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Author Topic: how do I extract honey without mechanical extractor?  (Read 8069 times)
Algonam
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« on: July 25, 2011, 08:16:09 PM »

I may be just extracting enough honey for personal use this year and need to know how to do this and still leave the drawn comb in tact... similar to how it is left after the honey has been extracted mechanically.

Do any of you have a method?

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AllenF
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« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2011, 08:32:24 PM »

Turn the frame on it's side after uncapping and let it drip out for a long long time.   
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sc-bee
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« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2011, 08:39:10 PM »

Turn the frame on it's side after uncapping and let it drip out for a long long time.   

Don't think you will have much luck with that. A little will drip but it is held in the cells by cohesion and will need spinning.
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« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2011, 09:24:30 PM »

 the frame need to be heated so most of the honey can get out of the cell.you won't get it all out but enough for yourself.the thicker the honey the less will come out.       .......schawee
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« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2011, 09:54:27 PM »

Well, you could slide a frame into a piece of panty hose. Push the frame all the way down into the toe and pull the hose tight to support the comb. Now spin that sucker round and round over your head while someone else catches what slings out.
That is the principle of extraction and if can accomplish it without mechanicals you could retire a millionaire.
The only other option that comes to mind is a pipette. That's the little straw thingy lab techs use to draw up liquids for sampling, very small samples. With twenty or so thousand cells per super you might have one empty by the time the bees need again.
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salvo
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« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2011, 10:11:05 PM »


1. Remove frames from hive (frames with honey, not brood).

2. Shake all bees from frame (important: "all bees").

3. Bring frames (with honey,...and no bees) into your house, into your bathroom and place those frames in bottom of your bathtub.

3. Wash and rinse your feet thoroughly in preparation for stomping. Immediately step into the tub and crush the comb with your feet. Continue stomping until comb is completely pulverized.

4. Transfer the contents of the tub to a... that's as far as I got.

I'm a newbee. I haven't done this yet. But I think it could work???

Salvo



Read more: How to Stomp Grapes & Make Wine | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_6311746_stomp-grapes-make-wine.html#ixzz1TAmbGg8u
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Salvo
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« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2011, 11:06:54 PM »

Ha ha ha!  Somebody's going to have a huge mess!!!!

Just scrape the comb off of the frame into a dishpan or clean bucket.  Buy a couple of 5 gallon paint strainers from the hardware store and wash well.

Squish up the comb really well, scoop it all into the paint strainer and let it drain into the bucket.

I've worked out a little better system -  using free buckets with lids from the local bakery.  Cut the middle out of one of the lids, put that on a bucket.  Drill lots of half inch holes in the bottom of another bucket and set that ontop of the cutout lid.  Then cut out yet another lid and set that ontop of all that.  The paint strainer goes into the bucket with holes in the bottom, the cut lid goes on top of that to hold the strainer.  The comb and honey goes in there, strains through the paint strainer, through the holes in the bottom of the bucket down into the bucket below that.  It does take a while, and heat will speed it up, but I don't recommend putting it in the garage incase the bees get in.
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indypartridge
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« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2011, 07:04:17 AM »

Your options are basically "crush and strain" as Scadsobees noted, build an extractor (google for plans), or borrow one. 

I borrowed extractors for years before I eventually bought one. Sometimes clubs have one they'll loan out. Some beekeepers will loan you one as long as you return it clean, others may want some kind of payment (cash, honey, labor).
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L Daxon
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« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2011, 10:09:47 AM »

Getting honey out of drawn comb while leaving the comb in tack is very difficult without an extractor.  As others have said, you can uncap the frame, turn it on its side over some kind of collection pan, maybe heat it a bit with a hair dryer turned on low to make the honey a bit more runny, and hope some of the honey drips out, but you won't get it all. After you have gotten all you think you can, put the frame back in or near the hive for the bees to clean up.

That is a lot of trouble. As a hobbyist beek, I have always just "crushed and strained" the whole frame and had the girls build new foundation for the next go round.  Crush and strain has the advantage of 1)  getting the option to make cut comb honey, 2)  ending up with a lot of extra wax you can make candles or do other things with, 3) it is actually a faster way to process than using an extractor and 4) it is much cheaper than buying an extractor, cleaning it, and finding a place to store it the other 360+ days a year you aren't using it.

Fortunately my local bee club just bought an extractor for us to share this year so I am going to get a chance to extract (with a motorized extractor no less) for the first time in 10 years.   pink elephant
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linda d
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« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2011, 10:43:00 AM »

Here is a take off the metal one on U-tube
this one should cost less the $10.00 if you
have a barrel its 1 3/4 pipe and 8 to 10 nuts
threaded rod.
 I used a Drill
It will flat out sling honey  Smiley
I found its best to sling with the drill in reverse
it keeps the nuts from unscrewing




http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i319/tommytt1/DSCF6763.jpg
http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i319/tommytt1/DSCF6759.jpg
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2011, 10:56:09 AM »

I tried many times to uncap and let it run out.  It doesn't run out, at least not in my climate with my honey.  Not enough to matter at all.  Crush and strain works well.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesharvest.htm
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Robee
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« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2011, 02:33:01 PM »

I saw this little video on you tube and I honestly see no reason why it wouldn't work.  You could do just one frame if you like.
The name of the video is "simple honey extractor"  so just do a search on you tube and watch.
Robee
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Sundog
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« Reply #12 on: July 26, 2011, 03:06:16 PM »

Simple but elegant.  I like it!  I have some thoughts, before I build a variation of my own.

First, grind a hex on the end of your shaft (boy does that have connotations...), that way your nuts won't come loose (can't stop laughing) .  Then you could also go bi-directional and not need to flip your frames.  (Glad that's over.)

