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Author Topic: zan  (Read 1836 times)

Offline zan

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zan
« on: August 31, 2005, 08:20:20 AM »
Hi everyone.

I am a new beekeeper (second year) in Croatia.

Started last year with 1 hive and made 1 this year but  I loose 3 swarm ( maybe more ). .
I get only 17 kilo honey this year.

manowar422

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zan
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2005, 11:21:30 PM »
:) Welcome to the forum :)

Learn to use the great search feature on this forum
and study the all posts about swarms. Winter is an
excellent time to study while your bees hybernate.

David

Offline Joseph Clemens

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Welcome
« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2005, 11:54:30 PM »
Welcome,
Good start.


----

BTW, honeybees don't "hibernate".

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Joseph Clemens
Beekeeping since 1964
10+ years in Tucson, Arizona
12+ hives and 15+ nucs
No chemicals -- no treatments of any kind, EVER.

manowar422

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zan
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2005, 12:28:03 AM »
Joseph is exactly right about the technical meaning of the word having
nothing to do with the honey bees, but if you laid around all winter and
did nothing but eat & keep warm, must folks would say you were HIBERNATING. :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:

“bees reared late in the fall usually live until spring, since they have little to do in the winter except
eat and keep warm. Unlike other species of bees, honey bees do not hibernate; the colony survives
the winter as a group of active adult bees.”
http://www.everythingabout.net/articles/biology/animals/arthropods/insects/bees/honey_bee/

Offline Joseph Clemens

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Honeybee Winter activities
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2005, 03:01:18 AM »
Around here they continue their same activities almost year-round. I've even seen swarms in January the past two years. When our winters are wet, sometimes it happens -- though not often enough, there are moderate honey flows all winter long -- good enough that their populations peak (hives overflowing with bees) just before spring when the major honeyflows begin.

<img src="http://banners.wunderground.com/weathersticker/miniWeather06_both/language/www/US/AZ/Marana.gif" border=0
alt="Click for Marana, Arizona Forecast" height=50 width=150>

Joseph Clemens
Beekeeping since 1964
10+ years in Tucson, Arizona
12+ hives and 15+ nucs
No chemicals -- no treatments of any kind, EVER.

Offline zan

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zan
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2005, 07:34:30 AM »
In the spring I fed them to become strong, like I red  but then they have swarm.

 

anything