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Author Topic: What's a good or great pollen plant?  (Read 4103 times)
qa33010
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« on: July 31, 2005, 02:52:11 AM »

Hi all!

     I've seen different threads about nectar plants, shrubs, trees and so on, but, I haven't seen anything on pollen plants.  Do they normally go hand in hand (if nectar then there is also pollen)?  We want to set some pollen producers with nectar producers.  Did I miss it on a search?  Thanks!!                David
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Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
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« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2005, 06:39:49 AM »

from what I have seen and heard about , early in the spring , one of the first blooming tree's around here are Bradford Pair tree's, they get alot of pollin from them and also some nectar from what I was told, but they do get alot of pollin from them. them tree's just fill up with blooms.
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bassman1977
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« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2005, 10:10:47 AM »

I don't know if this will help anyone (especially those in the south).  It's a list of Northern pollen sources.  There's also a link on the same page for nectar sources.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollen_source
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qa33010
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« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2005, 02:31:37 AM »

bassman1977

              BUD!!!  That was excellent!  THANK YOU!!!

                                                   
  twt

              Yeah Man!  We have a Bradford a block and a half away!  COOL!  THANK!


                                           David
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Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
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« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2005, 10:32:00 AM »

The main issue for pollen is early.  Maples and elms are pretty early.  bleep willows are very early and are hard to beat for early pollen.
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leominsterbeeman
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« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2005, 11:09:18 AM »

Bleep Willows strike again!

Pussywillows is the translation for Bleep Willows.
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2005, 01:32:06 PM »

We have sunflowers all over are farm and town and the bees get a TON of pollen from them plus a really good supply of nectar. The best thing about sunflowers is they will grow about anywhere! Cheesy
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« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2005, 02:42:34 PM »

I was afraid it would get "bleeped".  Smiley  I'll try to remember to leave out the space.
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Michael Bush
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bassman1977
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« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2005, 07:55:13 PM »

Anyone have any idea about Queen Anne's Lace?  I'm thinking it's good for pollen but can't find anything for sure.  I'm curious if it does have any nectar value as well.
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« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2005, 09:49:15 PM »

I have never noticed a honeybee working Queen Anns Lace. I have seen several very small bees about the size of a small deer fly on them though.
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« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2005, 11:40:59 PM »

Here is a link to Danish report. It is quite a realiable information source for pollen and nectar.
http://www.danmarksinsekter.dk/biplantekalender.pdf

As Michael says, early pollen and much enough is most important.  The last pollen at autumn is also important.

Some look at the list too keenly. It is not the right way. It depends how much you have plant around a mile and how plant react at weathers.
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bassman1977
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« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2005, 08:36:35 AM »

I can't read what it says  embarassed
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Finsky
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« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2005, 01:45:22 PM »

Quote from: bassman1977
I can't read what it says  embarassed


 You are joking!

Danish is very near  English and the distance to England is little.

Read this:

Pollen i= pollen
megen = many,plenty 000
lidt pollen = little pollen 0
en del = partly (between those two 00

Nectar = nektar

You have symbols +++ , and 000 and you have scientic names for plants.

Lord helps only them who helps Tongue  himself

And no one else can understand Danish except Danish. Tongue
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Apis629
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« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2005, 02:37:06 PM »

In late summer through early fall I get almost all of my pollen from bottle brush and elephant grasses.
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Rich V
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« Reply #14 on: August 02, 2005, 05:09:25 PM »

Queen Anne's Lace is a poor source for Honeybee pollen.
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bassman1977
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« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2005, 06:23:35 PM »

Thanks.
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« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2005, 10:14:38 PM »

Quote from: leominsterbeeman
Bleep Willows strike again!

Pussywillows is the translation for Bleep Willows.


well, there's no bleep footing around the subject like a bleep cat!  haha.  sorry
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Finsky
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« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2005, 12:37:25 AM »

Here is really a valuable report from Australia

http://www.rirdc.gov.au/reports/HBE/01-047.pdf
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qa33010
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« Reply #18 on: August 05, 2005, 10:16:21 PM »

I found a bunch of info on the University of Georgia website by Professor Keith DeLaplane (hope I spelled this right) for the southeast.  Arkansas is, at times, considered southeast.   It has (n)ector and (p)ollen as well as blooming time frames.  I'm not sure what the other numbers mean, have to double check.  I also found the girls, as of yesterday had started to bring in orange pollen.  I'm also apologizing for the length of info, you may have to edit it since I don't have a clue how to set up a link (maybe a PM would help).  Here it is:

