Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 27, 2014, 10:50:52 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Think I goofed  (Read 1012 times)
RZRBCK BEE
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 89

Location: Bono, Arkansas


« on: April 26, 2012, 09:29:31 AM »

My best hive, a 4 year survivor hive with no treatment and my best honey producer, had 9 or 10 swarm cells. I took the queen, a frame of pollen, frame of honey and 3 frames of bees and moved to a nuc. Left the swarm cells in the original hive with the exception of one cell that was on a frame that went into the nuc. I figured the bees would tear it down and wouldnt be a problem. After a week I noticed most of the brood had hatched and no new eggs or larva and the queen cell open. So am I to assume they offed my good queen that I wanted to keep and now they have a virgin? Should I have destroyed that queen cell?

Thanks
Randy
Logged
sawdstmakr
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3334


Location: Jacksonville FL


« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2012, 10:03:01 AM »

I would not have destroyed it. A may have hurt during transition. You still have a good q that will be laying in a week or so.
Jim
Logged

"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain
AliciaH
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 762


Location: Enumclaw Plateau, WA


« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2012, 10:32:42 AM »

Randy:  So when you reinspected, you did not see the queen?  Are you sure she's not there?

Others:  Is it possible his queen stopped laying as part of the transition to the new nuc? Or if the swarm cell is still there, she stopped laying and the bees still plan on swarming from the nuc?
Logged
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15331


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2012, 11:02:47 AM »

when did you do this?  if it's been in the last couple of weeks, give it another week or so.  she might have been damaged...or even returned to the first hive.  had that happen once when the nuc and old hive were next to each other.  didn't even know they would do that.  check the old hive. 

  a good queen does not last forever and a new queen from the same stock might be even better.  hardest lesson for me was to learn that i damaged more hives with impatience were hurt by mites, disease, or anything else.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
RZRBCK BEE
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 89

Location: Bono, Arkansas


« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2012, 12:48:46 PM »

Queen was there 2 days ago but couldnt find her yesterday. Queen cell was opened perfectly and it wasnt destroyed like I thought they would do.
Logged
annette
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5317


Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2012, 12:59:17 PM »

Just did a split a few weeks ago. Took the old queen (she was marked) and placed her into the split with 1 good queen cell. Figured if they want to replace her, they will. Checked on them and found a new virgin queen and no site of the old queen.

I feel good about it, as the old queen was 2 years old.

Logged
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15331


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2012, 01:04:38 PM »

it can take a couple of weeks for a new queen to get mated and start laying.  wait for it, but keep an eye on them.  sometimes the new queen doesn't make it back.  if you have doubts in a bit, put a frame of eggs in the hive.  if there is no queen, they will start queen cells again.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
RZRBCK BEE
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 89

Location: Bono, Arkansas


« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2012, 01:23:05 PM »

Annette, guess they didn't like the old but I sure did. I guess they know better than I do so I'm gonna trust them. Appreciate ya'lls input.
Logged
AndrewT
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 93


Location: Central Indiana


« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2012, 06:35:28 PM »

I always set my old queen aside in a small nuc with just a couple of frames of brood and maybe some sealed honey.  That way, if your bees don't end up with a laying queen for whatever reason, you can always re-introduce her, or you can keep putting a frame with her eggs in another hive so they can try again.

Years ago, I had only one hive and hadn't been paying enough attention to it.  I finally got into it and found it full of bees, with lots of nectar in the brood nest, no open brood, and queen cells all over.  I knew they'd probably swarm no matter what I did, but I decided to split them anyway.  So, I split the hive as evenly as I could, brood, queen cells, honey, and put a new deep with empty comb and foundation on top of each.  After a few of days of rain, nothing had happened and I thought I was good, then on the next nice day, my kids told me that both hives had swarmed.  Inside both, there were not near as many bees and none of the queens looked like they had hatched yet.  I thought, "oh well, I won't get any honey, but at least I'll have two decent colonies with young queens.  Then after a couple more days, they both swarmed again. I got into them and in one of them I saw a virgin queen crawling around on a comb, piping loudly.  It was the first time I'd heard that and it was pretty cool.  I found one of the after-swarms in a bush nearby, and I just collected them in a box and took the cover off one of the hives, pulled out a couple of the frames and dumped them all in.  The next day there was a dead queen in front of that hive. 
Logged

Give a man a fish and he will have dinner.  Teach a man to fish and he will be late for dinner.
annette
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5317


Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2012, 07:59:36 PM »

it can take a couple of weeks for a new queen to get mated and start laying.  wait for it, but keep an eye on them.  sometimes the new queen doesn't make it back.  if you have doubts in a bit, put a frame of eggs in the hive.  if there is no queen, they will start queen cells again.

Yes, good idea Kathy!!
Logged
annette
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5317


Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2012, 08:01:02 PM »

I always set my old queen aside in a small nuc with just a couple of frames of brood and maybe some sealed honey.  That way, if your bees don't end up with a laying queen for whatever reason, you can always re-introduce her, or you can keep putting a frame with her eggs in another hive so they can try again.

I actually wondered about placing that queen cell in with the old queen. I like the idea of the nuc as you have mentioned.
Logged
RZRBCK BEE
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 89

Location: Bono, Arkansas


« Reply #11 on: April 27, 2012, 06:48:57 PM »

I want to thank all of you for giving me patience. I found the virgin queen this afternoon and she's not laying yet but I'm going to give her time. Thanks again.
Logged
FRAMEshift
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1681


Location: North Carolina


« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2012, 09:02:36 PM »

Those could have been supercedure cells.  Maybe the queen was already scheduled for the glue factory.... in which case, you saved the nuc by including a queen cell.  You are checking the hive a bit too frequently it seems to me.  Give the bees a break and I'll bet you'll feel calmer too.   grin
Logged

"You never can tell with bees."  --  Winnie-the-Pooh
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.186 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page December 18, 2014, 03:03:32 PM