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Author Topic: 1st tree cutout  (Read 1002 times)
Meadlover
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« on: October 25, 2011, 08:21:01 PM »

OK, got my 1st swarm call this year and it's a hive in a tree trunk. Haven't done a tree cutout before and only 1 other cutout so I'm looking for a little bit of advice. Here's some details (all this is just from a phone call so I won't know more until I get there) :

Apparantly the tree is approx 40" diameter?!  shocked
The tree trunk snapped last night and is lying on the ground with the bees in the broken off trunk on the ground.
It is located at a golf course and they have shut 2 holes until the bees are removed.
I can't get there until 5pm at the earliest. (Sunset is around 6pm, last light around 6:30pm)
It is predicted to storm this arvo/evening (I know I know - crank bees)

I have a small chainsaw, wedge, log splitter, and general tools.

I have accepted if I try to do this cutout this afternoon I will be working into the dark with CRANKY bees, but it sounds like if I don't get rid of the bees tonight they will have them killed tomorrow as they don't want to have the holes closed any longer than they have to.

My plan currently is to drill into the tree to find where the hive starts and finishes.
Plunge cut into the trunk, then split or cut wedges out of the trunk to expose the hive.
Remove brood and lacky band into frames.
Leave the box next to the trunk & hope if I have the queen they will move into the new hive.

Any advice or ideas on this one?
Thanks

ML
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iddee
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« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2011, 08:42:20 PM »

First, saw above the hive a few feet. Saw completely. If wood is solid, cut a large piece toward the hive. If black and pithy, cut a small piece away. Again, until the hive is found. Same on the other end if needed. Stop sawing at this point.

Using wedges, split the hive log into two pieces. Proceed as you outlined above.

First 8 pics in this link will give you an idea of what I'm saying.

http://s81.photobucket.com/albums/j226/Iddee/removals/
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
Meadlover
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« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2011, 09:08:50 PM »

Thanks iddee, I looked over those photos this morning plus some of your other posts associated with tree cutouts which gave me a much better idea on what/how to do this.
I've only had a chainsaw for a few months so still building my saw skills. If it's a 40" diameter trunk I don't know if I'll be able to split it in half?
Is it much harder to remove wedges without splitting the trunk in half? I saw some photos of one of JPs log cutouts and thought that would be the way to go if I can't split it in half?

How do you think it will go working into the dark? Obviously they will be cranky, but with a red torch for some light is it do-able?
I travel an hour home from the city each day so I don't have too many other options.

Thanks

ML
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iddee
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« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2011, 09:33:11 PM »

Looking at the end of the log, cut as deep as you can across it, from 9 O'clock to 3 O'clock. Then split it with wedges at 10 O'clock and 2 O'clock. Remove that piece. If more needs removed, move the saw 6 inches toward the cut and cut from 9 O'clock to the ground and 3 O'clock to the ground Then split at 6 O'clock. Cut as much comb out as quickly as possible and place the brood in hive. Try to empty the log. Leave until the next evening and all bees will go in the hive, including the queen.  """OR THEY WILL ABSCOND"""

Either way, the job will be done. Collect your money and go home.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
Meadlover
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« Reply #4 on: October 25, 2011, 11:33:50 PM »

Thanks iddee.
The wedges you use - are they specific splitting wedges or the same wedges used for felling trees to stop the saw pinching?
I have 1 nylon wedge for tree felling, and if they suffice I might buy another couple for the job.

Thanks

ML
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G3farms
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« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2011, 08:48:45 AM »

The wedges he is talking about are steel splitting wedges, made for splitting fire wood.

Another idea is to take the log with you. If the golf course has a tractor with a front end loader or boom pole (and it is big enough to handle the size of the tree trunk) load it on a trailer and take it home. I use an old bed sheet and duct tape to cover over the holes in the tree.





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see my swarms and cut outs at https://www.youtube.com/user/soapy22bullet?feature=mhee

those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

Bees will be bees and do as they please!
JackM
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« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2011, 09:25:25 AM »

The wedges he is talking about are steel splitting wedges, made for splitting fire wood.

Another idea is to take the log with you. If the golf course has a tractor with a front end loader or boom pole (and it is big enough to handle the size of the tree trunk) load it on a trailer and take it home. I use an old bed sheet and duct tape to cover over the holes in the tree.






Sounds a lot more sensible to me and no rushing that way
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2011, 01:22:26 PM »

Another idea is to take the log with you. If the golf course has a tractor with a front end loader or boom pole (and it is big enough to handle the size of the tree trunk) load it on a trailer and take it home. I use an old bed sheet and duct tape to cover over the holes in the tree.

I agree, especially since it will be at night and most of the bees will bee inside. I did the same thing with a squirrel house that the bees took over. They had so much comb built in it that I am leaving them in there until the spring.
Jim
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Meadlover
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« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2011, 06:28:26 AM »

Thanks for the info guys.
Ends up the tree was MASSIVE! around 1-1.5m (3-6ft) in diameter.
My little saw had trouble cutting through it and I was racing the sun as I could only get there after work. Unfortunately the sun won the race and I had to leave the hive Sad
Due to the golf club having to close 2 holes for the day they didn't want to wait until the weekend so had the hive destroyed  Cry

It was a valuable learning experience but unfortunate that I couldn't get the hive out.

ML
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