Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 29, 2014, 04:06:24 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Black v. Natural - Does it matter?  (Read 1191 times)
Country Heart
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 225


Location: San Jose, California


« on: October 19, 2011, 11:09:36 PM »

Newbie here. 

Looking through my catalogs trying to understand all the various equipment options out there.  I see that plastic frames and foundation come in "black" and "natural" and I am wondering what the pro's and con's are of each? 
Logged
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4133

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2011, 12:03:08 AM »

I’ll throw out a couple of points:

Black Pro:  You can see eggs MUCH better than with white.  Very good for brood chamber.
Black Con: Don’t set them in the sun for long or they quickly warp.
White Pro:  You can see the color or your honey better.
White Con:  You can’t see any eggs the queen might be laying in the supers.

I have both, not really by choice.  I would have preferred all black.  In my hives, the bees have shown no preference to one color vs the other.  It is dark inside the hive and hence they probably all appear black to the bees!

If you are going to treat your bees with chemicals, it can be useful to have blacks and whites so you can delineate which frames have been treated and belong in the brood chamber.
Logged
Country Heart
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 225


Location: San Jose, California


« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2011, 01:00:56 AM »

Thank you BlueBee for the helpful insight.

There are so many equipment options out there.  Little by little this site is helping me get a handle on better understanding what's available and what might work best for me.
Logged
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4133

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2011, 01:31:32 AM »

If you are also debating black or white plastic frames vs wood frames with b/w plastic foundation there are a few more pros and cons to weigh

All Plastic Frames (black or white)
Pro:  Low cost
Pro:  No assembly required.  Just pop them in the bee hive.
Pro:  You can get them in 4.9 small cell size if you want to go the small cell route.
Con:  You gotta keep them out of the sun or they warp. 
Con:  There are lots of nooks and crannies in them for small hive beetles to hide if you live in a SHB area.
Con:  You may have to paint a thicker coat of bees wax on them to get the bees to comb them out.

Wood Frames w/plastic foundation (black or white)
Pro:  Much more rigid than the all plastic frames.
Con:  Much more labor involved in putting them together.
Con:  Not sure if they sell plastic foundation in small cell if you are interested in that.
Con:  You may also have to coat the foundation with extra bees wax to get them to comb it out.

I have about every combination and they can all work.  Like with a lot of bee keeping, a lot of decisions come down to personal preferences.  My best advice would be to not go overboard in the beginning buying a ton of parts.  You may end up discovering later you want to go a different direction. 
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13583


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2011, 11:25:32 AM »

In the dark of the hive the bees can't see the difference.  But you can see eggs better on black and you can tell the color of the honey to sort it when extracting better with white.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Country Heart
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 225


Location: San Jose, California


« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2011, 02:07:23 AM »

I'm considering going with dark foundation in the brood area (to best see the eggs) and light foundation in the super (to better see the honey) - however I would also like to mix in some foundationless frames.

How about if I built the brood area mixing dark plastic frame/foundation with foundationless wood frames. 
Then I would build the super area mixing light plastic frame/foundation and foundationless wood.

Do you think this might work? 
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13583


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2011, 12:00:23 PM »

Foundationless mixed in the brood nest works fine because brood combs are of uniform thickness.  I may be more unpredictable in the supers because honey combs are of variable thickness.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Country Heart
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 225


Location: San Jose, California


« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2011, 05:46:59 PM »

Oh, I didn't realize that.  Maybe just one with foundation in the super then, to encourage them to build straight, and the rest foundationless.
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13583


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2011, 06:21:33 PM »

The main thing is that the foundationless needs a guide, not just frames with no foundation...

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoundationless.htm
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Country Heart
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 225


Location: San Jose, California


« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2011, 07:00:09 PM »

Got it, thanks.  Love your site!   Smiley
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.152 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 26, 2014, 05:30:09 PM