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Author Topic: Foundationless Frame Construction - Starter Strips  (Read 1795 times)
The Bix
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« on: February 24, 2012, 07:50:05 PM »

Does it make sense to put starter strips all around the inside of a foundationless frame instead of just the bottom of the top bar?  Would this encourage the bees to create more attachment points and increase the structural integrity of the combs?
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S.M.N.Bee
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« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2012, 08:12:14 PM »

Bix

Bees build from the top down. I'm not sure they would use the extra points.

John
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2012, 08:13:37 PM »

I think it's more work than it's worth.  But it will encourage attachments.  When I make my own bottom bars I make a beveled one.  It's no extra work.  I don't bother, though, on frames I buy.
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Michael Bush
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The Bix
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« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2012, 08:41:32 AM »

Thanks!
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Dogguy
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« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2012, 09:38:43 PM »

What is the most common material used for the starter strip?
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ShaneJ
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« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2012, 11:59:56 PM »

I've been thinking about using some balsa wood strips and see how it goes. I assume the strips don't have to be very strong?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2012, 12:15:00 AM »

>What is the most common material used for the starter strip?

I like wood, but wax is common.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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Dogguy
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« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2012, 08:02:40 AM »

MB what type of wood do you use?  Also when you build them are you using a wedge top with a grooved or split bottom and how far does the strip come down from the top bar?  Thanks
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Robo
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« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2012, 01:02:56 PM »

Would this encourage the bees to create more attachment points and increase the structural integrity of the combs?


I have found that it does seem to create more attachment in my limited experience.  With that said,  I agree that it is not worth the effort.  If you are worried about structural integrity,  wiring the frames is easier and gives better results.


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SEEYA
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« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2012, 06:35:56 PM »

VERY impressive,  shocked is that out of your double deep hive?
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beyondthesidewalks
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« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2012, 07:03:45 PM »

I tried cutting thin strips of foundation and putting them in the top bars of my frames.  Even sliced one side of the grooved frames off on the table saw, turning them into wedge tops, in an effort to get the strips of foundation to stay.  That didn't work well so I tried adding hot beeswax to "glue" them in and they still fell out.  Now I cut thin strips of standard 1X lumber and glue them in the grooves of my top bars.  Then I coat them with wax.  I also run two strands of 50# test monofilament line through the frame for comb support.  This year I bought some of the WTK foundationless frames, coated them with wax and added two runs of fishing line for comb support.  Too early to give a report on how well they did.  Anyone else have a report on WTK foundationless frames?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2012, 09:52:16 PM »

>MB what type of wood do you use?

Any.

>  Also when you build them are you using a wedge top with a grooved or split bottom and how far does the strip come down from the top bar?

All of the above.  Mostly I make mine a bevel, but you can turn the wedge on a wedge top, put a strip in a grooved top or put a bevel on any of them.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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