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Author Topic: Protein Isolate  (Read 5419 times)
CapnChkn
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« Reply #40 on: December 26, 2011, 12:07:33 PM »

Boca,

http://www.elgon.se/story/elgonbee.htm

I'm reading this the best I can.  I can understand the protein has to be at a dynamic, if you could force-feed the bees the pure protein isolate they still wouldn't gain any benefit.  Once a level has been reached, adding more either will take extra effort to get any gain out of, or will simply be wasted.

I wasn't thinking in percentages.  I read on the nutrition label of the Soy flour:

14g Protein.

Of course this is in a 30g serving.  So, 7/15 is protein or 47%!  Hmmm.  Now this is great from the perspective of the Beekeeper, but I'm wondering about the Bee.  How does this set on their tummy-tums?  It can't be too bad, they'll eat it.

Well, it looks like I have my curriculum set for the next few months...

Thank you Everybody!
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"Thinking is like sin, them that doesn't is scairt of it, and them that does gets to liking it so much they can't quit!"  -Josh Billings.
Finski
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« Reply #41 on: December 26, 2011, 12:32:18 PM »

.
Is the bee carnivore or herbivore?

When horse or cow gets too much soya, it get a acute laminitis.
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rdy-b
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« Reply #42 on: December 26, 2011, 02:24:18 PM »

  Finski--I was going to send you 30lb package of sub to try--they tell me the cost
 to ship to HELSINKI is between $350-$380-- tongue-- Cry  RDY-B
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Finski
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« Reply #43 on: December 26, 2011, 02:42:17 PM »

.
That is expencive!

I found a chipment price " over 20 lbs package from USA to Fi  4 euros/ kg."  4 x 15 kg = 60 euros =80 US $

However, that makes no sence because HP100 is 2 euros/kg. I got free that 50 lbs sack.

http://usarahti.nettisivu.org/


However thanks!


 
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Finski
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« Reply #44 on: December 26, 2011, 04:56:36 PM »

.
I looked our soya isolate selling in internet. The  price was 15-20 $/kg. It is tremendous and makes no sense.
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rdy-b
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« Reply #45 on: December 26, 2011, 05:30:17 PM »

 you miss understand me i was NOT going to send soy isolate i was going to send
 a 30lb package of finished product mixed from recipe we use-it is the same supplement
 that the california beekeeper in the video uses--nutra bee-it is a great product and
dose not get hard-However UPS--FEDEX  gave me quotes of$350-380 american dollars
cost to send 30lb package fro here to HELSINKI-- rolleyes  very expensive shipping-
I know you have good recipe but you would like this --RDY-B
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Finski
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« Reply #46 on: December 26, 2011, 11:00:24 PM »

you miss understand me i was NOT going to send soy isolate i was going to send
 a 30lb package of finished product mixed

I understood correctly. It is really expencive to send even with cheap way.
I just try to look, how easy is to get isolate here and what is the price.

My HP100 is an animal forage. But it had quite much difficulties to get it from Holland to Finland.
It moved all the time "with some friend's friend"
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rdy-b
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« Reply #47 on: December 26, 2011, 11:55:33 PM »

  I have found a way to send by US POSTAL priority box-cant exced 20lb
 i will pay expense if you want some--RDY-B
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Finski
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« Reply #48 on: December 27, 2011, 11:29:05 AM »



it is interesting stuff. A smaller amount would be too possible to compare to my patty formula. BUT
a big hive consumes 1-1,5 lbs patty in a weeks.  My feeding period lasts 8 weeks, from first weeks
of April to the end of May. If it rains badly I feed more.

So, one big hive consumes patty 10 lbs in a Spring. - of which 50% is sugar..
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rdy-b
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« Reply #49 on: December 27, 2011, 01:42:54 PM »

yes i understand -i did not think you feed that much--from sept - oct i feed 2000lbs of sub
 its just opportunity to try something different-your mix will be fine-- Smiley RDY-B
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Finski
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« Reply #50 on: December 27, 2011, 03:07:52 PM »

yes i understand -i did not think you feed that much--from sept - oct i feed 2000lbs of sub
 its just opportunity to try something different-your mix will be fine-- Smiley RDY-B

In late Sept my hives are in wintersleep.  They stop brood rearing at the end of August. 2 years old queen stops 2 weeks earlier.  Winterfeeding restart brood rearing in small scale, about 2 frames of brood.
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rdy-b
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« Reply #51 on: December 27, 2011, 03:49:00 PM »

yes time difference is a challenge but you could feed after you pull honey-and then treat for varoa
before winter sleep--or maybe small hive is easier to winter in finland--here the large hives winter best-
condensation is problem with large hives--many bees breathing moist air from fog--RDY-B
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CapnChkn
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« Reply #52 on: December 27, 2011, 11:08:14 PM »

Quote
Is the bee carnivore or herbivore?

Strangely, I would have to say bees are incidental carnivores.  They don't intentionally hunt meat, but will eat the larvae and eggs if nothing else is available.  Chimpanzees and Gorillas will catch and eat small animals if the opportunity arises for added protein.  Humans actively hunt meat, so using this analogy, we could say the genetic "segue" of the bees, the wasps, got a taste for meat.

Of course with the hundreds of different species of bee, there would have to be one (there are three!) that gets nutrition from meat.
http://indianapublicmedia.org/amomentofscience/carnivorous-bees/
These aren't hunters either, but necrophages, scavangers.  It seems they will also eat the live young and eggs from abandoned wasp nests and toad eggs. 

I feel Ok with the source of food.  I don't know what the bees may think about egg yolks.  I would imagine if it was that bad for them they would reject it as tasting bad.  Egg yolks are probably not the best thing for a herbivore, but there's no simple easy source of vitellogenin I can think of besides.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitellogenin#Vitellogenin_and_honey_bees
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rdy-b
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« Reply #53 on: December 27, 2011, 11:54:02 PM »

 vitellogene is an egg yolk protein precurser, -it dosent come from eggs

**Egg yolks are probably not the best thing for a herbivore, but there's no simple easy source of vitellogenin I can think of besides.**

  POLLEN for bees -and any amino acid profile that is in that range--RDY-B

 
 
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rdy-b
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« Reply #54 on: December 28, 2011, 12:12:19 AM »


Strangely, I would have to say bees are incidental carnivores.  They don't intentionally hunt meat, but will eat the larvae and eggs if nothing else is available.  Chimpanzees and Gorillas will catch and eat small animals if the opportunity arises for added protein.  Humans actively hunt meat, so using this analogy, we could say the genetic "segue" of the bees, the wasps, got a taste for meat.

 
 HERES another twist for you  cheesy     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnivorous_plants
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Finski
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« Reply #55 on: December 28, 2011, 02:14:53 AM »

yes time difference is a challenge but you could feed after you pull honey-and then treat for varoa
before winter sleep--or maybe small hive is easier to winter in finland--here the large hives winter best-
condensation is problem with large hives--many bees breathing moist air from fog--RDY-B


You think too much. Small hives in winter is a mere nuisance. They have a value of a queen.

Big hives have no problems. And they start in Spring fine and are firsti reaty to catch yield.
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Finski
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« Reply #56 on: December 28, 2011, 02:18:39 AM »


 HERES another twist for you  cheesy     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnivorous_plants


I have reared quite much carnivorous plants. You may feed the fly trap with skimmed milk.
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