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Author Topic: looking for projects since i got my new table saw.. send me some ideas..  (Read 2158 times)
adamant
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« on: October 29, 2011, 04:24:02 PM »

think i may start making some of those plywood nucs..
looking for other ideas.. send me some with plans if u have any..
ant
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Sundog
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2011, 06:59:16 PM »

What kinds of plans are you looking for (how ambitious)?  Bee boxes or grandfather clocks?  There are many plans available online.

Personally, I like plywood the least.  Exterior grade is pricey and plywood is hard on tools.

It is fun!
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BlueBee
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2011, 09:54:15 PM »

If you want to get ambitious, you can make frames with a table saw.  It can be an interesting project for a hobbyist beekeeper.  I wouldn’t want to make 1000 frames, but a couple hundred can be a good education.  These are all homemade out of 1x8s with my table saw.   



ALWAYS respect the saw, especially if you haven’t used one much before.  Safety first always when around a saw.  Never drop your guard and never work when tired.  Remember that cutting small pieces (like for frames) can be more dangerous than making hive bodies, so be extra careful.
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rail
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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2011, 10:06:59 PM »

BlueBee,

What species of wood are you using for your frames?
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Sirach
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« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2011, 10:23:21 PM »

Rail, I use the 1x soft wood that is sold at the local hardware stores here; that’s Eastern White Pine.  In the south, a species of yellow pine might be more common, I don’t know.  I’m not a wood expert, so I don’t know if that was the wisest choice I could have made.  But what’s done is done grin  So far no problems.

I know we have some true wood experts on this forum, they might be able to give some better advice with regards to the best species of wood to use for frames. 
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bee-nuts
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« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2011, 10:40:22 PM »

what are you using for frame spacing there?  Interesting frames.  I wish I had a heated wood shop.  That was one of the projects I was supposed to get around to doing before winter came around.
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« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2011, 11:52:02 PM »

The colored things you see in the photo are round push pins from Staples.  They have some fancy name, but the name escapes me at the moment.  The round plastic push pins has a plastic diameter of 9mm which is = bee space.  The standard plastic push pins have 1/2“ long plastic tops. 

The round ones work nice since there is less surface area for the bees to propolize frame to frame.  There is just a point of contact between the ball and the next frame.  With standard push pins you have a larger flat surface for the bees to propolize and frames stick together a little stronger.  Worst of all is the standard wood spacers used in Hoffman style frames.  The bees can really glue them up good and the buildup propolis is a hassle to scape off...and a hassle to maintain frame to frame spacing.

Got the idea from Robo; he’s got lots of good ideas.
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« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2011, 12:50:32 AM »

Push pins of some kind was my first guess but I have never seen that style before.  I agree you probably get much less propolis but I dont think you can shove one of those frames into a tight squeeze.  Although if proplis is not a problem maybe that tight squeeze does not arise, hmm. 

As you are looking for a project, I think a nice observation should be on your list.  I have thought about either attaching several frames together to make one large frame or just building one large massive comb for an ob hive.  I dont like the fact that if you want to see the queen at all times you cant have stacks of two frames.  A double wide comb four high would give you 8 frames for brood and then you could have honey supers above (a production hive in your home, awesome!).  Not saying thats the way to go but its something you can be creative with.  What would be really cool would bee three stacks of 4 deep combs connected in a the shape of a peace symbol on a turn table giving you twelve deep brood frames to observe.
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JackM
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« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2011, 08:16:36 AM »

Let me reiterate,
ALWAYS respect the saw, especially if you haven’t used one much before.  Safety first always when around a saw.  Never drop your guard and never work when tired.  Remember that cutting small pieces (like for frames) can be more dangerous than making hive bodies, so be extra careful.

I have been using a table saw since I was 12 years old, so 40 + years of experience.  I almost lost a finger recently from getting careless and having a kickback.  The blade never touched me.  The end of my finger was just hanging by skin.  Respect the power, not just the blade

My point is, never forget that advice
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bee-nuts
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« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2011, 05:42:17 PM »

Jack, injury from power tools happen to other people.  Until one actually gets bit, they dont pay attention to all the safety advice. 

I almost lost my thumb.  I worked around power tools every day for many years.  I felt at home around them and lost all fear really.  Working with them becomes like riding a bike until in disbelief "did I just cut my thumb off" lol!

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Grieth
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« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2011, 07:29:13 AM »

Adamant,

I found that buying deeps is not much more cost than buying other sizes.  I have been using the bench saw to cut down the new deeps, leaving pieces for other hive parts, like roofs, slatted bottom boards, or half a deep is right for wooden comb boxes.  Not really a project, but a handy use for the bench saw.

