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11nick
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Location: Pennsylvania


« on: July 31, 2011, 10:35:11 PM »

Hi all.
I am meerly a guy interested in beekeeping.  Too late to get into it this year, though.  I'm going to visit a local BK next week just to get an education.
I've been watching the youtube videos and reading this forum.
I did a search for this question, but didn't find exactly what I was looking for....
I understand some people move their hives around through the year, essentially chasing the pollen production in different areas.  If you just set your hives up on a large working farm, would there be enough pollen to keep the bees in business?
I'm showing my lack of knowledge, but it surprised me to learn that people moved their hives around.

I hope I'm not asking a dumb question.
Thanks for your time
Nick
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David McLeod
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« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2011, 10:58:07 PM »

Yes there is more then enough forage in temperate climates to support a colony of honey bees. Moving bees in a modern phenomena. You just do not want to overstock colonies if the forage can't support it.
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CapnChkn
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« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2011, 12:46:04 AM »

Well, actually the Egyptians put hives on barges and went up and down the Nile following the flows, but I have to agree with David here, the spirit of the question; moving bees is a modern phenomenon.

Bees in nature don't move their hives around.  They did fine for 125 million years.
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"Thinking is like sin, them that doesn't is scairt of it, and them that does gets to liking it so much they can't quit!"  -Josh Billings.
BlueBee
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« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2011, 01:12:57 AM »

Nick, some beeks are ‘chasing the pollen production’ because that’s what they do for a living; provide pollination services to various agriculture operations.  Almonds in CA, blue berries in Maine, and whatever else pays in between.

A hobbyist does not need to move a hive around to get pollen.  There is usually plenty of pollen around for the bees.  Bees will forage for miles for nectar and pollen, so there is no need to move them about.

Yes, there will be enough pollen to put multiple bee hives on your farm!

Actually it’s not too late to get started.  You can buy nucs this time of the year in PA.  Guys on here offer them.  It would be more of a challenge to get them thru a winter at this point, but having real bees enhances the learning experience.  If I were going to start at this point though, I would only go with 1 nuc and realize you may lose it over winter.   If you can live with a loss, it’s an option, otherwise wait until spring. 
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mikecva
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« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2011, 09:30:14 AM »

11nick  Welcome to the forum.   cheer

You did not say if you had taken any classes or had any equipment. Several clubs have a mentor program. A mentor is a good way to go (IMHO) because you can get advice and hands on experience that will greatly help you learn and increase your comfort level.  -Mike
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indypartridge
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« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2011, 11:51:34 AM »

Several clubs have a mentor program. A mentor is a good way to go (IMHO) because you can get advice and hands on experience that will greatly help you learn and increase your comfort level.  -Mike


Like Mike, I always recommend getting involved with a local club. They are great places to find mentors and get connected with nearby beekeepers.
http://www.pastatebeekeepers.org/map.htm
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11nick
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« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2011, 06:40:53 PM »

I looked up the link that you provided, and followed another link to local clubs.  The closest club I have is an hour or more away.  I have a long-time bee keeper that is closer to me than that who is willing to work with me. 
I don't have anything right now but a book and a desire to learn.  I may only learn that this is an interesting hobby and leave it at that.  I am not willing to start a hive of my own this late in the summer just to let them die.  I don't think that is proper.  So, I guess at this point I am going to (hopefully) make several visits with the local bee person and see how my interest develops over the winter.  If all goes well and my interest continues to grow (even more than what it already is), then I will get my own equipment in the early spring.
I read today that if I want to get a good start in the spring with bought bees and queen, I need to get an order in early.  So, I will try to make up my mind in Dec or thereabouts and get an order in at that time.
In the mean time, I am going to read this book, look around at websites, and watch this forum.

Over the course of time, I joined a number of message boards for various topics.  I always hate to ask a rookie question that has been asked a thousand times without at least making the attempt of a search.  If I ever ask something that is a worn out question, I apologize.  I try to never do that, but searches don't always turn out very productive.

Thanks everybody.
Take care
Nick
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AllenF
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« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2011, 07:03:24 PM »

I always hate to ask a rookie question that has been asked a thousand times without at least making the attempt of a search.  If I ever ask something that is a worn out question, I apologize. 

Those questions are the easiest to answer.    grin   No bad questions here.
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buzzbee
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« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2011, 07:34:08 PM »

We've all been fist timers. Ask away!!
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