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Author Topic: Nectar after rain.  (Read 1554 times)
bernsad
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« on: November 11, 2011, 07:35:13 PM »

Hi guys,
Does anyone have an idea how long after rain, which usually washes the nectar out of flowers, before the nectar gets replenished and the girls can start harvesting something useful again? I'm thinking Eucalypts specifically but any flowers in general will do. I only ask because the local yellow box is flowering and after the heavy rains in Melbourne during the week I was wondering if the girls are still getting much out of it and if I need to whack on an extra super.
Thanks,
B
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bernsad
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« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2011, 09:12:47 PM »

Anyone got any thoughts/observations on this one?
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Scadsobees
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« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2011, 09:07:56 AM »

Hmm...I don't have much.  I have heard it takes anywhere from hours to days for flowers to replenish.  It probably depends in large part on the flower too.  A short lived flower won't be as affected as one that lives for days, is my guess.

I think one hard rain will wash it out, but there will be forage within a day in sunny weather.  Keep an eye on the hive, if they look like they need the extra super, go for it.  If in doubt, I always keep one or two extra on the hive.  I'd rather have an extra super on than have them run out or space.
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Rick
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« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2011, 11:39:49 AM »

I read one documentary where plants turn the nectar on and off so as to have the bees flying from flower to flower instead of staying at one flower and filling up. That helps the plant get pollen from another plant. The author talked about one of the plants he was studying adding nectar and then turning it off for 15 minute intervals over a couple of days. I'm sure all plants have there own schedules.
Jim
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"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain
bernsad
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« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2011, 06:04:19 PM »

I read one documentary where plants turn the nectar on and off so as to have the bees flying from flower to flower instead of staying at one flower and filling up. That helps the plant get pollen from another plant. The author talked about one of the plants he was studying adding nectar and then turning it off for 15 minute intervals over a couple of days. I'm sure all plants have there own schedules.
Jim
Really, I'd like to see that study, that's interesting!

And yes Scadsobees, I think I might put on an extra box. Thanks guys.
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Monster1970
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« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2011, 06:31:26 AM »

Bernsad,

Not sure how well the flow is going in Melbourne, but up here is Brisbane they are really starting to drag it in! We havent had any rain for a while now (acutally could do with some), but last time we had a storm I noticed the girls didnt seem to bother hitting the trees around the hive until the next day. The storm had passed through by about 3.00pm, so there was still plenty of sun left to collect if they had a mind to.
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dING
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« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2011, 06:19:35 PM »

Last year leatherwood season was very wet

Over the whole season

Result was a 50-70% drop in production
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Getting older dont make ya smarter just more cunning
bernsad
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« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2011, 07:52:10 PM »

Reports at the club meeting on Thurs. night indicate it is quite patchy around Melbourne, I'm doing pretty well though.

50%-70%, that's a hell of a hit.
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dING
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« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2011, 07:20:08 PM »

Drop in production was in the order of 200,000 kg I recollect seeing
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bernsad
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« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2011, 09:30:05 PM »

You're telling me I should savour the jar of leatherwood I've got in the cupboard at the moment. Or do I sell it on ebay to the highest bidder? lau
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dING
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« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2011, 05:16:00 PM »

Better hurry next leatherwood season starts January
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bernsad
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« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2011, 07:15:42 PM »

Good tip, thanks. Smiley
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