Also, you could cut a deep in half, and with some ply make a bee vac (haven't got to that yet myself as not much need in the suburbs). 

I also thought about a ply carry all, to hold smoker, pine needles, lighter, hive tool, made so I could sit on it by a hive.  Not designed anything yet.

Hope these ideas help.  Would love to photos of anything you make!

Grieth
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bulldog
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« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2011, 11:56:11 AM »

good advice jack.

let me just ad my $0.02 if i may

my biggest rules  for a table saw are as follows:

1. ALWAYS protect your eyes. this may seem so simple it doesn't need to be said, but someone told me this once.
"you can chew your food with false teeth, you can walk on a wooden leg, but you can't see out of a glass eye"

2. ALWAYS hold the piece FIRMLY, this will reduce the possibility of the blade ripping the piece from your hands and sending it someplace unintended.

3. ALWAYS let the BLADE do the cutting, if you feel yourself pushing too hard you are in imminent danger. if it starts to bind, back the piece out slowly ( remembering to hold the piece firmly ) and try again, better to mess up a cheap piece of wood than an irreplaceable body part.

4. when doing many repititious cuts one has a tendency to speed up over time, this is where accidents can occur. complacency or carelessness cause more injuries than inexperience.

5. if you are not comfortable performing a particular cut on the saw, find another way to do it, use a push bar, a push stick, featherboard, build a jig of some kind, etc. keep hands and fingers away from the blade at all times.

6. Remember, nobody needs your fingers more than you do, so protect them.


hope this helps.
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rail
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« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2011, 05:36:19 PM »

Rail, I use the 1x soft wood that is sold at the local hardware stores here; that’s Eastern White Pine.  In the south, a species of yellow pine might be more common, I don’t know.  I’m not a wood expert, so I don’t know if that was the wisest choice I could have made.  But what’s done is done grin  So far no problems.

I know we have some true wood experts on this forum, they might be able to give some better advice with regards to the best species of wood to use for frames. 


I had thought about using Birch for frames.

Has anyone used Yellow Pine for hive bodies?
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Sirach
rail
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« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2011, 05:40:08 PM »

think i may start making some of those plywood nucs..
looking for other ideas.. send me some with plans if u have any..
ant

What brand of saw did you purchase?

I need to purchase another saw, the Craftsman Moulding Cutters will not work with my bench style table saw.
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Sirach
RayMarler
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« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2011, 01:04:47 AM »

True division boards, that actually do split the box with no space around the edges.
Follower boards come in handy. They are like division boards but have a beespace around the sides.
True division board feeders would be really nice to split a box into nucs with each half having access to their chamber of the feeder.
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Jim 134
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« Reply #15 on: November 02, 2011, 06:11:00 AM »

good advice jack.

let me just ad my $0.02 if i may

my biggest rules  for a table saw are as follows:

1. ALWAYS protect your eyes. this may seem so simple it doesn't need to be said, but someone told me this once.
"you can chew your food with false teeth, you can walk on a wooden leg, but you can't see out of a glass eye"

2. ALWAYS hold the piece FIRMLY, this will reduce the possibility of the blade ripping the piece from your hands and sending it someplace unintended.

3. ALWAYS let the BLADE do the cutting, if you feel yourself pushing too hard you are in imminent danger. if it starts to bind, back the piece out slowly ( remembering to hold the piece firmly ) and try again, better to mess up a cheap piece of wood than an irreplaceable body part.

4. when doing many repititious cuts one has a tendency to speed up over time, this is where accidents can occur. complacency or carelessness cause more injuries than inexperience.

5. if you are not comfortable performing a particular cut on the saw, find another way to do it, use a push bar, a push stick, featherboard, build a jig of some kind, etc. keep hands and fingers away from the blade at all times.

6. Remember, nobody needs your fingers more than you do, so protect them.


hope this helps.




 If you like you'r fingers get this saw Just my $0.02

http://youtu.be/FbndZtkfcqs

http://www.sawstop.com/ 

 BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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JackM
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« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2011, 08:40:19 AM »

Slatted Rack
Bee Vac with internal catch box (Removabe).....my next project.  Will have that fit inside an empty medium super that is part of vac already.
Bottoms
Tops, including decorative roof-type tops
Top or Bottom feeder
Jewelry boxes.
Tool box (carry about).

My imagination just dwindled.
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specialkayme
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« Reply #17 on: November 26, 2011, 12:39:49 PM »

I always wanted to try and make a quilt box for a lang. Along with a division board feeder, robber screens (with oneway escape cones for moving purposes), and decorative hive tops.
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