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Author Topic: Chance of clover planting surviving????  (Read 8637 times)
Intheswamp
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« on: January 10, 2012, 10:24:17 AM »

What do you think the chance is of my clover seed sprouting and growing?

I had 10# of white dutch mixed with 2# of crimson that I broadcasted with a hand spreader on top of thin sod last Saturday (01/07/12) here in south central Alabama.

Some rain everyday (about 5 days worth) since then, sometimes hard rain.  Yesterday, though, most of the daytime was nice and sunny.  Temperatures have been in mid 60's/low 70's.  Night time temps in the 50's.

Heavy rain expected today.  Clear tomorrow with a high in the low 60's.

THEN....three nights of sub-freezing temperatures in the mid to upper 20's....daytime temps in the 50's, creeping back up into the 60's as the night time temps move out of the sub-freezing range.

What do you think the chances are that my clover seed will germinate and survive the freeze?

Thanks,
Ed
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2012, 01:34:08 PM »

I would say pretty good. Up north here we broadcast clover seed in the late fall and just let the freeze/thaw cycles work it in. Sometimes it will sprout up in the fall sometimes not until spring, so your little freezes shouldnt hurt it.
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kathyp
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2012, 02:12:23 PM »

ditto that.  more chance that the rain will wash it out than that the freeze will hurt it. 
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2012, 04:20:47 PM »

If we do not have any more winter in the South East than we have already  had, out look is good.
Clover should be planted in late August or September along with a protection crop such as rye grass or orchid grass so it will develop a good root system. Although Crimson clover is an Annual It will dir in the spring after blooming. Next year look into the clovers that you don't have to replant every year. When the white clover gets some age on it late next spring you will want to clip it after a good shower, not too short. It will put out new growth in a few days and will be blooming again in a week to 10 days. :)don2
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2012, 06:43:17 PM »

Thanks for the feedback ya'll.  I guess I'll wait (what else can I do? Smiley ) and see what happens.  There's been a few spells of heavy rain, but mostly slow steady rain.  Only maybe one good rain today...the heavy rain was to the south and north of us.  Supposed to get more tonight but it doesn't look promising on the radar.  Sunny tomorrow and then the cold comes in.

Good to hear on the freeze not being a major factor, oblib.

kathyp, in referring to the clover getting washed out are you referring to new sprouts roots getting washed out of the soil?  I was hoping that the sod would hold things together for it...it is a bahia grass pasture with a liberal dose of wild blackberry in it and lots of "weeds".  My thoughts were the rains would wash the seed off the grass blades and weed leaves and wash it on down to the soil level.  Huh

don2, the crimson was mostly for my wife.  She had wanted to plant a little for a while now and I couldn't hardly scatter the white dutch without scattering some crimson. Smiley  My focus is on the perennial white dutch.  I wanted some New Zealand white but I'm starting to see mentions of the two (white dutch and New Zealand) being one and the same.  About the only place I saw the New Zealand was at Johnny's Seeds and it was high $$$.  In my search the New Zealand has been stated as being a tough plant with some drought resistance....the white dutch is also noted as having some drought resistant characteristics.  Thanks for the tip on trimming the white clover back in late spring!!

Ed

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"We can't expect the American People to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism."..."The press is our chief ideological weapon." - Nikita Khrushchev
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2012, 07:01:50 PM »

>>I would say pretty good. Up north here we broadcast clover seed in the late fall and just let the freeze/thaw cycles work it in.
    
 It's called frost seeding (why, I don't know)


>>I broadcasted with a hand spreader on top of thin sod

 Fertilizer? Lime? Have you had the soil tested? In my area we have a lot of problem with sour (acidic) ground (acid rain).
I plowed down about 10 acres of old sod, in early summer, planned on planting it to hay. I had a local company spread 3 tons/ acre of lime. When I went back in the late summer to finish fitting the field, I found a really nice field of Red Clover and Timothy.
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AllenF
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2012, 08:16:01 PM »

We plant all kinds of clovers in the fall.   Crimson, arrowhead, whites, all in food plots for deer.   What we planted back in August is just very very small right now, one inch high at the most.   Too small for the deer really to eat, but by spring, it will be knee high.   And the bees love it.   You are planting such a small amount, I would not worry about having the soil tested but it to me does seem late for planting, but you are south of me.   
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2012, 07:28:58 PM »

Hmmm, well the mix of white dutch and crimson clover was planted on January 7th.  I really can't tell if it's growing or not.  What size should it be by now and should it be blooming soon?  There's lots of some type of a small yellow clover blooming everywhere and I've seen a few patches of a larger white with pink tinge clover blooming along with crimson blooming.  I'm just wondering if I planted wrong, got some dud seed, or just need to be patient a bit longer.

Thanks!
Ed
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www.beeweather.com 
American blood spilled to protect the freedom and peace of people all over the world.  320,000 USA casualties in WWI, 1,076,000 USA casualties in WWII, 128,000 USA casualties in the Korean War, 211,000 casualties in the Vietnam "conflict", 57,000 USA casualties in "War on Terror".  Benghazi, Libya, 13 USA casualties. These figures don't include 70,000 MIA.  But, the leaders of one political party of the United States of America continue to make the statement..."What difference does it make?".

"We can't expect the American People to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism."..."The press is our chief ideological weapon." - Nikita Khrushchev
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« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2012, 08:29:29 PM »

Be patient and see.   If it does not come up the way you want, plant again in the fall.
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #9 on: March 25, 2012, 10:15:12 AM »

Thanks Allen.  Yelp, I just need a little patience. Smiley  I've got a good bit of different kind of clover coming up.  I'm starting another thread for id purposes, but here are a couple of pictures of what's growing all around my area...the pinkish white clover gets up around 6-8 inches tall.  The yellow clover is only around 4-6 inches tall (more towards to short end of the range).  Have you got an idea of what they are?

