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Author Topic: Fibre Glass Resin  (Read 3485 times)

Offline Cheech

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Fibre Glass Resin
« on: April 14, 2012, 03:47:09 PM »
has anyone used fibre glass resin to paint the outside of their boxes?
seems to me to be perfect if its not toxic

Offline DoctorZ

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2012, 03:55:48 PM »
I have not tried it on hives, but my experience with fibre glass is that it won't last long outside. Becomes brittle with age. I think that UV get at it.

Best of luck, though.

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Offline BlueBee

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2012, 04:28:34 PM »
I believe Derkem in the UK uses fiberglass over his polyurethane hives.  Resin and glass fiber than is.  He might have some insight.  Isn’t fiberglass resin pretty expensive relative to paint? 

Offline Cheech

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2012, 06:43:30 PM »
I have not tried it on hives, but my experience with fibre glass is that it won't last long outside. Becomes brittle with age. I think that UV get at it.

Best of luck, though.

I believe Derkem in the UK uses fiberglass over his polyurethane hives.  Resin and glass fiber than is.  He might have some insight.  Isn’t fiberglass resin pretty expensive relative to paint? 

here in Ja, the small fishermen make their own boats and coat it with fibreglass, it seems to hold up pretty good. maybe painting the boats helps with uv protection.
people that live near the sea also use the resin to coat their metal grill work instead of metal primer.  they say it protects the metal allot better.
the price for resin with hardener here is about 10% more expensive than our best brand oil paint.
i would love to experiment with it, but am worried about its toxicity potencial

Offline The Bix

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2012, 08:04:53 PM »
Cheech,

I have a fairly significant experience (hobby-wise) with fiberglass resin...as I understand it there are two types: polyester and epoxy.  And, if I understand your question, you are not asking about actual fiberglassing the outside of your hives with fiberglass cloth or some other composite structure, just painting them with the resin.  Right?  If so, I think it's a good idea.

I have played with both polyester resin and epoxy resin in my other hobby.  Polyester resin stinks something awful...my kids complained about it for weeks after I made a few things with it in the garage.  I wouldn't use it on beehives.  On the other hand, epoxy is much easier to work with, doesn't stink and I think it would seal up the outside of your hives beautifully, they will last a long time in my opinion.  Painting the exposed end grain on your boxes with epoxy resin will seal it up and protect it very well and probably extend its life.  BTW, I'm not talking about the cheap 5 minute or 30  minute "epoxy" you buy at Home Depot, I'm talking about the real stuff that the fisherman probably use to FG their boats.

I think that there are a few non-toxic epoxy resins out there.  I have used West Systems epoxy (used primarily in marine applications) extensively and like it very much.  Whatever you choose to do, before you buy something, check the Material Safety Data Sheet for the details and make an informed decision.

Offline affreux

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2012, 09:30:08 PM »
If you don't paint it it will crack in a year.

Offline Beregondo

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2012, 12:58:23 AM »
 A little poking around at duckworksmagazine .com will tell you quite a bit about epoxy resin and wood. look at the boat build articles.
Epoxy on wood is widely used to build boats.
 If left unpainted it is recommended to use a coat of varnish every year or three for UV protection...but the epoxy will seal the wood VERY well.

Offline Cheech

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2012, 11:39:43 AM »
if I understand your question, you are not asking about actual fiberglassing the outside of your hives with fiberglass cloth or some other composite structure, just painting them with the resin.  Right?  If so, I think it's a good idea.

epoxy is much easier to work with, doesn't stink and I think it would seal up the outside of your hives beautifully, they will last a long time in my opinion.  Painting the exposed end grain on your boxes with epoxy resin will seal it up and protect it very well and probably extend its life. 

