes at spring more quickly and is able to catch honey earlier.

I have noticed truly when I start to warm upp hives with terrarium heaters. And what is amazing, the biggest hives get best advantage from heating.
Logged
qa33010
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 912


Location: Arkansas, White County


« Reply #26 on: October 15, 2005, 04:56:04 AM »

Hi Finsky!

     Do you use a pad on the bottom or is it a tube set in the corner or a reflector type (old)that sits on top?

David
Logged

Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
manowar422
Guest
« Reply #27 on: October 15, 2005, 11:06:22 AM »

David,
This post will give you some info.

http://beemaster.com/beebbs/viewtopic.php?t=3141&highlight=heater
Logged
qa33010
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 912


Location: Arkansas, White County


« Reply #28 on: October 16, 2005, 05:16:46 AM »

Thanks manowar422!!!

    I don't need it here, but IF I move back up north with the family It's nice to have info available.

David
Logged

Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.277 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page September 19, 2014, 10:30:27 AM
anything