Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 24, 2014, 08:17:57 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How many frames of brood should I expect now?  (Read 932 times)
ksw9298
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7

Location: Central Wisconsin


« on: July 20, 2011, 02:24:16 PM »

This is my first year with bees, so thank you for the wealth of info on this forum.  I wish I would have found this before buying my beginner beekeeping kit this spring.

My question is how many frames of brood should I expect now?  I've got 2 deeps - 10 frames each (with foundation) and just added a small super about 2 weeks ago.   When I inspected the hive today, I found several frames in the bottom deep with pollen, honey, and what appeared to be empty cells.  Only a few had brood, and only a small section of the frame was covered.  But I didn't see any eggs.   In the second deep, there was 3 frames of full brood, another with eggs and brood, but the rest were honey, nectar and pollen.  The super (foundationless) has 4 frames of straight comb with some nectar or water I believe.  I did see supersedure cells in the 2nd deep.  I've only found my queen once this year, but have always found eggs when I've done my inspections.

As a new beek, I can now see why settling on one size makes so much sense.  I had problems getting the bees to move up to the super, so I moved a deep frame to the small super for a starting point.  (As I had found in a post here).  That worked like a charm, but I did end up breaking the comb that got built up underneath.  I was hoping to rubber band it into the super, but I'm still learning to juggle a hive tool, 1 full frame, and 1 empty frame.  I'm reading Brian's post about being pollen bound, but I don't know if I've reached that point yet.  Plus I don't have any extra frames/boxes laying around like it appears I need to have. 

Thanks for any help.
Logged
mikecva
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 583


Location: Northern Virginia USA


« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2011, 02:58:28 PM »

Although it is only July 20, my girls are bracing for winter in Virginia. I still have eggs coming but not at the rate I did in April/May. I use three mediums for the hive and medium supers. The bees are back filling frames 1 and 10 in all three boxes, I hope this does not mean a very hard winter as they did this a few years ago and we had more snow then usual. When finished, I will be on 2:1 feedings so the bees will be able to keep their honey. P&N flow is present but low here at this time with a late flow expected.  -Mike
Logged

.
.
Listen to others but make your own decisions. That way you own the results.
.
.
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15027


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2011, 03:32:04 PM »

if you have some empty drawn frames, put them on either side of the current brood.  you can pull them from the other box and replace with the honey/pollen frames, but don't put full frames immediately below or above the brood. leave empty/drawn frames through the middle so that if she wants to move, she can.
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
bee-nuts
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1101


Location: Northwest Wisconsin


WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2011, 04:12:37 AM »

Hi, neighbor!

What did you start with and when (3lb package, five frame nuc)? 

It all depends on what you started with, whether you had foundation, drawn comb, if you feed and how long, if you have had a good flow, ect.  It does not sound like you are doing real bad but does not sound like your are doing fantastic either.  If your queen is being superseded, your queen may not have been all it could be too.  Its hard to tell.

A friend of mine started with two 3lb packages this year the 3rd of May and two 5 frame nucleus colonies from me on the 17th of May.  He started with all foundation, feed syrup till they had drawn out most of the two deeps with comb and then stopped before he added honey supers.  I know once he did that then he had a hard time getting them to start working the medium foundation.  Last week or so ago it sounded like they had about half the medium frames capped in two and others were just starting to draw them.  He says all four have the deeps packed full of honey, pollen, and brood.  He says the five frame nucs were a few steps ahead of the packages a couple weeks after he got them cause once the brood started hatching they had more bees.

I hope that helps.  Keep in mind every location is different.  If you have all drawn comb that makes a huge difference because they can raise as much brood as they can feed and keep warm.  Next season if these died on you, you would see a major difference when starting with comb over foundation.
Logged

The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson
ksw9298
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7

Location: Central Wisconsin


« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2011, 08:47:22 AM »

Thanks for the replies. 

I started with a 3 lb package on May 10.  All brand new plastic foundation in the 2 deeps.  It took awhile for them to start with that, and I'm not too happy with the fit in the bottom deep.  The small super is foundationless. 

I agree, I don't think mine are doing as well as your friends, but I'm hoping they have enough for winter. 

bee-nuts:  do you do anything special in preparing for winter in WI?  Wrapping hives, hay bales, etc...

Logged
bee-nuts
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1101


Location: Northwest Wisconsin


WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2011, 01:11:10 PM »

"bee-nuts:  do you do anything special in preparing for winter in WI?  Wrapping hives, hay bales, etc..."

Yes I do.  I insulate, wrap, and provide winter emergency reserves.  However, its a work in progress so I dont want to recommend my wintering ways.  When the time comes i will offer advice on things if you ask.  Wintering up here in the north may be one of the longest and hardest things to master if you want to really provide the best environmental conditions possible for them and have the intelligence to understand what goes on.  You cant poke around in the hive during the winter so you just have to wait and see come spring, then make adjustments accordingly.  You will read many conflicting theory stated as fact.  I enjoy reading old books from the mid 1800's to today.
Logged

The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4121

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2011, 01:22:14 PM »

The old books will tell you North of Columbus, OH winter in your basement   Smiley
Logged
nella
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 189

Location: Allentown, Pa.


« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2011, 02:04:34 PM »

Fifty Years Among the Bees
Dr. C. C. Miller (Author)

If you like to read old books this makes for some enjoyable reading.
Logged
ksw9298
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7

Location: Central Wisconsin


« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2011, 02:44:24 PM »

<   You cant poke around in the hive during the winter so you just have to wait and see come spring, then make adjustments accordingly.  You will read many conflicting theory stated as fact.  >

Poking around in the hive is what I'm finding most enjoyable.  Probably a big reason why my hive may be behind others.  But I'm learning.  I'm already plotting on hives 2 and 3 for next year.  As for the conflicting theories, I'm glad they don't have a smiley face icon that kills, otherwise most of the major posters on this forum would probably be dead.  It's amazing how heated some discussions have become. 

Logged
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4121

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #9 on: July 21, 2011, 02:56:05 PM »

Just wait until winter.

That's when the fun really starts on this forum  grin
Logged
bee-nuts
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1101


Location: Northwest Wisconsin


WWW
« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2011, 08:39:28 PM »

"It's amazing how heated some discussions have become."

Just your everyday beekeeping politics.  Soon you will be in on all the opinionated fun, lol.

You and me both need and observation hive to watch indoors in the winter.  Im moving back to a somewhat country setting on 6 acres with good old mind your own business neighbors so I will be able to keep some bees at home for once.  I hope I find the time to make a observation hive to put next to computer desk so i can spent quality time with the bees when I get home from work and read and post on the forum.  Maybe ten obh's would be better, lol.
Logged

The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.161 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 17, 2014, 07:55:06 PM
anything