Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
September 03, 2014, 04:27:18 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Beemax hives  (Read 4713 times)
buzzbee
Ken
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5440


Location: North Central PA


WWW
« on: February 11, 2012, 07:23:57 AM »

With all the talk of insulated hives,i have not seen any reference to the beemax hives available here in the US. Is anyone using them? If so,are you happy with them?
Logged
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6403


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2012, 12:06:37 PM »

Yes, I use them and am extremely happy with them.   Despite the fear that they will be fragile,  they are actually quite tough.  Even if you do break them, a little glue and they are good as new.   I was even able to salvage them after a bear incident, where the wooded hives where not.

I also find they winter much better here in the north.  Use about 25-30% less stores than comparable wooden hives.

I don't particularly like the beemax bottom boards,  prefer to use my own. 

The only issue I have has with them is acrobat ants boring into them and making a nest.    I submerged the empty super in water (not an easy task) for a few days which solved the problem.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


buzzbee
Ken
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5440


Location: North Central PA


WWW
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2012, 01:00:10 PM »

Robo,
Will conventional supers fit the beemax hive bodies?
Logged
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6403


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2012, 01:20:14 PM »

Yes they can, the inside dimensions are the same.  In fact, I still use wooden honey supers.   I only use the beemax for deeps.

Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


SEEYA
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 274

Location: USA

Poke a meek dog enough times.........!


« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2012, 01:22:39 PM »

Do you have any issues with sunlight deteriorating the plastic? I know it messes up the sheet stuff from the lumber yard.
Logged

Live long and prosper!
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6403


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2012, 01:30:00 PM »

UV will cause it to "rot".   Simply painting it prevents that.   I do have a couple unpainted pieces that are going on 2 years old.  They have yellowed, but still seem pretty solid.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4195

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2012, 03:19:09 PM »

Quote
The only issue I have has with them is acrobat ants boring into them and making a nest.
I haven’t used the bee max yet, but I’ve had this same problem with my homemade insulated hives.  Wax moths can also drill some rather impressive holes in my low density foam hives when they pupate!
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13631


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2012, 10:18:10 PM »

I had too much condensation and I was converting to eight frames and they only come in 10...
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Sparky
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 804


Location: Hagerstown MD


« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2012, 12:42:05 PM »

As Rob pointed out about the bottom boards and the hive top feeders need improvement. Pros: are the amount of syrup it holds. Cons : The acrylic material between the bees and the reservoir will not provide much in the way of ventilation. I have some with small drilled holes in the top and some replaced with wire cloth. The bottoms are flat and do not provide good bee space to frames. Glued strips on before painting has held up well.
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2012, 04:39:20 PM »

.
Half of my polyboxes are 20 years old. They have not deteriorated in sun. They will stand to rest of my life.

Some are rough but I will turn them that shadow wall will be next 20 years agaist sun. Then my age is 85 y.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4195

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2012, 05:21:51 PM »

But Finski are you going to be able to lift deep Langstroth boxes at 85 years old?
Logged
Vance G
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1100

Location: Great Falls,Montana


« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2012, 06:27:13 PM »

I had too much condensation and I was converting to eight frames and they only come in 10...

I see the Northern Europeans are using the epe boxes with what looks like wide open bottom boards with mouse guards.  If the bottom entrance worked with the cluster to provide a circulation, would enough moisture leave thru the bottom board?  It would seem to me that if the water ran down the sides, it would freeze at the entrances blocking them?  I may have to do a test here next winter, but I fear I have too many warm days and their uniformly cold conditions might radically change the equation.  They are insulated covers and bottom boards, is that why they work?  Are the beemax bottomboards insulated?  Covers? 
Logged
edward
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1194


Location: BÖNAN SWEDEN

FEED ME HONEY or I`ll smash your screen !


« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2012, 07:57:30 PM »

I have a few poly hive boxes that are 33 years old , so they seem to last !

In the winter the air is cold and DRY , we ventilate out through the hive bottom , yes the walls can get frosty , haven't had any hives freeze shut , but dead bees can reduce ventilation so I use a high bottom board , a bout 8 cm under the lowest frame . It is ok that the walls have condensation as long as the bees are dry.

I don't know if poly hives work with top ventilation !?

We use big boxes for brood and 3/4 langstroth for harvesting , they way about 17kg , don't forget to bend your knees  Wink

If you have poly hives that have become yellow from UV light , wash and brush them clean so they become white and give they a coat of paint and they will last many more years.

mvh edward  tongue
Logged
edward
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1194


Location: BÖNAN SWEDEN

FEED ME HONEY or I`ll smash your screen !


« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2012, 08:03:35 PM »

are you going to be able to lift deep Langstroth boxes at 85 years old?

I don't think its the honey that makes beekeepers live longer lives , its the workout beekeeper get i the bee yard harvesting all the heavy honey boxes , not a job for the feeble and frail  Brian chop chop chop chop chop chop Brian

mvh edward  tongue
Logged
Sparky
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 804


Location: Hagerstown MD


« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2012, 08:12:24 PM »

are you going to be able to lift deep Langstroth boxes at 85 years old?

I don't think its the honey that makes beekeepers live longer lives , its the workout beekeeper get i the bee yard harvesting all the heavy honey boxes , not a job for the feeble and frail  Brian chop chop chop chop chop chop Brian

mvh edward  tongue
Are you sure it is not from the good mead that keeps us going ? grin
Logged
edward
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1194


Location: BÖNAN SWEDEN

FEED ME HONEY or I`ll smash your screen !


« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2012, 08:21:15 PM »

OK I´ll try anything cheer once .. ... .... or maybee twice cheer cheer

Wasn't it the vikings that invented mead  grin ?

mvh edward  tongue
Logged
Vance G
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1100

Location: Great Falls,Montana


« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2012, 12:46:43 AM »

Edward  When you say the inside gets frosy, does that include ice on the underside of the lid over the bees?  Does it ever drip down on the bees and damage them? 
Logged
edward
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1194


Location: BÖNAN SWEDEN

FEED ME HONEY or I`ll smash your screen !


« Reply #17 on: February 13, 2012, 02:34:11 AM »

I haven't looked that much inside my hives in the winter , better to leave them alone , but I have never seen frost on top of the bees , inside the hive.

Also after snow storms when checking on hives finding them buried in snow and not having a shovel , thinking that surely they are going to suffocate.
3-4 days later when I come back with a snow shovel the snow has blown away from the hive leaving an air space around it + the girls are fine.

I don't exactly know how or why it works but i does , I just listen to the more experienced beekeeper and do the same as them , I think that you just need to choose a way too keep your bees and the bees will adapt to the dynamics of the hive they have.

The bees survive despite the beekeepers ideas  Wink

mvh edward  tongue
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2012, 05:09:30 AM »

, but I have never seen frost on top of the bees , inside the hive.



I don't know if poly hives work with top ventilation !?

Edward uses mesh floor like all modern beekeepers. I use solid floor and 15 mm upper entrance.

I have seen frost = condensated moisture in hive corners. It is normal.
When it melts, it drills out via bottom. - Or it forms thick ice layer on bottom. It makes no harm to bees.
I have seem thick ice sticks hanging in top bars of the frames.


Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #19 on: February 13, 2012, 05:13:09 AM »


We use big boxes for brood and 3/4 langstroth for harvesting , they way about 17kg , don't forget to bend your knees  Wink

It has same dimensions as American medium frame.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.341 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page September 02, 2014, 03:59:44 PM