Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 22, 2014, 02:51:31 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Observation hive: single wide vs double? and ?'s about odors  (Read 1198 times)
windfall
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 355

Location: huntington,vt


« on: January 07, 2012, 08:37:02 AM »

So I am getting ready to build an observation hive. I spent the last couple of days digging around on old threads and such for the basic issues and designs now I have some questions:

Anybody want to outline the pros and cons of the single wide vs double wide configuration?

Obviously, 50% of the hive is hidden in the double wide arrangement, but I assume it is a slightly more "natural" set up for the bees to have at least one space bounded by comb on both sides....greater control of temp and humidity? Do owners of this hive type find the queen working the interior faces preferentially?
I also suppose it allows one to get more frames into a compact arrangement as well. From what I read more frames are easier to manage (especially for someone pretty new), with the limiting factor of weight when hauling the hive outside?

From what I gather so far, Bonterra seems to be the biggest (only?) proponent of the double wide arrangement. I like the basic design of the swing view and will most likely build some variation on that concept.

Separately, what about odors? Generally I have found that I really like the smells of the hives, but they do get funky and strong sometimes. In the interest of household peace, I would like to be able to either warn my wife, or build to eliminate the issue.

Is this an issue? I controlling venting can be tricky with OH. Do users find simple venting (internal to house) to be noticeable/problematic? Has anyone run separate venting to the exterior effectively?

Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13967


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2012, 10:06:22 AM »

>Anybody want to outline the pros and cons of the single wide vs double wide configuration?

If you always want to be able to find a queen, single.  For practice at finding a queen, for a lot of viewing of brood and caring for brood, you'll need the single.  Most of the brood will be in the middle and the queen will almost always be there.  For the reasons I have an observation hive, I want a single.

>Obviously, 50% of the hive is hidden in the double wide arrangement, but I assume it is a slightly more "natural" set up for the bees to have at least one space bounded by comb on both sides....greater control of temp and humidity?

Of course it's easier for the bees.  But then you lose much more than 50% as most of what goes on will be between.

>Do owners of this hive type find the queen working the interior faces preferentially?

Yes.

>I also suppose it allows one to get more frames into a compact arrangement as well. From what I read more frames are easier to manage (especially for someone pretty new), with the limiting factor of weight when hauling the hive outside?

Weight is my problem.  More than four deeps plus the weight of the hive (or five mediums) is too much.  Four mediums or three deeps works fine.

>Separately, what about odors? Generally I have found that I really like the smells of the hives, but they do get funky and strong sometimes. In the interest of household peace, I would like to be able to either warn my wife, or build to eliminate the issue.

The only time it has ever been a problem is when the hive died and got taken over by wax moths.  Then it smells.  Removing it when it dies or repopulating it would be the solution.

>Is this an issue? I controlling venting can be tricky with OH. Do users find simple venting (internal to house) to be noticeable/problematic? Has anyone run separate venting to the exterior effectively?

There is always the tube to the outside... but my vents are otherwise to the inside.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesobservationhives.htm
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
windfall
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 355

Location: huntington,vt


« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2012, 06:56:32 PM »

I sort of suspected that the inside faces would become "prime real estate"....definitely defeats most of the purpose.
thanks
Logged
Shanevrr
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 507

Location: Staunton VA


« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2012, 08:01:47 PM »

Im thinking about putting a tube to the outside on top and bottom and provide my ventalation without venting in room.  Ill just screen off upper entrance.  I may screen off bottom to get them flying high,  not sure yet.  And a single wide is harder to manange from no room to grow and swarming but I may use a trap out method to help with population/swarms once a month or so.  And im going with bonterra 5 frame single.  but I may add a frame or two and just make it taller.
Logged

www.Valleybeesupply.com
"A responsible beekeeper is a successful one"
Shane C.
ORoedel
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 29

Location: São Paulo, Brazil


« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2012, 04:04:48 AM »

The only problem I had with observation hives was the trash. If you have a ventilation or varroa bottom, you will need a drawer or something to clean.
I think better than the idea of ventilation pipes, is a varroa bottom with drawer.
A hive smell is so good! a mixture of wax and honey  Smiley

Better than 100 hives is one observation hive, you will learn so much!
Logged
windfall
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 355

Location: huntington,vt


« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2012, 09:26:05 AM »

I have been wondering about the "trash" and weather to have some way to remove like draweres below a #8 screen. But it seems most folks just let the bees handle it and clean out 1 or 2 times a year when working the hive.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.236 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page December 14, 2014, 02:21:14 AM
anything