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Author Topic: Wild Hogs  (Read 8144 times)
JP
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I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


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« Reply #20 on: July 19, 2012, 08:45:08 AM »

I picked up a Marlin 22 magnum a few months ago from a pawn shop. Been looking for one of the older ones that have the metal trigger. They all come with plastic triggers now can you believe that?

I have it scoped now and get this its 17 yrs old and in perfect shape & I don't believe its ever been fired!

Come October 1, the wild pigs in our Honey Island Swamp better be on their toes cause I will be on the proll for fresh bacon!


...JP
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David McLeod
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« Reply #21 on: July 19, 2012, 09:00:40 AM »

... And what kind of shots would you give these hogs, 30-06,300 mag., 7.62 x 39 or what...

I have heard of folks in Hawaii using dogs to bay the beast and the hunter then rushing in with either a short spear or else a long machete.

One time about 30 years ago I helped a friend of mine "unload" a CSA Horse pistol he purchased or inherited (I forget which) from an old timer in Arkansas.  It required several #11 caps on most of the nipples but we got her discharged (unloaded that is). My friend told me the old man said that he carried his grand dad's Confiderate pistol to harvest the wild hogs that his dogs bayed.

The last will and testament of one of my maternal Great Grand fathers listed 34 head of ear notched or ear marked hogs running loose in the woods.

Even the Disney flick "Old Yellow" had a hog hunting or pig ear marking segment.

Ear marking wasn't that long ago. My grandfather would mark them and turn them out in the woods. Each family had their own mark and the rule was that when you rounded them up in the fall youi marked the shoats with the mark of the sow and you only marked shoats belonging to your sow. Grand dad passed in '68. He also was the last in the family to make a run of cane syrup.
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Georgia Wildlife Services,Inc
Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution
Atlanta (678) 572-8269 Macon (478) 227-4497
www.atlantawildliferemoval.net
georgiawildlifeservices@gmail.com
David McLeod
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« Reply #22 on: July 19, 2012, 09:24:18 AM »

Check out this site www.advancedtrap.com. That's Kirk Dekalb down in Moultrie, GA and no finer man you could find to do business with. His cage traps are the only cage trap I will use and I make my living with my traps, there are no better. His hog door is the way to go with hog traps since you need only buiy a door unit and then you can construct any size pen out of locally available materials. The simplest is to use t-posts and cattle panels, you really want to use the style called a sheep panel which is 5' tall and has a 4" opening to hold the shoats. Do not use anything less than 5' or they will go over the top and you want the pen to be round or teardrop. If it is square they will pile up in the corners and climb on each other to get out.
If you are going to trap them you need to set out with the goal of cating the whole sounder (herd). To do this you need to acclimate the hogs to the trap by prebaiting the pen with the door(s) wired open for a period of time. This is because the older wiser sows (hogs run in family groups of sows and shoats, the mature boars run seperately from the sows) will be the last to enter a pen, the young and dumb shoats will go right in. If you set the trap on the first night all you will do is catch a few dumb shoats and educate the sows. The best way to do a trapping is the wire open the doors and bait it heavily inside and outside and let them get used to coming to the bait. A trail camera is highly recommended to be able to see when they are readily entering the trap. As you refresh the bait quit putting bait outside the pen and put it only in the the back of the pen. When they are readily entering you can set the trap and you should snag the bulk of the sounder in short order.
Good baits are corn, soured or straight through straight will draw deer and turkey and soured will bring in the coons as well. Fresh raw peanuts are probably the most prefered bait in south georgia. Deer and turkey are best dealt with by having an open top penn they can jump or fly over and coons may need several cage traps to clear them out.
Once you have caught some pigs the very best bait is a pig. Construct an small pen to go in the bigger pen and pen up a medium sized shoat and you have your bait. Just be sure to put down plenty of feed and water as pigs will die easy on you in the heat. Ideally your trap will get shade during the heat of the day. Check your traps early for this reason. Do not let one die in the trap and if possible load the hogs live onto a trailer or truck and dispatch somewhere other than the trap to keep blood out of the area of the trap.
Hogs are one of the smarter critters you will run up against when trapping. Far more are educated to avoid traps than are caught in traps.
Now if you ever get serious about hog eradication check out this guys methods. www.jagerpro.com
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Georgia Wildlife Services,Inc
Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution
Atlanta (678) 572-8269 Macon (478) 227-4497
www.atlantawildliferemoval.net
georgiawildlifeservices@gmail.com
David McLeod
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« Reply #23 on: July 19, 2012, 09:33:22 AM »

JAGER PRO™ Thermal Hog Hunting (7)- 17 Hogs in One Night


This is a sample of Jager Pro's work.
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Georgia Wildlife Services,Inc
Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution
Atlanta (678) 572-8269 Macon (478) 227-4497
www.atlantawildliferemoval.net
georgiawildlifeservices@gmail.com
AllenF
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« Reply #24 on: July 19, 2012, 02:36:51 PM »

Fun in South GA.   
Hog Swat - Hunting Feral Hogs That Are Damaging Farm Fields

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AllenF
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« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2012, 02:41:07 PM »

Talk about shoot the one running at you first.     
WILD BOAR charges shooter! 5 pigs shot at night with a Scorpion 320 thermal sight.


