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Author Topic: New Beek 8-Frames Question  (Read 986 times)
oblib
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« on: October 25, 2011, 08:56:16 PM »

       I will be starting my new hobby of beekeeping in the spring. After lurking here for months I have decided to go 8-frame mediums for all woodenware for ease on my back, brood nest size and total interchangeability of all equipment.

      I will build all of my own equipment except for the frames.

      I will never loan or borrow equipment from anyone.

      I will eventually build some/all of my frames but plan to buy all in the beginning and from time to time will possibly buy some even after I begin to build my own.

      My question is, given the above, would you.....
     1. Build to the standard 8-frame dimensions and just try to keep the frames spaced properly.
     2. Build to the standard 8-frame dimensions and shave frames to fit 9 properly spaced.
     3. Build the proper size to fit 8 frames spaced properly and to heck with the standard as the only thing I will ever buy is frames.
     4. Build the proper size to fit 9 frames spaced properly again to heck with the standard.
     5. None of the above, I would do this........

     Thanks in advance for your input.
    
« Last Edit: October 25, 2011, 10:31:47 PM by oblib » Logged
BlueBee
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« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2011, 10:30:11 PM »

Given your pre-conditions, I would select choice #1 or #2.

I would recommend building your hives to a standard size for the following reasons:

1.  Makes it easier to hold a hive top feeders.  You can make wood feeders (I have), but plastic is more water proof!
2.  You might want to buy a queen excluder or cloak board at some point and they fit standard sized boxes better.
3.  You might want to sell one of your hives at some point.  It will be easier to sell if it is standard size.

As for spacing, I’ve used both the standard 35mm spacing and a more narrower 33mm spacing.  9 narrow frames fits nicely in a standard sized 8 frame box.  You get more brood per box that way.  
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indypartridge
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« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2011, 06:11:55 AM »

I agree with BlueBee, build to the standard sizes. If we were good at predicting the future, we'd all be rich. Words like "I will never" always seem to come back to bite us.

Even if you never "borrow", would you pass up an awesome deal on some 8-frame equipment if the opportunity arose? Building to standard sizes gives you flexibility if things change.
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BlevinsBees
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« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2011, 01:30:25 PM »

You also may not have time to build boxes with a major flow going on and need to order some quickly.
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oblib
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« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2011, 01:37:39 PM »

     Ok, I'm pretty well convinced to go with standard dimensions. Now to shave frames or not..... Seems i remember MB posting something about a frame that would slip into the extra space and not have to shave frames, got to see if I can find it.

Thanks for the replies so far.
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BlueBee
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« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2011, 09:20:32 PM »

Standard 8 frame box inner dimension is 311mm.  All the frames I’ve ever bought have Hoffman spacers that are 35mm wide.  311mm/35mm = 8.89 frames per box.  That is very close to being able to shove a 9th frame in, but not close enough.

Yes, there might be some brand of frame that is 34mm wide and then you could shove 9 into a box.  However you would then only have 5mm of slop to manipulate your frames.  That makes it nearly impossible to pull out a frame without rolling and killing some bees.  It is bad thing if you kill your queen.

I start inspections by pulling the frame at an end first.  If you roll bees there it’s not a big deal since the queen is very unlikely to be on the outside of an outside frame.  However it is just downright annoying to work in a box without enough slop on the ends to easily pull out frames. 

If you want to experiment with narrow frames, I would build my own of buy ones that are made with 32 or 33 mm spacing.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2011, 02:32:41 PM »

>I will build all of my own equipment except for the frames.

It's usually cheaper (unless you have access to free wood scraps or a lumber mill) to buy the boxes already made.

>      I will never loan or borrow equipment from anyone.

I loan and borrow and get used equipment all the time...

>     I will eventually build some/all of my frames but plan to buy all in the beginning and from time to time will possibly buy some even after I begin to build my own.

I don't build frames, but I do have a motivation to do so as I could build them foundationless and the width I want, 32mm. (1 1/4")

 >    1. Build to the standard 8-frame dimensions and just try to keep the frames spaced properly.

That works fine.

>     2. Build to the standard 8-frame dimensions and shave frames to fit 9 properly spaced.

That works better, but is more work.

>     3. Build the proper size to fit 8 frames spaced properly and to heck with the standard as the only thing I will ever buy is frames.

I wouldn't.  As already mentioned if you go with standard size (between 13 3/4" and 14") you'll be able to buy hive top feeders, excluders etc.

>     4. Build the proper size to fit 9 frames spaced properly again to heck with the standard.

Same as above.

I'd buy all the boxes (unless you have free lumber available) as it is cheaper, not to mention easier.  Mann Lake has free shipping, last I heard... I'd stick with either the 14" wide ones (Mann Lake's size) or the 13 3/4" ones (Miller Bee Supply and Brushy Mt. size).  I'd probably buy the standard frames and shave them down, unless you feel rambunctious, in which case i would build frames that are 1/8" shorter width for all parts.
 
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Michael Bush
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oblib
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« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2011, 05:39:28 PM »

Yeah I have access to free wood and a lumbermill grin so for all the reasons suggested to me in this thread I gonna build to standard 8 frame size, buy and shave the frames to fit 9. Also, after they draw out the first box of foundation I will be checkerboarding with foundationsless.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2011, 08:15:01 AM »

If I had free scrap lumber, I would definitely build your own boxes then.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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