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Author Topic: Swarm just moved in  (Read 1246 times)
ShaneJ
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« on: March 03, 2012, 02:41:20 AM »

I have just received a call from a lady who wants me to remove some bees for her.  A swarm moved into her brick wall either yesterday afternoon or this morning.

I am wondering how I should attack this? Using the regular trap out method? Or would possibly just a box with a frame of eggs/brood be enough to attract them out without using a trap?

How would you pro's normally handle a job like this?

Thanks
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Shane
Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2012, 03:25:42 AM »

Right now you  might drive them out with Bee-Quick, Bee-Go or even smoke.  In a few days it won't work.  If you use smoke be VERY careful and have a fire extinguisher handy...
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
ShaneJ
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« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2012, 03:30:10 AM »

I have just been told the swarm has left the wall. And the home owner didn't see where they way. Damm  Smiley How far do swarms generally fly?

So in these cases getting some smoke into the wall might be enough to drive them out. Then you follow them and try and catch them where they land next?
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Shane
Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2012, 04:11:14 AM »

>How far do swarms generally fly?

1/4 mile is typical.  6 miles is not unheard of.  Often they regroup on a nearby limb.

>So in these cases getting some smoke into the wall might be enough to drive them out. Then you follow them and try and catch them where they land next?

If you can brush them as they come out onto a sheet in front of a hive (preferable with swarm lure and old comb) they will likely just move in.  But if not, yes, follow them.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
ShaneJ
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« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2012, 12:12:31 AM »

I got a call from the same lady again this morning and she said some of the bees were back. I went and had a look and found maybe 15-20 bees hanging around. They were entering some holes in the brick work and coming straight back out. I smoked the holes and inside of the wall to drive any bees out and I then blocked up the holes. I put a box of frames and foundation(all I have available) with a drop of lemon grass oil inside right where the bees were checking out the holes.

Would these be scout bees or just some bees left behind from the swarm that may have been there yesterday?
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Shane
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« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2012, 12:48:01 AM »

Sounds like the bees didn't move into her wall but a swarm alighted on her wall while waiting to find a permanent home.  The few bees that you found after the swarm left were the after swarm, the bees that were out while the swarm left for their new permanent home.  In my expereince they eventually find their way, probably back to their orginal hive.  Haven't kept count of how many times over the years someone called me to come collect a swarm and by the time I showed up, all that was left was the afterswarm.
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ShaneJ
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« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2012, 11:37:35 PM »

Well the left over bees are still hanging around and driving the homeowners crazy. Could anyone suggest a way to drive them away? I don't want to have to use the ol bug spray  Undecided
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Shane
kathyp
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« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2012, 11:56:54 PM »

how many bees are we talking about?  if it's just few scouts that returned and found the swarm gone, they should be no big deal and they will be gone in another day or so.  if there are more than just a few, you have something else going on.  either something that is attracting the bees to the area, or you have blocked a small swarm into the wall.

is anything blooming along that wall.  is anything producing pollen? 
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ShaneJ
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« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2012, 01:17:19 AM »

About 15-20 bees still hanging around. Problem is that its right beside the main entrance to the house and they have a 3 year old.
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Shane
Michael Bush
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« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2012, 03:25:39 AM »

Moth balls will sometimes drive them out, but will also kill them.  Either kind, Napthenate or Para Dichloro Benzene.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
ShaneJ
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« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2012, 04:46:32 AM »

I didn't even think of moth balls. I'll keep them in mind for next time.
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Shane
beyondthesidewalks
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« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2012, 10:10:05 AM »

I would think that the smell of their queen is keeping them there.  It will wear off and they will leave.  You may be able to speed that up with a bunch of smoke.  The smoke will disturb them and cover the scent that attracts them to the wall.
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2012, 11:38:11 AM »

Just spray some Bee Quick over ther area and they will leave. The owners will like the scent.
Jim
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