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Author Topic: Chance of clover planting surviving????  (Read 9087 times)
Joe D
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« Reply #20 on: July 02, 2012, 12:05:17 AM »


Swamp, check with your local feed store when to plant your clover.  Here I would plant sept maybe oct depending on rain so you can disc.  Bees get after the crimpson for pollen.  I have 25 acres with crimson clover, hairy fetch, and rye grass.
I rent out my fields to a hay farmer, but I want let him cut spring cutting until clover and fetch have seeded.  Then when he cuts it a lot of seeds gets left and will come back good the next year.

Allen, the deer and turkey here really like the hairy fetch.


Joe
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #21 on: July 02, 2012, 01:44:00 AM »

Howdy Joe.  You read my mind about planting the clover.  I was figuring on planting in September depending on the moisture and heat.  Hopefully we will be out of the summer drought period by then.

Thanks for the reinforcement on the idea of letting the clover go to seed before mowing.

Hope things are cooler over in Misssissippi than over here...I'm hoping for some of that rain this coming week!

Best wishes,
Ed
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Sparky
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« Reply #22 on: July 02, 2012, 09:28:55 PM »

Joe are you referring to vetch when you say fetch ? I never heard of fetch.
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Joe D
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« Reply #23 on: July 03, 2012, 12:55:08 AM »


Yep, Sparky wandering finger, v is close to f ha.  I think it is just as hot here as across the state line Swamp.  I have had that field for 30 years now with out having to replant.
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Sparky
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« Reply #24 on: July 03, 2012, 09:35:07 PM »

WOW !! talk about long lived. Do you mow it to keep the weed competition down or is it so thick that it chokes them out ? How long do the blooms last for foraging ?
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Joe D
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« Reply #25 on: July 03, 2012, 11:43:34 PM »

For several years I grazed cattle on it, they help to spread the seed.  I would put the cows off let it get to a good field of hay(clover and vetch would have some dried seed) and cut it for hay.  After selling all my cows I rented the fields to hay farmers. I told them when I rented to them that they would have to let the clover and vetch have some dried seed before cutting in the spring so it would reseed itself.  With close to 25 acres and the way plants bloom I get a few weeks of clover pollen and vetch nectar.  They go for the crimson clover more than the vetch here anyway.  I think they get nectar from the vetch, they do get pollen from the clover.  I have some ti ti in front of the house that comes in first.  Then the clover and vetch,by the time its done wild hedge is starting or fixing to.   Gets a good start to spring.


Joe
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Sparky
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« Reply #26 on: July 04, 2012, 09:10:53 PM »

I know there are many types of vetch but the type that the state plants on highway banks and in the medians in our state the bees do not touch it.
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Joe D
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« Reply #27 on: July 06, 2012, 01:07:20 AM »

They don't mess with it near as much as the clover.  This vetch, years ago was planted as a cover crop.  It is a kind of pea vine plant with purple blooms, and then little seed pods that turn black when getting done.  The deer love the plant and the turkeys like the plant and the seed.  It can grow some pretty nice deer.



Joe
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