Plants for prolonged-blooming bee pasture in the Southeast16,17,18,19,20,21
 
Common Name Scientific Name
 Type
 Availability
 Resource (nectar or pollen)
 Bloom Dates
 
Cajeput (Tea Tree)
 Melaleuca quinquenervia
 tree
 feral
 n,p
 much of the year
 
Chickweed
 Stellaria spp.
 ann. or per. herb
 feral
 n,p
 much of the year
 
Cucumber
 Cucumis sativa
 ann. herb
 cultivated
 n,p
 much of the year
 
Pumpkin
 Cucurbita spp.
 ann.
 cultivated
 n,p
 much of the year
 
Alder
 Alnus spp.
 tree
 feral
 p
 January-June
 
Blueberry
 Vaccinium spp.
 shrub
 cultivated, feral
 n,p
 January-June
 
Maple
 Acer spp.
 tree
 feral
 n,p
 January-May
 
Cantaloupe
 Cucumis melo
 ann. herb
 cultivated
 n,p
 February-August
 
Citrus
 Citrus spp.
 tree
 cultivated
 n,p
 February-May
 
Dandelion
 Taraxacum spp.
 bien. or per. herb
 feral
 n,p
 February-September
 
Dead Nettle (Henbit)
 Lamium spp.
 ann. or per. herb
 feral, ornamental, sometimes invasive
 p
 February-October
 
Elm
 Ulmus spp.
 tree
 feral
 n,p
 February-April
 
Groundsel
 Senecio spp.
 ann. or per. herb, shrub
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 February-May
 
Hawthorn
 Crataegus spp.
 shrub, tree
 feral
 n,p
 February-June
 
Peach
 Prunus persica
 tree
 cultivated
 n,p
 February-April
 
Pine
 Pinus spp.
 tree
 cultivated, feral
 p
 February-April
 
Skunk Cabbage (Polecat Weed)
 Symplocarpus foetidus
 per. herb
 feral, ornamental
 p
 February-April
 
Titi (Spring Titi)
 Cliftonia spp.
 shrub
 feral
 n,p
 February-April
 
Willow
 Salix spp.
 tree
 feral
 n,p
 February-June
 
Apple
 Malus spp.
 tree
 cultivated
 n,p
 March-May
 
Ash
 Fraxinus spp.
 tree
 feral
 p
 March-May
 
Blackberry
 Rubus spp.
 shrub
 cultivated, feral
 n,p
 March-June
 
Black Locust
 Robinia pseudoacacia
 tree
 feral
 n,p
 March-June
 
Cherry (cultivated and uncultivated)
 Prunus spp.
 tree, shrub
 cultivated, feral
 n,p
 March-May
 
Cottonwood
 Populus spp.
 tree
 feral
 p
 March-May
 
Flowering Dogwood
 Cornus florida
 tree
 feral
 n,p
 March-April
 
Gallberry
 Ilex glabra
 shrub
 feral
 n,p
 March-June
 
Mustard
 Brassica spp.
 ann. or bien. herb
 feral
 n,p
 March-September
 
Oak
 Quercus spp.
 tree
 feral
 p
 March-May
 
Persimmon
 Diospyros virginiana
 tree
 cultivated, feral
 n,p
 March-June
 
Plum (cultivated)
 Prunus spp.
 tree
 cultivated
 n,p
 March-April
 
Rape (Canola)
 Brassica napus
 ann. herb.
 cultivated oilseed
 n,p
 March-May
 
Rattan Vine
 Berchemia scandens
 shrub
 feral
 .
 March-June
 
Redbud
 Cercis spp.
 shrub, tree
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 March-May
 
Tupelo
 Nyssa spp.
 tree
 feral
 n,p
 March-June
 
Vervain
 Verbena spp.
 ann. or per. herb
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 March-October
 
Alsike Clover
 Trifolium hybridum
 per. herb
 cultivated forage
 n,p
 April-September
 
Bindweed
 Convolvulus spp.
 ann. or per. herb
 feral, ornamental, sometimes invasive
 n,p
 April-September
 
Buckeye
 Aesculus spp.
 shrub, tree
 feral
 n,p
 April-May
 
Buckthorn
 Rhamnus spp.
 shrub, tree
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 April-June
 
