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Author Topic: Turnip's  (Read 3185 times)
Irwin
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howdy all


« on: December 02, 2011, 06:35:04 PM »

Turnip storage how do you do it huh
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AllenF
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« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2011, 11:10:16 PM »

Here in the south, we leave the turnip in the ground and eat the greens (tops).   How long are you wanting to keep them?   Throw a few in the bottom of the fridge as you will need them.   
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asprince
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« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2011, 06:40:54 PM »

They will keep for several weeks if refrigerated.

I have eaten so many greens this year that the whites of my eyes have a green tint.
 
Good Luck,
Steve
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AllenF
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« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2011, 07:40:17 PM »

You need more corn bread and ham to even out the green eyes.
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asprince
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« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2011, 07:44:26 PM »

You need more corn bread and ham to even out the green eyes.

Yep. You got that right.

Steve
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Irwin
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« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2011, 02:23:15 PM »

Some body gave me a bucket of them with the top's cut off. Think I'll try canning some. And they gave me a bucket of parsnip's.
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AllenF
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« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2011, 06:38:23 PM »

They cut off the best part.   On canning, never hear of canning the root.   I know that the greens get canned all the time so I did some looking and found this.    Give it a try anyways to see and let us know. 

"Several references do not recommend canning turnips, but they do not state any reason. Freezing seems to be the method of choice.
 

There are published methods, however, for canning turnips commercially. These instructions stress the need to can only very small turnips (less than 1 1/2 inch in diameter). Anything larger is likely to become too fibrous and strongly flavored to make a satisfactory product.
 

The following instructions are adapted for parsnips, rutabagas and turnips from the Ball Blue Book (1995, Alltrista Corporation):
 

    Wash and prepare for cooking. Cut into desired size pieces.
    Cover vegetables in cold water. Bring to a boil and boil for three minutes.
    Pack hot vegetables into hot jars, leaving one-inch headspace.
    Ladle boiling water over the vegetables. Be sure to leave a one-inch headspace.
    Remove all air bubbles from the jar. A table knife or thin spatula pushed down along the sides of the jar can help with this process.
    Adjust two-piece lids according to manufacturer's directions.
    Process in pressure canner at 10 pounds of pressure (30 minutes for a pint and 35 minutes for a quart)."


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Irwin
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« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2011, 10:41:29 AM »

They cut off the best part.   On canning, never hear of canning the root.   I know that the greens get canned all the time so I did some looking and found this.    Give it a try anyways to see and let us know. 

"Several references do not recommend canning turnips, but they do not state any reason. Freezing seems to be the method of choice.
 

There are published methods, however, for canning turnips commercially. These instructions stress the need to can only very small turnips (less than 1 1/2 inch in diameter). Anything larger is likely to become too fibrous and strongly flavored to make a satisfactory product.
 

The following instructions are adapted for parsnips, rutabagas and turnips from the Ball Blue Book (1995, Alltrista Corporation):
 

    Wash and prepare for cooking. Cut into desired size pieces.
    Cover vegetables in cold water. Bring to a boil and boil for three minutes.
    Pack hot vegetables into hot jars, leaving one-inch headspace.
    Ladle boiling water over the vegetables. Be sure to leave a one-inch headspace.
    Remove all air bubbles from the jar. A table knife or thin spatula pushed down along the sides of the jar can help with this process.
    Adjust two-piece lids according to manufacturer's directions.
    Process in pressure canner at 10 pounds of pressure (30 minutes for a pint and 35 minutes for a quart)."



Thank's
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Joe D
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« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2012, 11:54:56 PM »

Turnip's are great, there are several kinds.  I usually plant purple top turnips, the roots are better.  I even mix turnip top and bottoms with some mustard greens, add a fried pork chop and some good corn bread(corn bread thats only about a inch and a half thick) not the thick stuff.  When theres not much to the tops, then you can just cook the roots.  As for canning, we just pick a big pot full, cookem and you eat some and freeze some.  Or you can just pick some, wash them, drain the water off, cut them up,and put them a gal freezer bag and freeze, then you can take them out of freezer and cook them.


Joe
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GSF
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« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2013, 03:26:01 PM »

We canned about 12 to 18 quarts of turnip roots last year. OMG you talk about strong! We couldn't handle it and threw them away.

The big concern with canning certain roots or vegetables is botulism. Certain things have to be pressure canned at a certain pressure for a certain time at a given altitude.

Back to eating.., Man, cook them roots, smash and soak in butter.., that's what dey call good!

Turnips, collards, mustard will bloom in the early spring. I didn't get bees until the summer so I can't really say if they work it or if you have to wait too long for it to bloom.
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iddee
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« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2013, 04:38:50 PM »

We can greens from a mixed garden. 7 or 8 different greens. We cut up a few turnips and mix with the greens. About 1 turnip per pint greens in the finished product.

YES, pressure can any and all non-acid veggies, all meats, and all fish.
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