« Last Edit: July 19, 2012, 03:01:34 PM by AllenF » Logged
BlueBee
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« Reply #26 on: July 19, 2012, 07:12:48 PM »

You can take hogs on your property by any means other than dynamite. Quote from a game warden once.    

Maybe I'll spray them with banana scent if they get near my hives  Smiley

There has been some huge ones sighted in my area, but I haven't seen one yet.  Sounds like Michigan is similar to GA with regards to hunting them; pretty liberal rules.   http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-153-10370_12145_55230-230093--,00.html
« Last Edit: July 19, 2012, 07:40:03 PM by BlueBee » Logged
AllenF
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« Reply #27 on: July 19, 2012, 09:01:44 PM »

I have read that the wild hog population here in Ga is growing by 20% every year.   
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David McLeod
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« Reply #28 on: July 19, 2012, 10:17:54 PM »

Allen, they are and expect to receive yours in the very near future. We have them here in Spalding and Henry counties. I have solid reports from both Newton and Rockdale that they are on the alcovy and yellow rivers. Newton, Fulton and Cobb have all rang my phone for hogs. It is a problem that many doubt can be solved. Fewer and aging hunters, hunters that refuse to shoot every pig but holding out for big boars when it's the sows that must go. With an animal that can produce three litters a year with more than a dozen per possible and able to begin doing so at less than a year you have major trouble. Combine this with the eradication of screw worms less than 50 years ago along with control of other diseases combined with major land use changes providing both more habitat and food stuffs.  You think these folks in the metro squall when the coyotes make a snack out of puddy tat just wait until a sounder roots there way across the lawn.
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Georgia Wildlife Services,Inc
Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution
Atlanta (678) 572-8269 Macon (478) 227-4497
www.atlantawildliferemoval.net
georgiawildlifeservices@gmail.com
David McLeod
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Location: Hampton

Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution


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« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2012, 10:21:08 PM »

Maybe the bears coming down from the mountains will help.
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Georgia Wildlife Services,Inc
Georgia's Full Service Wildlife Solution
Atlanta (678) 572-8269 Macon (478) 227-4497
www.atlantawildliferemoval.net
georgiawildlifeservices@gmail.com
Vance G
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« Reply #30 on: July 20, 2012, 01:16:58 AM »

How do those wild hogs taste?  I mean a young one, I know how an old boar pig tastes.  My dad made us eat one once and I have never forgiven him and he's been dead for years.
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Okytransplant
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Living the Good Life


« Reply #31 on: July 20, 2012, 03:30:18 PM »

Wonderful can't beat free
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JP
The Swarm King
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Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


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« Reply #32 on: July 20, 2012, 04:53:23 PM »

How do those wild hogs taste?  I mean a young one, I know how an old boar pig tastes.  My dad made us eat one once and I have never forgiven him and he's been dead for years.

They are delicious! I would describe them as a cross between venison and pork. They are obviously much leaner than domestic pork. If its a sow she can be any size for the taking but I usually go for the 150lb and under porklings no matter the sex. Some say older boars get a funny taste to 'em because of their hormones but I've had other people say they've enjoyed boars of all sizes just as well.


...JP
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"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
AllenF
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« Reply #33 on: July 20, 2012, 07:01:15 PM »

If you are worried about taste, trap them and run corn through them for a couple of weeks. 
I know a guy down in Dooly county that will only take them to the processor if they are under 100 pounds.   To me it sounds like a waste to shoot so much and leave them for buzzard food.   
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hardwood
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« Reply #34 on: July 20, 2012, 07:31:52 PM »

The boars have scent gland on the back of their hams that need to be removed while skinning or the meat will stink and taste foul. I trap and butcher 20-30 per year and would rather eat the sows (they usually have thicker bellies....better for curing bacon, and their hind quarters are better for curing hams). I won't pass up the boars but they take more care during slaughter.

Scott
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asprince
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« Reply #35 on: July 21, 2012, 06:53:08 PM »

I have killed and eaten lots of wild pigs. I shot a fairly large boar once and the smell was strong. We butchered it but every time we cooked the sausage I could smell that distinct odor. Other people said it tasted good but I could not eat it.

I had a friend that would trap them on his deer lease. He would castrate the males, cut off their tails and release them. He would instruct family and guests to only shoot if it was tailless.


Steve       
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kingbee
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« Reply #36 on: September 07, 2012, 10:59:24 PM »

The nice thing as well as the bad thing 'bout' feral hogs is that a domesticated pig once loose in nature can turn 100% wild in as little as 14 days. 
Without humans living in hand to mouth proximity to the land and competing up close and personal with feral hogs for all available resources, its going to be darn hard to deplete the wild pig population. 

All the Blue Grass songs about the black bear commonly known as, "Old Slew Foot" and his shoat catching ability is only true if the shoats "Old Slew Foot" catches and runs off with are already confined to someones' pig pen or maybe hog trap.  Other wise "Old Slew Foot" prefers to snatch Bambi from his cradle, suck wild turkey eggs, and eat bee brood.  Feral hogs also like the taste of Bambi, wild turkey eggs, and other foods that both bear and deer prefer, like acorns.  In my honest opinion this may well prove to be a limiting factor for black bears reestablishing themselves in their former range or to maintaining a healthy deer herd.   
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