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Author Topic: Insulated hive and insulated bottom  (Read 3898 times)
rdy-b
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« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2012, 09:58:37 PM »

  check out the bottom board it looks like its molded in one piece
 but the detail is that it has a ramp effect that creates a drain for moisture to
 run out the front-- Wink  RDY-B
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Vance G
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« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2012, 10:15:42 PM »

Canadian beekeeper Larry Dick reports on his forum honeybeeworld that the varroa seem to build up faster in epe boxes produced north of Calgary.  He attributes the increase in varroa  to the bees raising brood earlier and later in the season.  Do you find that to be the case in Finland Finski?
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rdy-b
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« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2012, 10:57:13 PM »

Canadian beekeeper Larry Dick reports on his forum honeybeeworld that the varroa seem to build up faster in epe boxes produced north of Calgary.  He attributes the increase in varroa  to the bees raising brood earlier and later in the season.  Do you find that to be the case in Finland Finski?
  ALLEN DICK--???
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Finski
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« Reply #23 on: February 07, 2012, 12:57:19 AM »

Canadian beekeeper Larry Dick reports on his forum honeybeeworld that the varroa seem to build up faster in epe boxes produced north of Calgary.  He attributes the increase in varroa  to the bees raising brood earlier and later in the season.  Do you find that to be the case in Finland Finski?

At least here early brooding does not depend on hive material.

Bees have brood earlier if they have good pollen stores after winter. Carniolan's strong Spring build up depends on good pollen stores. I know that, because when I started pollen feedinng 20 years ago to Italians and carniolans, their build up was the same.

No one has reported that Carniolan has more mites than Italians.

We have had years that bees have clearly longer brood period than in normal years. That makes difficulties with varroa.

Warm hive makes faster build up possible because brood ball can be bigger, but it does not make mites propagation cycle faster.  The brood temp is allway the same.

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Vance G
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« Reply #24 on: February 07, 2012, 09:31:21 AM »

Yes, Allen Dick!  I torture his name all the time for some reason.  My apologies.
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Finski
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« Reply #25 on: February 07, 2012, 10:10:18 AM »

.
What is epe boxes?
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rdy-b
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« Reply #26 on: February 07, 2012, 07:04:37 PM »

.
What is epe boxes?
EPS= expanded poly styrene --Styrofoam  Smiley RDY-B
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Finski
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« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2012, 01:44:40 AM »

EPS= expanded poly styrene --Styrofoam  Smiley RDY-B

When I read Allen Dick's writings, he had no experience about polyhives. The just thought things.
At least in our country the brooding start or stop does not depend on insulation or hive material.
It is pollen in nature which tells to bees when is time to rear brood.
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T Beek
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« Reply #28 on: February 08, 2012, 02:22:26 PM »

Cool videos, thanks for the post Finski. 

So far only my LONG Hive has an insulated bottom (and top) and it may not have helped them this year.  I'm not totally convinced yet if side or bottom insulation would be good for my Langs, and yes it may have something to do w/ this crazy weather  grin  I do insulate the tops.

thomas
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"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
rdy-b
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« Reply #29 on: February 08, 2012, 03:49:02 PM »

EPS= expanded poly styrene --Styrofoam  Smiley RDY-B

When I read Allen Dick's writings, he had no experience about polyhives. The just thought things.
At least in our country the brooding start or stop does not depend on insulation or hive material.
It is pollen in nature which tells to bees when is time to rear brood.

 He was comparing poly hive to a wood Hive--poly hive starts brooding earlier --varoa mite can live 5-6 months
 with bees that have no brood---because poly hive has brood before the wood hive it gets a huge surge of varoa
 flooding into the first round of brood--and thats where they got the higher mite counts -and there was correlation with
 the first round of brood having more mites under cap--whether it was poly hive or wood hive---these days the diary is
reflecting his work with poly hives and oxalic -with intense mite counting---RDY-B
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Vance G
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« Reply #30 on: February 08, 2012, 04:29:40 PM »

Yes RDY-b,,  You said what I only mumbled.  Apparently you follow his site too.  Have you also read Pederson Apiaries site in Alberta and Frenchbeefarm.com?  I find more of interest in the Canadian sites than what the more southern keepers find.  Beekeeping is local.
I think they just have more to teach me.  I just don't know if I have the guts to winter in single Langstroth deeps!  I guess I need to experiment. 
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T Beek
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« Reply #31 on: February 08, 2012, 04:41:18 PM »

