Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 21, 2014, 10:48:54 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(1)  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Survivors in an oak tree...  (Read 2926 times)
Intheswamp
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1216

Location: South Central Alabama - Zone 8A


WWW
« on: March 25, 2012, 01:59:22 PM »

Here's a picture looking into a feral hive in an oak tree that I checked out yesterday.  The entrance is right at ground level and in deep shade...it is definitely a strong colony which probably explains it's longevity.  The owner says that they have been there 5+ years.  I hope to get a swarm trap deployed asap close to them.  They were very calm bees and *very* active!

Ed

Logged

rbinhood
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 278

Location: East Central Alabama


« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2012, 07:52:18 PM »

Looks like a good trapout to me!
Logged

Only God can make these two things.....Blood and Honey!
Intheswamp
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1216

Location: South Central Alabama - Zone 8A


WWW
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2012, 11:51:05 PM »

Looks like a good trapout to me!
Nah, they'll be good to keep the feral genes going.  The guy wants to keep them around.  Having been there for 5+ years I'm pretty much all for letting them stay there another 5+. Smiley   This colony is about a mile from me so my virgins have a good chance of picking up some genes from colony's drones.  Plus I've got permission to set up a trap. Wink

Ed
Logged

Intheswamp
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1216

Location: South Central Alabama - Zone 8A


WWW
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2012, 07:25:51 PM »

Well, here's a swarm trap I set out this morning.  Bees in the bee tree were working hot and heavy.  8-frame deep with medium frames.  Small cell starter strips that hang just below the first wire and are embedded.  1/2"x3" entrance.  About a 3/8" porch.  A little propolis smeared on the inside surfaces.  LGO as a bait lure.  About 400' from the bee tree.  We'll wait and see... Smiley  Ed







Logged

kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 14813


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2012, 07:36:41 PM »

that's a prize!!  be sure to keep swarm traps out there.  those trees often throw multiples.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8077

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2012, 08:19:08 PM »

I would also put a couple of traps closer to the tree on its side of the field.   I bet there are more bee trees in those woods there.
Logged
jmblakeney
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 483


Location: Anderson Co., Tennessee,

James


« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2012, 09:16:57 PM »

Great find!!! I agree with Allen F
I would also put a couple of traps closer to the tree on its side of the field.
Logged

"I believe the best social program is a job...." - Ronald Reagan
Intheswamp
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1216

Location: South Central Alabama - Zone 8A


WWW
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2012, 11:06:58 PM »

I feel really blessed to have a chance to work the area.  The only thing is that I basically have to come through the guy's yard and through his pasture for a good piece.  I'm afraid if I check the hives as much as I should that I might could wear out my welcome.  We've known each other for years and all that but if I start traveling over his pasture too much it's going to start marking a trail across it.  huh  And though I don't mind walking, there's a time issue involved, too.  I thought about putting another one on down the fence line.  The woods are really a narrow strip that runs along the branch...this is the headwaters of a branch that runs for several miles.

One thing I'm wondering about is the "2 feet or 2 miles" rule.  The feral colony is right at 1.25 miles from my house/beeyard.  If a swarm takes to the bait hive but I don't get to it for several days do you think they will have a problem orienting on the new location at my house?  I would be moving the bees to 8-frame medium boxes.  Would the move of 1.25 miles and switching boxes be enough to make them reorient?

Ed
Logged

danno
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2165


Location: Ludington, Michigan


« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2012, 08:09:25 AM »

If at all possible use prevailing wind to your advantage.  It will carry the sent along way.    My bee tree is dead again this spring.  They only make it through one winter and die the next.  By the end of may they will have a new colony and the 2 years will start again
Logged
backyard warrior
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 475

Location: NE PA


« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2012, 09:21:16 AM »

If they been there that long im impressed most of the time its just new colonies that die out and new ones move in.  Chris
Logged
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 14813


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2012, 09:34:48 AM »

if you set up multiple swarm traps you don't need to be checking them all the time.  the first swarm will probably be the biggest so plan for that, but have enough stuff out there so that you hopefully get what comes.  even if you were to only check every other week, it would be ok.  just take new stuff with you so that you only have to make one trip.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Intheswamp
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1216

