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Author Topic: IF I DECIDE TO FEED SUGAR SYRUP WILL THEY STILL FORAGE OUT IN THE FIELD AND CHOS  (Read 974 times)
adamant
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« on: September 25, 2011, 12:31:19 PM »

chose not to eat the syrup and take advantage of the nectar thats out there?
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yockey5
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« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2011, 01:10:31 PM »

Mine have continued to forage as they took in the sugar syrup.
The aster is in bloom now, but rains have moved in. I an no longer feeding as the hives are pretty much full of stores.
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T Beek
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« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2011, 05:40:39 PM »

I began open feeding about 2 1/2 weeks ago, but my bees didn't really start to get at it until there was little if anything left for them, about a week now (goldenrods are done, asters are close).  All that's left flowering in our garden is some purple mallows, that my bees usually love and some late blooming rambling roses, but bees are pretty much ignoring both over the syrup right now.  All my colonies are busy with activity bringing in the syrup.  My LONG Hive colony is still throwing out drones.

With the extended forecast looking at pleasent weather (above average temps) for next ten days, I'll be needing more sugar, that's for sure. 

I honestly can't wait for winter.

thomas
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"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
bee-nuts
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« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2011, 07:28:34 PM »

Yes they will still forage for nectar.  My aster is at its peak right now and they are actually getting something out of it unlike g-rod this season.  I am really hopeing that we get the above average weather tbeek speaks of and the bees can put up 10 or 15 pounds of honey from it.  My bees are way to light this season and are in need of some serious feeding.

Im ready for a break too T-Beek.  Working before work many days, and working on my days off gets old after a while, lol!
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The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson
Picobrew
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« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2011, 01:43:11 AM »

Earlier today I was pleased to see them gathering pollen at the same time they are taking syrup.  I like the idea of a warm forecast but I'm told I've just about spent my sugar allowance. Undecided

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I think cayenne, I think cayenne.
FRAMEshift
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« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2011, 10:12:31 AM »

Picobrew, that's an interesting hive design you have.  I'd like to hear more about it and maybe see some pictures from different angles, inside etc.
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"You never can tell with bees."  --  Winnie-the-Pooh
T Beek
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« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2011, 10:26:44 AM »

Me too.

thomas
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greenbtree
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« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2011, 08:36:09 PM »

We still have late goldenrod and aster blooming - and I have been feeding syrup.  My bees still very actively forage on nice days even though they have syrup right in their hives (empty deeps and mason jars).  My hives just REEK of dirty socks, so they are really bringing in the goldenrod here - we must have ended up with a good flow.

JC
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"Rise again, rise again - though your heart it be broken, or life about to end.  No matter what you've lost, be it a home, a love, a friend, like the Mary Ellen Carter rise again!"
luvin honey
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« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2011, 10:02:38 PM »

We still have late goldenrod and aster blooming - and I have been feeding syrup.  My bees still very actively forage on nice days even though they have syrup right in their hives (empty deeps and mason jars).  My hives just REEK of dirty socks, so they are really bringing in the goldenrod here - we must have ended up with a good flow.

JC
Ditto on everything here. They're taking 1 quart of 2:1 syrup per day, plus foraging like absolutely crazy. My first experience with the stinky sock hive smell, which I can smell from a couple yards away! They threw out drones and are piling in nectar and pollen. Hope they can store up enough in time!
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The pedigree of honey
Does not concern the bee;
A clover, any time, to him
Is aristocracy.
---Emily Dickinson
Picobrew
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« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2011, 01:58:20 AM »

Picobrew, that's an interesting hive design you have.  I'd like to hear more about it and maybe see some pictures from different angles, inside etc.

I believe I can post a few links without highjacking the thread or starting a debate about top bar hives.

When I started reading about bees and beekeeping a stumbled upon the concept of the top bar hive.  It sounded right for me at this time.  I've made errors but I'm still pleased with the concept and intend to construct 2 additional hives this winter.  I stuck pretty closely to the free plans available at a website I don't seem to be able to mention by name.  If one searches for top bar hive UK you can find it.  I also spend time on the forum there.  I use the same handle so you could relive my growing pains if you wish.

My largest hurdle was not having anyone local to ask questions specific to this hive type.

Here is a link to a photo album.  album
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I think cayenne, I think cayenne.
T Beek
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« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2011, 06:19:44 AM »

Thanks Picobrew;  Although I gave my top bar hives away a few years ago when I made the switch to all mediums (frames/supers) I loved working them and they taught me to become a better, more observant beek.  You'll get no debate from me. 

And now I have the best of both with my LONG HIVES (also building more).

thomas
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"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
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