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Author Topic: Varroa mite treatments, what works best?  (Read 3117 times)
allisono
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« on: November 13, 2011, 06:11:11 AM »

Hi All,

I just did a dusting to find that my varroa mite is at threshold and I am thinking I need to treat Sad  I haven't treated before other than by using regular powdered sugar dusting.  So, after doing a little reading, I am wondering what other bee keepers have used in the past and what they have had the best results with.  I'm thinking of using either apiguard or formic acid.  Keep in mind also that I am in North/Central Florida; I have some capped brood, though the numbers are low at this time of year.  My hive is pretty strong...

My other hive (only have 2) has a good mite count (it swarmed late in the season, but built up well), but I am also wondering if I am treating one hive if I should go ahead and do the other hive as well?  Or wait until I have a problem?  No sure if this is common practice given drifting bees, etc.?

Thanks in advance,

Allison
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Jim 134
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« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2011, 07:02:59 AM »

Hi All,

I just did a dusting to find that my varroa mite is at threshold and I am thinking I need to treat Sad  I haven't treated before other than by using regular powdered sugar dusting. 

Thanks in advance,

Allison

 What is regular powdered sugar dusting  huh


  BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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AliciaH
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« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2011, 03:53:05 PM »

If you are going to treat, I would treat them both.

I can't speak to what you should use.  First off, I think that depends more on your philosophies for how you want to manage your hives.  Secondly, treatments can be time and temperature dependant.

My first question when reading your post was, "Why only powdered sugar?"  Are you trying not to use chemicals but becoming fearful because your mite count is going up?

One of the great things about this site is the folks here will help you in whatever direction you want to go (or, tell you why you shouldn't!), but it would be helpful, I think, if we knew what you your medication philosophy was.
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VolunteerK9
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« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2011, 02:23:43 PM »

I just recently treated with oxalic-I cant give you specific numbers, but I had loads of dead mites as well as SHB's soon after treatment and for several days afterwards. When I do another treatment, it will be with oxalic again, just in vapor form. I havent used anything else before. Do a search on here for oxalic dribble and/or oxalic vapor. It's a quick and easy way to bleach your frames Wink
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allisono
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« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2011, 07:41:21 PM »

Hi All,

To answer questions...

What I meant by "regular" powdered sugar dustings is typically weekly or bi-weekly at worst.  There was also a period about a month ago that I did twice weekly powdered sugar dustings for 2-3 weeks as an Extension person suggested I do this to try and get my mite count down before winter sets in.  Keep in mind it was never bad really on either hive, highest I have had is in the 20's, but usually much fewer.  Though there has definitely been an explosion here lately from these earlier numbers Sad

And yes, I would very much like to keep away from chemicals as much as possible, though I am not entirely opposed to using them if a problem develops...

Thanks for the many different opinions here Smiley

Allison
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AliciaH
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« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2011, 11:14:22 PM »

Allison, my mite counts have definately jumped this fall, too.  To make things worse, I used a new treatment in September that didn't work so well for my hives so I'm going to try oxalic acid for the first time.  I'm more hopeful on that one since many here have used it with great success.  Now I just need to find it... Smiley



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JackM
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« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2011, 07:49:45 AM »

Quote
Now I just need to find it...
Which of course made me do a google and I find all sorts of Oxalic Acid out there.....  Is the stuff used for bleaching wood okay to use?  That should be very easy to find at a hardware store or big box home supply store.
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VolunteerK9
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« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2011, 08:36:45 AM »

....  Is the stuff used for bleaching wood okay to use?  That should be very easy to find at a hardware store or big box home supply store.

Yup, thats where you find it cuz after all, we want to make our frames look nice and new-killing mites is just a bonus Smiley












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Finski
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« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2011, 12:50:52 AM »

.

Europen Union Varroa Group made 10 years researches to sieve out best methods to treat varroa.

They are 
- formic acid   .... In late summer
- thymol ......in late summer
- oxalic acid  to broodless colonies and to swarms. 

Oxalic is only one what you may use in winter's cold temperatures.

Sugar dust does not work enough.

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