Welcome, Guest

Author Topic: AFB and EFB  (Read 1593 times)

Offline limyw

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 110
AFB and EFB
« on: August 22, 2005, 12:34:46 PM »
Bee deseases are the most frigtening to me, because never have experience to handle them. With my merely 1 year of beekeeping experience, I think if they occure a day, my hives would collapse. Here very rare people keep italian bee, so expertise is hardly find.

Anyone can suggest ideas to deal with these 2 deseases?
lyw

Offline Michael Bush

  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 14764
  • Gender: Male
    • bushfarms.com
AFB and EFB
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2005, 01:42:08 PM »
EFB I would do a break in the brood rearing.  Cage the queen for three weeks until all the brood emerges.

AFB is a tough one.  I've never had to deal with it, but burning the hive is typical.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline bill

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 207
AFB and EFB
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2005, 12:38:45 AM »
I would think that in a country where european bees are rare that the pathogens they are susceptible to would also be rare. I am assuming there are no wild european bees there either. but that is just a guess as I am not really that well Qualified to give advice but that is what came to mind. I guess if yours swarm there could be wild ones eventually
billiet

Offline TAH

  • New Bee
  • *
  • Posts: 27
AFB and EFB
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2005, 01:32:52 AM »
From things I have read it seems that some of the mites and diseases originated in Asia in the wild bees there.

Offline Michael Bush

  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 14764
  • Gender: Male
    • bushfarms.com
AFB and EFB
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2005, 10:35:17 AM »
If AFB is an obligate parasite of the honey bee, and as far as we know it is.  And if AFB orginated in the Americas, and as far was we know it did.  And EHB were not in the Americas, and as far as we know they weren't.  Then where did the AFB come from?
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline limyw

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 110
AFB and EFB
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2005, 10:55:59 AM »
I dont know much about how EFB and AFB come about. I only knew both are staburn deseases that many beekeeper afraid of.

I found recently there were some combs that shown big number of cells have death pupas, where worker bees were busy removing or eating them away. The death pupas looked clean, and found no mite. Hives found strong, honey and pollen supply were enough. So, I suspected they were attacked by EFB.

Within radius of 100km, there is no Italian beekeeper. So I dont think the desease (if there is) was brought by swarm hives.

I only noticed in the apiary where I got my nuc hives, over there have hives most likely attacked by AFB. The death larva appeared brownish, and body was curled. So far, my hives have no such problem.
lyw

Offline limyw

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 110
AFB and EFB
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2005, 10:56:17 AM »
I dont know much about how EFB and AFB come about. I only knew both are staburn deseases that many beekeeper afraid of.

I found recently there were some combs that shown big number of cells have death pupas, where worker bees were busy removing or eating them away. The death pupas looked clean, and found no mite. Hives found strong, honey and pollen supply were enough. So, I suspected they were attacked by EFB.

Within radius of 100km, there is no Italian beekeeper. So I dont think the desease (if there is) was brought by swarm hives.

I only noticed in the apiary where I got my nuc hives, over there have hives most likely attacked by AFB. The death larva appeared brownish, and body was curled. So far, my hives have no such problem.
lyw

Offline Michael Bush

  • Universal Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 14764
  • Gender: Male
    • bushfarms.com
AFB and EFB
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2005, 12:33:42 PM »
With AFB the larvae die after they are capped and usually after they start to pupate.  With EFB the larvae die before they are capped while they are still larvae.

Bees uncapping white otherwise healthy looking larvae is normal.  It is not a disease at all.  They are removing them either because they are doing something hygenic and there was something starting to go wrong and they caught it, or they are clearing out brood because there is a dearth and they don't want more mouths to feed.

Here are pictures of brood diseases:

http://www.kohala.net/bees/#anchor400987

Step through these and you'll see pictures of all sorts of brood diseases as well:

http://maarec.cas.psu.edu/pest&disease/slide10.htm
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen