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Author Topic: rookie ?'s on hive construction, and brood/food box  (Read 717 times)
11nick
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« on: August 01, 2011, 10:17:49 PM »

Two unrelated questions:
1. From looking online and reading posts on here, many boxes are made from soft woods.  I understand the benefit of light weight.  Outside of that, there are obviously better woods for longevity.  Is there a reason why you wouldn't use pressure treated plywood to construct EVERYTHING?  Would the chemicals used in pressure treating be harmful to bees?
2.  If you leave one specific hive in the same location for many years, what happens with the food and brood chambers?  I understand you have to inspect your hive, but outside of that, do those same exact frames stay in the hive "forever"?  Or do you have to take them out and replace them with new frames periodically?  I'm not talking about the supers used to collect "your" honey.

Thanks
Nick
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Sundog
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« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2011, 11:34:07 PM »

Can't help you with question 2, I could surmise, but I won't.  I imagine when the comb gets old and dark you will want to recycle it.  (Okay, I did anyway.)

Regarding PT, I don't know the chemistry (I wouldn't believe it anyway), but I use it to border my landscaping and the grass won't grow next to it.  What does that tell you?

Personally, I don't even like plywood.  Hard on tools and exterior (or marine grade) is pricey.  Besides, I think the bees prefer a "rustic" motif, think "shaby chic".

Have fun!
« Last Edit: August 02, 2011, 12:18:34 PM by Sundog » Logged
David McLeod
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« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2011, 11:48:23 PM »

Pressure treat is unacceptable for bee use not just for the chemicals, which are more objectionable for proximity to food (honey) than it is for the bees, but because pressure treated wood is not stable. Take a look at most any deck made out of the stuff. Shrinkage, warpage and movement all over the place. Combine that with plywood and you have delamination to boot. Not suitable for apiary use.
Regular plywood grades are far more stable and if weatherproofed can give good service, though with the risk of delamination nowhere near as good with solid stock.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2011, 12:26:33 AM »

>Would the chemicals used in pressure treating be harmful to bees?

YES!!! It's an insecticide.  If you want to treat the wood (which I would not) use Curprinol instead.
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Michael Bush
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David McLeod
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« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2011, 12:35:59 AM »

Part two of your question regarding frames is that the framer need to be rotated out for replacement. You could just leave them in but for sanitation they need to be rotated out.
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Georgia Wildlife Services,Inc
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Atlanta (678) 572-8269 Macon (478) 227-4497
www.atlantawildliferemoval.net
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