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Author Topic: Help with Plant ID  (Read 3765 times)
Sparky
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« on: March 02, 2012, 02:34:12 PM »

Can anyone help me with the identification of this shrub plant. It is one of the early plant blooms for our area. I got clippings from along the interstate median. It looks like the mature shrubs were around 8' tall and the blooms are very fragrant.



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Vance G
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2012, 11:34:44 PM »

You shotgunner!  fouo hONEYSUCKLE
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Sparky
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« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2012, 08:53:08 PM »

I didnt know wher to post it to get theright people to see it. tongue Thanks.
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Shawn
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« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2012, 10:08:26 PM »

Post it to the gardening section, "Discuss plant ID here", or maybe an admin will. I think it looks like Honeysuckle. I tried to find the ones I took of mine but I cant. Sorry!

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Shawn
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« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2012, 01:27:26 PM »

After looking through pictures of Honeysuckle Im not sure. When mine bloom, the blooms are tubulor. The leaf looks like honey suckle. Hopefully other will post their thoughts.
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AllenF
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« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2012, 05:05:53 PM »

Some kind of crab apple?
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Sparky
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« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2012, 08:52:21 PM »

It turns out to be a Honeysuckle bush that I have never heard of but will do what it takes to get some going at my house and the bee yards for EARLY season  natural pollen source.
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/gardens-gardening/your-garden/plant-finder/plant-details/kc/d970/lonicera-fragrantissima.aspx
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CVBees
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« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2012, 04:59:55 PM »

I know it is  bit invasive but native.  Henbit is a great early source.

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Ken
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« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2012, 05:30:00 PM »

You can post it here too next time:
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,17125.0.html
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G3farms
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« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2012, 08:11:05 PM »

Around here we call it Japanese honeysuckle, grows in a bush, the blooms are a bit shorter than the vine type of honeysuckle. Ours has just about come and gone and the vine type is just starting to bloom now.
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those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

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Sparky
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« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2012, 07:58:09 PM »

Around here we call it Japanese honeysuckle, grows in a bush, the blooms are a bit shorter than the vine type of honeysuckle. Ours has just about come and gone and the vine type is just starting to bloom now.

If it is the same as the bush honeysuckle that is in bloom around here now also, it is not the same as the kind in the link above. The fragrantissima type will be blooming coming out of winter a month before the the native ones start, that are in now. I found plants that shipping will kill the idea of planting a bunch. The cheapest will be from seed that I planted half the bag in the ground to see if they will grow naturally and the rest I will try to germinate.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2012, 10:01:59 PM by Sparky » Logged
beehappy1950
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« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2012, 09:32:52 PM »

Plant Nanking cherries, mine are blooming and the bees are going crazy. They are the earliest stuff going on here. They put on blooms before leaves. Harold
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Sparky
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« Reply #12 on: April 24, 2012, 10:07:07 PM »

Plant Nanking cherries, mine are blooming and the bees are going crazy. They are the earliest stuff going on here. They put on blooms before leaves. Harold

Yes they are nice to keep the bees busy. I have a row of them beside my garden, but they are over for the year of blooming in my area.
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