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Author Topic: Cut comb prices  (Read 1400 times)
Stone
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Location: Delaware County, New York


« on: July 22, 2011, 02:48:50 PM »

Anyone knows the actual wholesale price for cut comb?  Bee Culture gives the retail price for my zone #2  as $5.73/lb.  Seems kind of low.  I run treatment free hives so I'd imagine I could ask for a little more.  I'd like to hear what you've seen around so far.  Thanks.
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sc-bee
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« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2011, 07:55:41 PM »

It's a niche market. Prices are usually set by demand! Just like jar honey mine is $6-$7 a pint I talked to a guy down the raod 30 miles the other day he wholesales his pint for $7.75 and they resale for $9.50
Gotta chek the market and demand in your area.
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kathyp
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« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2011, 08:43:34 PM »

last i saw at our farmers market was 12 dollars for 14 oz.  seemed pretty steep to me but it was selling
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Stone
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« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2011, 09:58:13 PM »

I was thinking of pricing mine at $8.50/lb, wholesale to the local general store.  Big business with second homeowners.  I'd probably sell mine at the same - $12/lb - out of my bee yard.

I've actually never seen ANY comb honey for sale around here - even at the outdoor fairs.
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sc-bee
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« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2011, 10:49:36 PM »

Most folks I know don't bother with it. I rarely have a request for it --- it possibly could become a lost art!
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AllenF
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« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2011, 06:07:37 PM »

I know for me it is a hard sell.   People here have just lost the knowledge of how to eat it.  If I tear up some frames (it happens) when extracting, I will throw them to the side to be cut into jars with the honey as we extract.   I get a buck more a jar with comb.   But people just like to look at it, not eat it for some reason.  I made bee-o-pac comb honey a couple years back.   Still have 3 left that never sold.   I use them to show people honey comb. 
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kathyp
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2011, 06:34:52 PM »

one advantage of living in tree hugger country.  people here love raw honey and comb.  it's good for them, don't you know?
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
D Coates
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« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2011, 12:06:04 PM »

I sell mine for $10 for 12 oz.  Normally the quantity is more like 14 oz but my label indicates "12 oz or more."  I sold out my first year and blew it last year and got none.  Customers were asking for it all year long.  I dedicated 3 supers to it this year.  One super collapsed from the heat when I stored it above the inner cover.  I fed it back to them and I'll never make that mistake again.  I used another super to make comb and chunk honey.  I got over 30 4x4 combs and 20 plus chunk honey containers ($12 oz. for $7).  I've still got the last comb super on the hive to see how sales go before committing it to more comb or chunk honey.  For retailers I give a 30% discount and they sometimes bump it a little.  Like raising your own queens, Comb honey is not that hard to do, unless you time it wrong.   tongue  It puts you in a non-commodity category pricing wise and gets you into doors you would otherwise have trouble getting into.
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Stone
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« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2011, 12:54:18 PM »

Thanks for this information.  Since I do foundationless, each chunk I cut is the same size but a different weight.  What you you charge as wholesale price AND retail price? There is a  small mom and pop old fashioned market in town that is very interested in cut comb and I have no idea how to price it.  Thanks.
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D Coates
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« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2011, 10:05:40 AM »

Stone,

I buy the 4x4 clear plastic containers from Dadant or Better Bee for $1 apiece.  Sometimes, what you cut will be too thick to fit in it or too thin to hit the 12 oz minimum I claim.  What I do is cut out a pattern (from cardboard) that fits in the box as well as have another pattern cut to show minimum depth.  Cut those pieces that are too deep into chunk honey pieces or give them to your neighbors as "thank yous" for well... it's just good to keep your neighbors on good terms when you have bees.  I started out charging $7 for cut comb (5 years ago) and now charge $10.  I offer a 30% discount to retailers for comb (up to 40% for honey for bulk buys).  You'll find you have little competition and you can always lower your price if so inclined.
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Ninja, is not in the dictionary.  Well played Ninja's, well played...
Stone
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Location: Delaware County, New York


« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2011, 11:19:37 AM »

$10/lb retail is pretty good.  I was thinking of charging $7.75/lb wholesale and about $11 or $12/lb wholesale.  I'll have to see how it plays around here. 

I thought of taking some less than attractive pieces of comb and offering it at half price retail for samples in the store - to get things rolling and to create a demand.  I laminated a FAQ sheet for customers in the store for good PR as a selling point. Advertising never hurts.

Regarding containers: I purchased a case of clear containers from Restaurant Depot with snap on lids - 4 1/2 inches by 5 1/2 inches and 2 inches high. The kind you see in delis and salad bar places. Plenty deep enough for the thickest comb but not overlarge. Case of 252 for $32.  Pretty good price in my view.  Said "Dart Clearpac" on the carton - 24 oz.
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