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Author Topic: losing hives overwinter  (Read 4157 times)
derekm
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« Reply #40 on: August 27, 2011, 03:17:34 PM »

you can see them at http://www.beekeepingforum.co.uk/all_albums.php
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If they increased energy bill for your home by a factor of 4.5 would you consider that cruel? If so why are you doing that to your bees?
Finski
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« Reply #41 on: August 28, 2011, 11:47:54 AM »

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ENTRANCE VENTILATION

When summer is over and the hives have 1-2 boxes, I use  size on main entrance 10 cm x 0,8 cm. Then one upper entarance in front wall. I may push my small finger to the hole.

So, that had been enough to my hives.

Many beekeepers are mad with their mesh floor. Like many say, it is "a modern bloor". Nonsence, it come with varroa and it is called often varroa floor.
*ll*lll*

if you have a mesh floor, you need not upper entrance.

...,.........

We have in winter a proverb: shut the door, it is byed heat!..

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Finski
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« Reply #42 on: August 28, 2011, 11:52:04 AM »

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I have seen many times in the middle of winter, when temp is near zero and snow is wet, a bee ventilates with its wings inside the of upper entrance.
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hvac professor
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« Reply #43 on: August 28, 2011, 01:33:13 PM »

Finski, I have 5 deep boxes on my 1st year hive as I mentioned before, I will be extracting sometime this week because Irene is dumping lots of rain today. Assuming hives are full of bees and honey you believe that I should still drop down to 1-2 boxes for winter?

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T Beek
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« Reply #44 on: August 28, 2011, 06:00:55 PM »

Especially in cold climates, condencing/squeezing bees down is neccessary for survival, meaning;  "Leave no empty boxes or frames on hives over winter." 

It is wasted space.  Up here we've already begun the process.  It also really affords the ability to get a last good inspection in before winter.

We get pretty cold up here and our winters typically last more than six months.  If it were'nt for DRY SUGAR my bees would've starved on many occasions. 

That brings up the most important point of this conversation.  All Beekeeping is Local.  What works in North Wisconsin may not work in Finland or Florida.  Take all advise at your own risk.

thomas
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"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Finski
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« Reply #45 on: August 28, 2011, 07:07:34 PM »

Finski, I have 5 deep boxes on my 1st year hive as I mentioned before, I will be extracting sometime this week because Irene is dumping lots of rain today. Assuming hives are full of bees and honey you believe that I should still drop down to 1-2 boxes for winter?



i am during it just now at the level of Anchorage. I do not believe that  that New York climate is in same situation.



When the flowers are away and plants prepare themselves to winter, foraging bees die rapidly on fields.

When I take honey frames off now, there are only few bees on honey frames. Bees are by themselves in two box around brood frames. It is very easy to meke decision, one or two.
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Finski
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« Reply #46 on: August 28, 2011, 07:26:46 PM »



That brings up the most important point of this conversation.  All Beekeeping is Local.  What works in North Wisconsin may not work in Finland or Florida.  Take all advise at your own risk.


that is the point. And every hive is individual. Does it have 5 or 15 frames brood.

Advices is not a risk. Risk is if you do not use your O W N brains.

We are changing here ideas. 

you may follow the idea that give to the hive 3 wintering boxes and 60 kg food, ooooorrrr
press into one insulated box and feed 20 kg sugar as syrup.

They are your hives. You may give to them  mere honey and they consume your all honey + dry sugar too.

MOST importat, to be succesfull, you must have a bee stock which react in proper way that fall is coming.
I have read that in Britain New Zealand bees are splended but in my climate none on then survive over winter what ever you do.

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stella
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« Reply #47 on: August 28, 2011, 09:51:22 PM »

Does anyone wrap their hives in fiberglass?
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“The hum of bees is the voice of the garden.” — Elizabeth Lawrence
BlueBee
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« Reply #48 on: August 28, 2011, 10:13:50 PM »

I don’t, but knowing bee keeping, there is always somebody keeping bees in every manner conceivable to man..... 

An obvious problem with fiberglass is it loses its insulation value if it gets wet.  Maybe if you wrapped your hive in insulation, then covered it with a big plastic garbage bag and cut holes for top and bottom vent/entrances, it might work. 

Keeping a garbage bag on the hive might prove difficult with the wind during a mid west winter.  You could try strapping the bag over the fiberglass, but if you compress the fiberglass too much, you end up reducing its insulation capabilities.

Fiberglass might also make a nice nest for mice. 

I’ve never tried it, just listing some things I would worry about.
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Finski
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« Reply #49 on: August 29, 2011, 02:10:22 AM »

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Glassfiber - no....

I use polyhives and then I make wind and snow protection from geotextile.

Now I ad bird net, because wood peckers have learner to make holes in hives.
They make holes even in summer.
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T Beek
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« Reply #50 on: August 29, 2011, 06:40:29 AM »

Personally, I try to insulate my hives w/ what nature provides.  Piled Hay/straw, followed by snow cover.  Although I do use 2" rigid insulation inside my vent/feed boxes for winter.

thomas
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"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Finski
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« Reply #51 on: August 29, 2011, 08:47:59 AM »

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Moist hay, straw = mold. 

natural = wool shirt to the hive.
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T Beek
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« Reply #52 on: August 29, 2011, 08:58:53 AM »

Different strokes for......... Wink.  I'm not giving up my wool shirts grin  My bees and I Don't have any problems w/ mold.

thomas
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"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
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