Also, does anybody know of a reason why oak could not be used to suspend the frames rather than the pipe?  Oak is used to 'flavor age" some of my favorite beverages.  Wine, Jack Daniels and Vernor's Ginger Ale come to mind.  I wouldn't leave the honey in the (not wooden) tub so I woudn't think that it would pick up any flavor from the wood.

Now to find a tub.

Regards
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Tommyt
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« Reply #13 on: July 26, 2011, 07:07:38 PM »

Sundog
 While your grinding your rod of course your wood can be used shocked
I used a piece of Mahogany screwed to the bottom of the barrel
with a hole bored dead center that where the acorn nut goes
I even packed some bees wax in the hole


Tommyt
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sc-bee
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« Reply #14 on: July 26, 2011, 09:22:16 PM »

With some fitting could a four framer be built?
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Robee
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« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2011, 09:36:56 PM »

The "simple honey extractor"  isn't a mechanical extractor at all.  You are the mechanics.  The guy takes a large clear container, puts a grate in, such as you would cool pies or cookies on, lays the frame in there, and puts the cover on.  He ties it up and spins it.  Very simple and you probably have everything you would need already.  I am tempted on trying this with comb from one of my top bar hives or my foundationless Langs. I tried to post a link but after 4 years or so being a member, I haven't posted enough to be allowed to post links, I guess.
Robee
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CapnChkn
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« Reply #16 on: July 26, 2011, 11:21:56 PM »

HeHee!

Not with my shoulder!  This could give the neighbors a show.

Simple Honey Extractor
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Algonam
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« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2011, 05:51:15 AM »

At first I laughed at it, but then thought this might just work....for now anyway.
I'd be interested to see if the comb or foundation gets damaged in any way.

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Tommyt
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« Reply #18 on: July 27, 2011, 08:21:53 AM »

.  I am tempted on trying this with comb from one of my top bar hives or my foundationless Langs. I tried to post a link but after 4 years or so being a member, I haven't posted enough to be allowed to post links, I guess.
Robee
Robee
 If you want to try a top bar how about one of those Bar-be-Q fish baskets the ones that close like a suitcase
You may want to add some 1/8 inch hard ware cloth to it
I would then rig a way to put the handle to a drill

Tommyt
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Intheswamp
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« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2011, 09:57:27 AM »

Here is a take off the metal one on U-tube
this one should cost less the $10.00 if you
have a barrel its 1 3/4 pipe and 8 to 10 nuts
threaded rod.
 I used a Drill
It will flat out sling honey  Smiley
I found its best to sling with the drill in reverse
it keeps the nuts from unscrewing

<Images snipped>
Tommyt, that's a nice design...I'm gonna remember this one!  I've got a few questions...   grin

It looks like you're using 1/4" all-thread...right? 

What about at the top?...looks like a white piece of pvc pipe extending upward from the all-thread...Huh

How are you attaching the drill...stacking nuts and using a socket on the drill?

Have you had any problems with the frames spinning on the all-thread shaft?  Using lock washers between the nuts and pipe?

A couple of thoughts...  What about cutting slots in the bottom end pieces to allow any honey might collect in the bottom to drain out?  Some slots could also be cut in the pvc cross pieces to allow the ears of the honey frames to slip into, that would secure the frames even more (if needed).  Stacking another set of cross pieces on top of the first ones could double the production but some way of solidly connecting the two sets of cross pieces would be required...some pvc "cross" fittings would probably work (I've seen them available for building hoop greenhouses).

Again, nice design!!!!  MUCH food for thought!!!  I can even envision setting up a small motor and router control to it.  Thanks for posting it!!!!

Ed

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« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2011, 10:00:09 PM »

buy a cheap hand crank extractor and just get it over with.  if not crush and strain like mike said.  just takes longer to build back up.  I do like the pvc rig.  that might work in a small trash can or something.  good idea if you have a drill
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« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2011, 11:25:14 PM »

Sundog
 While your grinding your rod of course your wood can be used shocked
I used a piece of Mahogany screwed to the bottom of the barrel
with a hole bored dead center that where the acorn nut goes
I even packed some bees wax in the hole


Tommyt

I'm sketching up plans for oak bars and food grade bearings. It will do four medium frames, and since I will have both, I want to make it suitable for top bars too.  My biggest dilema is the container.

Tommy, did you get my PM regarding queens?
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Bee-Bop
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« Reply #22 on: July 28, 2011, 12:34:38 PM »

[
 What about cutting slots in the bottom end pieces to allow any honey might collect in the bottom to drain out?  
Ed

[/quote]

Not needed, it's a radial design !

Bee-Bop
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« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2011, 12:42:05 PM »

Quote from: Sundog   Then you could also go bi-directional and not need to flip your frames.  

[/quote

This is a radial design extractor. No need to flip frames !!

Bee=Bop
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« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2011, 01:20:58 PM »

Quote
Then you could also go bi-directional and not need to flip your frames.

Quote
This is a radial design extractor. No need to flip frames !!

Bee=Bop

Agreed.  I was wonderng about the wind reistance (air pressure) on the leading side retaining some of the honey.
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Bee-Bop
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« Reply #25 on: July 28, 2011, 02:04:05 PM »



Agreed.  I was wonderng about the wind reistance (air pressure) on the leading side retaining some of the honey.
[/quote]

Nope, this is the way radials, have worked for years, clean slick as a whistle!

Centrifugal force !!

Bee-Bop
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« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2011, 02:40:28 PM »

When I get water in my ear, why doesn’t the doctor grab me by my feet and spin me around?
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Bee-Bop
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« Reply #27 on: July 28, 2011, 03:20:45 PM »

When I get water in my ear, why doesn’t the doctor grab me by my feet and spin me around?

Maybe he's afraid you will loose some more brain cells, along with the water ??

Bee-Bop
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