Location: South Central Alabama - Zone 8A


WWW
« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2012, 10:27:08 PM »

danno, I've been thinking about the prevailing wind.  It comes from the southwest.  If you notice there is something in the southwest corner of the pasture...it is a feelot for the cows.  I don't want to get too close to that area, but I could still put a trap probably 200' to the west of the bee tree...that should leave a good bit of room between that trap and the feedlot.  I'm thinking of one there and maybe one on the east side of the bee tree in the corner where that line of trees juts out and runs along the pond.  That would give good coverage in three directions.

backyard warrior, I can't really say that it's the same colony that has been in the tree for 5+ years.  The property owner says they've been there for that long but it could be that different colonies have used the tree.  They seem to be pretty nice bees.  The owner said he's only been stung once when he was spraying the fence rows and accidentally hit them with the spray (might have been when he first found them?)...they weren't happy with him.  But other than that he says he's worked right beside them and never a problem.

kathyp, as you can see from my writing above I am thinking along your lines of a couple of more swarm traps. Smiley  I'll talk with the owner and be sure he doesn't mind, but I think he'll be fine with it...he did state he would like to get some honey from the bees but unless he cuts that big oak down he ain't getting any honey from them...unless, of course,  some of those bees are put to work in a Langstroth hive. Wink    So, you don't think in a two weeks time span a swarm would make too big of a mess in an 8-frame deep box with medium frames hanging in it?  I figure at the worst I'd probably have comb built off the bottoms of the frames that I'd need to rubberband into some empty frames.

Thanks for the feedback, ya'll!  Good food for thought!
Ed

P.S.  This is beginning to be more than just a photo thread...I wonder if it needs moving somewhere...Huh
Logged

danno
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2165


Location: Ludington, Michigan


« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2012, 08:49:11 AM »

another thing I like to do is leave the traps up until I see pollen coming in.  it means there is a queen right colony inside
Logged
Intheswamp
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1216

Location: South Central Alabama - Zone 8A


WWW
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2012, 10:14:08 AM »

Thanks for the pollen tip, danno.
Logged

kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 14813


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2012, 12:07:25 PM »

Quote
So, you don't think in a two weeks time span a swarm would make too big of a mess in an 8-frame deep box with medium frames hanging in it?


of course they will, but comb hanging from the bottom is easy. 
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Beregondo
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 20

Location: Elmira, NY


« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2012, 12:48:35 AM »

if you are concerned about wearing a path in your friend's field by crossing it too much when you check your trap:
Do you have a spotting scope r good pair of binoculars?
Sometimes you don't have to get very close physically in order to check entrance activity!
Logged
Intheswamp
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1216

Location: South Central Alabama - Zone 8A


WWW
« Reply #16 on: March 31, 2012, 09:47:23 AM »

Morning everybody.  We've had some strong storms and heavy rain pass through early this morning...er, passing through I should say as it is still raining.  I suppose the ladies out back are hanging out in the hive as it's not fit weather for flying.

kathyp, yelp, comb hanging off the bottom of the frames shouldn't be too big of a chore and will be good practice for a newbee to get in prep for possibility doing a cut-out or two later on.  I guess my concern was based on some combs I've seen pictures of that curve around and even back on itself, cross combing, etc,....just a maze of wax and bees.  In two weeks time they shouldn't get that far along.

Beregondo, I have thought of using some binoculars.  The trap is turned away from entrance to the pasture.  In the picture you can see part of the pond behind the trap....the entrance is on the other side of the water (towards the north) where you see parts of some buildings.  I can make out the silhouette of the trap box with my bare eyes from the entrance side of the water but can't make out much detail...but, that's with bare eyes.  At this time of the year, being as the sun will be shining on bees flying in the area in front of the trap and may actually light them up with the sunshine glistening through their wings/bodies.  Later this summer the sun will be higher in the sky and will cast more shadow in front of the trap.  If I do put a couple more traps out they will be over the rise of the hill and there won't be a line of sight on them from the entrance are to the property...but, with binoculars I might not have to drive as far across the field!

Ed
Logged

oregonbeeman
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 36

Location: Dallas Oregon


« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2012, 01:15:32 AM »

Nice. Gotta love those feral hives. Hope you catch a swarm or two.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.35 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page April 02, 2014, 03:35:40 PM