Bix, you are correct, i just want to paint with the resin and have it soak into the wood to seal and protect.
not really interested in creating a layer of resin on top of the wood.
I'm not sure what type of resin we have here, it has the consistency and look of polyurethane, but a bit darker in colour. it does have a smell but i'm not sure if i would say it's overwhelming but you have to use it outside or well ventilated indoors.  the hardener is a clear liquid like water.

If you don't paint it it will crack in a year.

affreux, i figure if i just use it to soak into the wood and not create a film on top of the wood, then cracking wont be much of a problem, on the other hand if it actually seals the wood fibres and i do paint more to creat a film on top, if it cracks then that may not be much of a problem.

Epoxy on wood is widely used to build boats.
 If left unpainted it is recommended to use a coat of varnish every year or three for UV protection...but the epoxy will seal the wood VERY well.

Berengondo, this is my thinking also, but i'm not thinking to paint it after, just seal the wood to preserve.
I'm going to experiment with one box and see.
my main concern is, does the material will emit any toxic fumes or oils or such even after it has cured?

Offline The Bix

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2012, 04:50:28 PM »

I'm not sure what type of resin we have here, it has the consistency and look of polyurethane, but a bit darker in colour. it does have a smell but i'm not sure if i would say it's overwhelming but you have to use it outside or well ventilated indoors.  the hardener is a clear liquid like water.

That sounds like epoxy.  With polyester, the hardener is in a small tube and you only have to add a few drops and you have a very short amount of working time.  Do you know what the working time is with the stuff you have?

Offline JackM

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2012, 09:35:01 AM »
I would not use it as it does not allow moisture permeation out of the hive.    It is a perfect vapor barrier.  Exterior paints are designed to allow the moisture inside out, while keeping outside moisture out.  I hope I explained that right, I have a buddy that was once pres of one of the major paint companies and we discussed that very topic last spring.
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Offline AllenF

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2012, 10:02:33 AM »
Keep SBB open year  around to keep the air flowing in the hives.   But good point on moisture collecting in the hive.   I have but don't use a plastic hive that would rain down on the bees from the plastic inner cover. 

Offline The Bix

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2012, 10:30:27 AM »
I would not use it as it does not allow moisture permeation out of the hive.    It is a perfect vapor barrier. 

I doubt most hives are airtight where this would be a problem.  How much vapor actually escapes through the painted surfaces v. the cracks and small spaces between boxes?  I don't know, but it is best in my mind to have a well-ventilated hive.  If it is a problem though,  perhaps the best approach is to coat the exposed end grain with the epoxy and paint the rest?

Offline derekm

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2012, 12:25:31 PM »
Polyester is much cheaper than epoxy
Polyester smells more... (ester ... its in the name :) )
The cure time for epoxy or polyester can be minutes or days depending on the resin /hardener combo.
Bees do not eat through either when coated on soft foam. but make sure you have a continous coat.
Does it bother the bees ... not enough info.
Two epoxy/polyester coated hives both came through winter , although one lost its queen,

As regards a vapour barrier ..yes. But do you want to steal both the heat and all the bees water, thats what a cold hive does, increasing the ventilation does both  faster. just a thought.
If they increased energy bill for your home by a factor of 4.5 would you consider that cruel? If so why are you doing that to your bees?

Offline Cheech

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2012, 11:46:52 AM »
Wow, some really great responses.
i just looked at the product label and it called STYPOL, unsaturated polyester
i guess that up north with cold weather, moisture problems is a concern, but here in Jamaica i have not heard other beeks complaining about it.  We are able to use SBB all year round, so plenty ventilation.

Offline divemaster1963

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Re: Fibre Glass Resin
« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2012, 02:17:33 AM »
I have  never used resin personally. I have learned over the years i worked my uncles 1000 hives on his farm. he wood thin the first coat of water base pain by at least half to make a wash. he would coat the outside liberally to soak the wood then give them a full straight coat. that way he could seal the surface to make then last longer. He would only recoat after 5 years and had 10+ year life on a box.
some times the old way works better than the new. and cost less to.


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