Catclaw
 Acacia greggii
 shrub, tree
 feral
 n,p
 April-July
 
Coneflower
 Rudbeckia spp.
 ann., bien, or per. herb
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 April-September
 
Corn
 Zea maize
 ann.
 cultivated
 p
 April-September
 
Crimson Clover
 Trifolium incarnatum
 ann. herb
 cultivated forage
 n,p
 April-June
 
Elderberry
 Sambucus spp.
 shrub, tree
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 April-July
 
Holly
 Ilex spp.
 shrub, tree
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 April-June
 
Honey Locust
 Gleditsia triacanthos
 tree
 feral
 n,p
 April-June
 
Honeysuckle
 Lonicera spp.
 shrub
 feral
 n,p
 April-August
 
Horsemint (Bee Balm)
 Monarda spp.
 ann. or per. herb
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 April-October
 
Huckleberry
 Gaylussacia spp.
 shrub
 feral
 n,p
 April-June
 
Johnson Grass
 Sorghum halepense
 per.
 cultivated forage, feral, sometimes noxious
 .
 April-November
 
Marigold
 Gaillardia pulchella
 ann.
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 April-October
 
Mesquite
 Prosopsis glandulosa
 shrub, tree
 feral
 n,p
 April-June
 
Pear
 Pyrus spp.
 tree
 cultivated, ornamental
 n,p
 April-May
 
Pepper Vine
 Ampelopsis spp.
 vine, shrub
 feral
 n,p
 April-August
 
Persian Clover
 Trifolium resupinatum
 ann. herb
 .
 n,p
 April-September
 
Privet
 Ligustrum spp.
 shrub
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 April-July
 
Red Clover
 Trifolium pratense
 short-lived per.
 cultivated forage
 n,p
 April-September
 
Sage
 Salvia spp.
 ann. or per. herb, shrub
 ornamental
 n,p
 April-May
 
Sweet Clover (White, Yellow)
 Melilotus spp.
 bien. herb
 cultivated forage
 n,p
 April-October
 
Thistles
 Cirsium spp.
 ann., bien., or per. herb
 feral
 n,p
 April-October
 
Tickseed
 Coreopsis lanceolata
 per. herb
 feral
 n
 April-June
 
Titi (Summer Titi)
 Cyrilla racemiflora
 shrub
 feral
 n,p
 April-July
 
Tulip Poplar
 Liriodendron tulipifera
 tree
 feral
 n,p
 April-June
 
Vetch
 Vicia spp.
 ann. or bien. herb
 cultivated forage
 n,p
 April-September
 
White Clover (White Dutch, Ladino)
 Trifolium repens
 per.
 cultivated forage
 n,p
 April-October
 
Yellow Rocket
 Barbarea vulgaris
 bien. or per. herb
 feral, sometimes noxious
 n,p
 April-June
 
Alfalfa
 Medicago sativa
 per. herb
 cultivated forage
 n,p
 May-October
 
American Beautyberry (French Mulberry)
 Callicarpa americana
 shrub
 feral, ornamental
 n
 May-June
 
Aster
 Aster spp.
 per. herb
 feral
 n,p
 May-November
 
Bermuda Grass
 Cynodon dactylon
 per. grass
 cultivated forage
 .
 May-November
 
Bitterweed
 Helenium amarum
 ann.
 feral
 n,p
 May-November
 
Carpet Grass
 Phyla nodiflora
 per. herb
 feral, groundcover
 n
 May-frost
 
Catalpa (Catawba)
 Catalpa spp.
 tree
 feral
 n,p
 May-June
 
Chinese Tallow Tree
 Sapium sebiferum
 tree
 ornamental
 n
 May-June
 
Grape
 Vitis spp.
 per. vine
 cultivated
 n,p
 May-July
 
Palmetto (Cabbage Palm)
 Sabal spp.
 palm
 feral
 n,p
 May-July
 
Palmetto (Saw Palmetto)
 Serenoa repens
 palm
 feral
 n,p
 May-July
 
Prickly Pear
 Opuntia spp.
 cacti, tree-like
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 May-June
 
Raspberry
 Rubus spp.
 shrub
 feral
 n,p
 May-June
 
Smartweed
 Polygonum spp.
 ann. or per. herb
 cultivated, feral, ornamental
 n,p
 May-November
 
Sorghum
 Sorghum bicolor
 ann.
 cultivated
 p
 May-October
 
Sourwood
 Oxydendrum arboreum
 tree
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 May-July
 