Hey, me too Vance G.  I love them Canadian beeks and follow their lead often, just wish we had the same access to their bees as we used to have Cry

thomas
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"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
rdy-b
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« Reply #32 on: February 08, 2012, 04:58:13 PM »

          *Frenchbeefarm.com?*

  supper cool site -I will have to explore pederson-- Wink RDY-B
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rdy-b
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« Reply #33 on: February 08, 2012, 06:32:43 PM »

  HEres one for you Vance- Smiley
 http://www.stepplerfarms.com/Stepplerhoneynews.html
 RDY-B
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Vance G
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« Reply #34 on: February 08, 2012, 08:23:21 PM »

Thanks, I will add to my collection.  I am looking for one of those Ayelander wild men who build  two nucs in a divided 10 frame, separate entrances front and back and then put a queen excluder on it and super and let both sides store honey for surplus in same super.  When winter comes, they feed them heavily and put on a feeder box with sugar or fondant over the queen excluder and winter them that way communally.  They then divide them and run them as 10 frame singles the next year.   I need to find it again, but those are the details of what they are doing and they claim success.  This bluebird winter is giving me visions and i'm wondering if I could make these strategies work. 
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Finski
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« Reply #35 on: February 09, 2012, 12:26:38 AM »


When I read Allen Dick's writings, he had no experience about polyhives. The just thought things.
At least in our country the brooding start or stop does not depend on insulation or hive material.
It is pollen in nature which tells to bees when is time to rear brood.

 He was comparing poly hive to a wood Hive--poly hive starts brooding earlier --varoa mite can live 5-6 months
 with bees that have no brood---because poly hive has brood before the wood hive it gets a huge surge of varoa
 flooding into the first round of brood--and thats where they got the higher mite counts -and there was correlation with
 the first round of brood having more mites under cap--whether it was poly hive or wood hive---these days the diary is
reflecting his work with poly hives and oxalic -with intense mite counting---RDY-B
[/quote]

The difference is that I have 23 years experience on polyhives and mites.
I have read all Allen Dick's writings too and he say that Canadian tried a few ago polyhives.

 And thies is a first mentioning which says that polyhives has more mites. That is pure imagination.
Polyhives are so long and widely used in Europe that no one has mentioned that.

One thing more. Polyhives and wooden hives stop brooding in Autumn at same time. It tells that Allen did not have experience on polys.   

If Allen start to make his trials 20 years later than European professional beekeeprs, it doe not help.
.European varroa group worked on scientific bases several years to find out the best varroa control systems. Now Canada, 10 years later, accepted those results into practice officially.
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rdy-b
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« Reply #36 on: February 09, 2012, 04:04:39 PM »

** And thies is a first mentioning which says that polyhives has more mites. That is pure imagination.
Polyhives are so long and widely used in Europe that no one has mentioned that.**


 if there more bees there more mites--if there more brood there more mites
if one hive broods first it has mites first--(under cap)
keeping everything in context and given the conditions are equal and balanced
 
 DOSENT NECESSARILY HAVE TO BE A POLY HIVE but thats the comparison
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Finski
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« Reply #37 on: February 09, 2012, 04:19:10 PM »

.

You need only kill mites. Not count them.
Polyhives are cold mines. Nothing wrong in them. They are really popular.

Mite killing is easy in climate like in Canada or Finland because we have a good brood brake.

If you want to use 20 years old mite killing methods, do it for God's sake but don't insult newer methods which you do not even know what they are.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2012, 04:42:06 PM by Finski » Logged

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rdy-b
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« Reply #38 on: February 09, 2012, 04:40:22 PM »

.

You need only kill mites. Not count them.

  I agree whole heartedly- cool RDY-B
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T Beek
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« Reply #39 on: February 10, 2012, 06:10:36 AM »

After 8 winters  I've had no mite issues to speak of (yet?), nor have I actively 'killed' any by introducing chemicals into any of my hives. 

I'm not sure I'd even want to kill them if I were to develop an issue, as I've come to believe the bees and mites likely depend on each other (we dumb humans just haven't figured it all out yet  grin ) and only by using proper management techniques w/ our colonies can we also 'limit' mites, not eliminate them. 

IMO; healthy bees = fewer mites

Frankly, I don't think its possible to kill mites without some consequences, such as also eventually killing off our bee colonies.  But hey that's just me, I'm not trying to convince anyone.

thomas
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