Ed


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www.beeweather.com 
American blood spilled to protect the freedom and peace of people all over the world.  320,000 USA casualties in WWI, 1,076,000 USA casualties in WWII, 128,000 USA casualties in the Korean War, 211,000 casualties in the Vietnam "conflict", 57,000 USA casualties in "War on Terror".  Benghazi, Libya, 13 USA casualties. These figures don't include 70,000 MIA.  But, the leaders of one political party of the United States of America continue to make the statement..."What difference does it make?".

"We can't expect the American People to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism."..."The press is our chief ideological weapon." - Nikita Khrushchev
Intheswamp
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« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2012, 02:39:45 PM »

Well, I had basically 0% of the 10# of white dutch clover from Outsidepride to grow/bloom/make-itself-known.  I had probably .00001% of the 2# of crimson to do the same....basically enough blooms to hold in one hand.  I contacted Outsidepride this morning and the reply I got was that I planted the seed at the wrong time of the year.  huh  The email stated that the seed would not even germinate in January and went on to explain that the below freezing nights that we had a few days after planting would have killed any new roots  Outsidepride's last statement was...

"You should never plant seed until frost season is completely over and night time temps are in the upper 40's or warmer and then keep the seed moist."

I missed the spring planting season, I was waiting for what I planted to show up. Sad  The summer heat is coming.  I guess I should wait until the fall to try planting it again?  huh

Thanks for your feedback,
Ed
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www.beeweather.com 
American blood spilled to protect the freedom and peace of people all over the world.  320,000 USA casualties in WWI, 1,076,000 USA casualties in WWII, 128,000 USA casualties in the Korean War, 211,000 casualties in the Vietnam "conflict", 57,000 USA casualties in "War on Terror".  Benghazi, Libya, 13 USA casualties. These figures don't include 70,000 MIA.  But, the leaders of one political party of the United States of America continue to make the statement..."What difference does it make?".

"We can't expect the American People to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism."..."The press is our chief ideological weapon." - Nikita Khrushchev
AllenF
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« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2012, 07:51:25 PM »

We plant clover for deer late summer and very early fall. 
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« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2012, 09:04:57 PM »

I do not know what your local Ag extention would recommend for your area but here in Maryland we plant the clovers in mid to later part of August for fall deer forage crops. We also have less weed problems with planting this time of year.
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #13 on: June 08, 2012, 12:32:26 AM »

Thanks for the feedback.  I think I'll shoot for planting it the first of September depending on the moisture situation then...ya'll (and the bees) are gonna make a farmer out of me yet! Smiley 

Ed
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www.beeweather.com 
American blood spilled to protect the freedom and peace of people all over the world.  320,000 USA casualties in WWI, 1,076,000 USA casualties in WWII, 128,000 USA casualties in the Korean War, 211,000 casualties in the Vietnam "conflict", 57,000 USA casualties in "War on Terror".  Benghazi, Libya, 13 USA casualties. These figures don't include 70,000 MIA.  But, the leaders of one political party of the United States of America continue to make the statement..."What difference does it make?".

"We can't expect the American People to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism."..."The press is our chief ideological weapon." - Nikita Khrushchev
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« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2012, 01:09:46 PM »

Will clover grow next spring  if I simply broadcast it over mowed lawn in the late fall? Or does the ground absolutely have to be cultivated?
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AllenF
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« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2012, 01:19:51 PM »

I would guess some would grow, but not much.    Depends on the dirt, grass, rain, and what kind of seed you get.   Just remember, you would need to plant acres of that stuff to impact the bees.   
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2012, 07:48:07 AM »

Your last statement to heus has got me thinking that I might just forget the clover planting.  I've got a little of that white clover shown in a previous photo growing along the state ROW...patches here and there.  But, that small yellow clover in one of the pictures is *everywhere* around here....on the ROW, in the pastures, etc.,.  At least I'm thinking it's clover  Undecided ...anybody want to confirm that for me and maybe which variety it is?  The bees did seem to like it this fall.

My idea of planting the white dutch was to get some standss started here and there and hopefully to see it spread out some from those stands.  I don't have a means of cultivating so my germination and survival rate would probably be low anyhow.  Undecided

I'll probably just go with what God's given me already. Wink

Ed
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www.beeweather.com 
American blood spilled to protect the freedom and peace of people all over the world.  320,000 USA casualties in WWI, 1,076,000 USA casualties in WWII, 128,000 USA casualties in the Korean War, 211,000 casualties in the Vietnam "conflict", 57,000 USA casualties in "War on Terror".  Benghazi, Libya, 13 USA casualties. These figures don't include 70,000 MIA.  But, the leaders of one political party of the United States of America continue to make the statement..."What difference does it make?".

"We can't expect the American People to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism."..."The press is our chief ideological weapon." - Nikita Khrushchev
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« Reply #17 on: June 09, 2012, 10:34:54 PM »

That is yellow clover in the picture. That type looks a lot like alfalfa the way it grows and does fix nitrogen into the soil. If you want to see something that the bees will "really" go for, you could plant some yellow sweet clover. The only draw back on it is that it's a biennial and will not grow as many years as the white.
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AllenF
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« Reply #18 on: June 10, 2012, 07:09:13 PM »

Yellow sweet clover grows tall also.   It is a field plant, not a yard plant.   But it will make honey. 
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kingbee
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« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2012, 01:03:23 AM »

Yellow clover also won't bloom until the second summer.
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