Spanish Needles
 Bidens spp.
 ann. or per. herb
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 May-November
 
Sumac
 Rhus spp.
 shrub, tree
 feral
 n,p
 May-September
 
Virginia Creeper
 Parthenocissus quinquefolia
 vine
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 May-August
 
Watermelon
 Citrullus lanatus
 ann.
 cultivated
 n,p
 May-August
 
Anise Hyssop
 Agastache spp.
 per. herb
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 June-September
 
Balloon Vine
 Cardiospermum halicacabum
 ann. or bien. vine
 feral, ornamental
 .
 June-August
 
Basswood
 Tilia spp.
 tree
 feral
 n,p
 June-July
 
Blue Vine
 Cynanchum laeve
 per. herb
 feral
 n,p
 June-September
 
Boneset (Joe-Pye Weed)
 Eupatorium spp.
 per. herb, shrub
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 June-November
 
Buckwheat
 Fagopyrum esculentum
 herb
 cultivated
 n,p
 June-frost
 
Buttonbush
 Cephalanthus spp.
 shrub, tree
 feral
 n,p
 June-September
 
Clethra (Sweet Pepperbush)
 Clethra alnifolia
 shrub
 feral
 n,p
 June-September
 
Cotton
 Gossypium spp.
 ann. herb
 cultivated
 n,p
 June-September
 
Cowpea
 Vigna unguiculata
 ann. herb
 cultivated
 n,p
 June-September
 
Cranberry
 Vaccinium macrocarpon
 evergreen
 cultivated, feral
 n,p
 June-July
 
Ironweed
 Vernonia spp.
 per. herb, shrub, tree
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 June-October
 
Lespedeza (Bush Clover)
 Lespedeza spp.
 per. herb, shrub
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 June-October
 
Lima Bean
 Phaseolus lunatus
 herb
 cultivated
 n,p
 June-July
 
Loosestrife (Purple Loosestrife)
 Lythrum salicaria
 per. herb
 cultivated, feral
 n,p
 June-September
 
Mexican Clover
 Richardia scabra
 ann. herb
 cultivated, feral
 n
 June-frost
 
Milkweed
 Asclepias spp.
 per. herb
 feral
 n
 June-August
 
Mint
 Mentha spp.
 per. herb
 cultivated, feral, ornamental
 n
 June-September
 
Partridge Pea
 Cassia fasciculata
 ann. herb
 feral
 n,p
 June-October
 
Prickly Ash
 Aralia spinosa
 shrub, tree
 feral
 n
 June-August
 
Star Thistle
 Centaurea spp.
 ann., bien., or per. herb
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 June-October
 
Sunflower
 Helianthus spp.
 ann. or per. herb
 cultivated ornamental and oilseed, feral
 n,p
 June-November
 
Vitex (Chaste Tree)
 Vitex spp.
 shrub, tree
 ornamental
 n,p
 June-July
 
Broomweed
 Gutierrezia texana
 per. herb
 feral
 .
 July-October
 
Goldenrod
 Solidago spp.
 per. herb
 feral
 n,p
 July-November
 
Ragweed
 Ambrosia spp.
 herb
 feral, often noxious
 p
 July-October
 
Snowvine
 Mikania scandens
 per. vine
 feral
 n,p
 July-frost
 
Soybean
 Glycine max
 ann. herb
 cultivated
 n,p
 July-October
 
Woodbine
 Clematis virginiana
 per. herb
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 July-September
 
Brazilian Pepper Tree
 Schinus terebinthifolius
 shrub, tree
 feral, ornamental, sometimes noxious
 .
 August-October
 
Crown-beard
 Verbesina spp.
 ann. or per. herb, shrub, tree
 feral
 n,p
 August-October
 
Matchweed (Snakeweed)
 Gutierrezia  sarothrae
 per. herb
 feral
 n,p
 August-October
 
Prairie clover
 Dalea spp.
 herb, shrub
 feral
 n,p
 September-October
 
Baccharis (Groundsel)
 Baccharis spp.
 shrub
 feral, ornamental
 n,p
 October-November
 
Strawberry
 Fragaria x ananassa
 per. herb
 cultivated,feral
 n,p
 December-May
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Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
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« Reply #19 on: August 05, 2005, 11:26:26 PM »

I think a good or great pollen plant is one that provides a high quality pollen in abundance and over an extended period during the growing season.
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