Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 26, 2014, 03:17:48 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Ukraine Beeks  (Read 7155 times)
smartline555
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1

Location: Cherkassy Ukraine


« on: July 09, 2011, 12:47:23 PM »

Hi - I'm a born again beek after 20years dormant, I live in Ukraine, born in Australia ninth generation, family immigrated from England to Australia in the 1860's from Somerset in England. Family history shows they grew cider apples and kept bees to produce honey for mead making. I'm interested in making contact with other beeks in Ukraine who can talk a little English because my Russian is not all that good. Ukraine beekeeping industry employs over half million Ukrainians, both professional beekeepers and hobbyists and the average annual honey output near 75,000 metric tons. Therefore, Ukraine is the fifth-ranked country in the world in terms of the honey production output after China, India, Argentina, and the USA. Traveling around Ukraine you quickly learn Ukraine people are passionate about two things their vodka and their honey. Beekeeping in Ukraine is different in many ways, husbandry, bee breeds and honey styles are unique to this part of the world. However, the Ukraine people are still mostly information hoarders and gate keepers a legacy from their long soviet past. So thanks for the site and I hope to make contact with others interested in sharing their beek experience and knowledge.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2013, 08:00:54 AM by Robo » Logged
asprince
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1693

Location: Fort Valley, Georgia


« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2011, 08:31:18 PM »

Welcome. We would love to see pictures.

Good Luck,

Steve
Logged

Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resembalance to the first. - Ronald Reagan
pr1zZ
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3

Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2013, 05:32:19 AM »

hello, iam too from Ukr (Kiev). Ukr have most of bees in European. If u have some questions for our beekeeping, ask here. Sorry for my eng.
My father whis my uncle have 300 family of bees.








« Last Edit: February 07, 2013, 08:01:08 AM by Robo » Logged
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8104

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2013, 07:28:15 AM »

The system blocks  it due to spammers.   You can get a mod to post your pics until you get your post count up where you can post your pics yourself.  (keeps the spam down here)

But I would like to see pics of beekeeping over there.   
Logged
tefer2
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2135

Location: Kalamazoo,MI


« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2013, 08:06:12 AM »

Welcome to the forum smartllne.
Logged
o.molchanov
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 23

Location: Ukraine, Kharkiv


WWW
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2013, 07:13:22 AM »

Hi,

Welcome. Please let me know do you use in your practice Ukrainian hives? These are big loungers with non-standard frame. I'm really interesting in trying to use the mentioned hives at my apiary.
Logged

beeman77
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1

Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2013, 07:17:38 AM »

What kind of bee food or syrup are you giving to the bees for the winter period?

regards

Thomas

Logged
Kyle
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7

Location: Forsyth County, NC


« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2013, 07:56:58 PM »

I am no longer in Ukraine myself (lived there for 32 months--mostly in Zaporozhye in early 2000s).  I loved living in Ukraine--my friends, the food, strangers on the trains and in the street, the nice warm summers and nice cold winters.  I did not start keeping bees until several years after I left Ukraine, but I do remember visiting a museum (near Kyiv I think) where they had a small selection of old beehives made of sections of hollow tree trunks.  They really made an impression on me.  I also remember that I had my first taste of creamed honey in Ukraine.  As a matter of fact, most honey I ate in Ukraine was different creamed honeys.  I am kind of sad today that I was not into beekeeping while I was in Ukraine, I would have searched out a beekeeper to help out while learning the Ukrainian ways of keeping bees.  I have found some really interesting videos on Youtube of mostly Russian beekeepers explaining some of the things they do in the apiary and how to harvest things like bee bread (ambrosia).  In these videos, I see some really cool hives that are larger than what we use in the USA (maybe they have 11 or 12 frames instead of our 10 frames).  These hives have a different hive base than what we use as well as having a sort of lip or something on the top edge of each box so that it fits into the bottom of the box (or lid) you put on top.  They also use a sort of pillow above the top of the frames to absorb moisture (I think).  I have not been able to find plans for this type of hive, so I don't really know where to begin to try to make one (I am not a woodworker so I can't just figure it out by looking at what they show on the videos so I would need a set of drawings to work from).  Anyhow, if I had been into beekeeping when I lived in Ukraine, then maybe I would have learned directly how to make this type of hive from a master beekeeper who used that kind of hive.  Anyhow, maybe the next time I work in Ukraine  Smiley.  I actually don't do the same work as I did back then, so I don't know that I would have the opportunity to move back to Ukraine now-a-days.  I doubt that they need an American transit planner--they do transit in Ukraine 100 times better than we do it in the USA.  Maybe a beekeeper exchange program?  That would be cool!  Spend a year in a different country to learn from the different ways they work with bees and harvest hive products!  Anyhow, I am excited to see this post on Ukrainian beekeeping, and I look forward to learning more about Ukrainian techniques in beekeeping.

Thanks,
Кайл
Logged
Kruk
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2

Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2014, 01:53:06 PM »

I am no longer in Ukraine myself (lived there for 32 months--mostly in Zaporozhye in early 2000s).  I loved living in Ukraine--my friends, the food, strangers on the trains and in the street, the nice warm summers and nice cold winters.  I did not start keeping bees until several years after I left Ukraine, but I do remember visiting a museum (near Kyiv I think) where they had a small selection of old beehives made of sections of hollow tree trunks.  They really made an impression on me.  I also remember that I had my first taste of creamed honey in Ukraine.  As a matter of fact, most honey I ate in Ukraine was different creamed honeys.  I am kind of sad today that I was not into beekeeping while I was in Ukraine, I would have searched out a beekeeper to help out while learning the Ukrainian ways of keeping bees.  I have found some really interesting videos on Youtube of mostly Russian beekeepers explaining some of the things they do in the apiary and how to harvest things like bee bread (ambrosia).  In these videos, I see some really cool hives that are larger than what we use in the USA (maybe they have 11 or 12 frames instead of our 10 frames).  These hives have a different hive base than what we use as well as having a sort of lip or something on the top edge of each box so that it fits into the bottom of the box (or lid) you put on top.  They also use a sort of pillow above the top of the frames to absorb moisture (I think).  I have not been able to find plans for this type of hive, so I don't really know where to begin to try to make one (I am not a woodworker so I can't just figure it out by looking at what they show on the videos so I would need a set of drawings to work from).  Anyhow, if I had been into beekeeping when I lived in Ukraine, then maybe I would have learned directly how to make this type of hive from a master beekeeper who used that kind of hive.  Anyhow, maybe the next time I work in Ukraine  Smiley.  I actually don't do the same work as I did back then, so I don't know that I would have the opportunity to move back to Ukraine now-a-days.  I doubt that they need an American transit planner--they do transit in Ukraine 100 times better than we do it in the USA.  Maybe a beekeeper exchange program?  That would be cool!  Spend a year in a different country to learn from the different ways they work with bees and harvest hive products!  Anyhow, I am excited to see this post on Ukrainian beekeeping, and I look forward to learning more about Ukrainian techniques in beekeeping.

Thanks,
Кайл
Logged
Kruk
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2

Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2014, 02:03:00 PM »

I am no longer in Ukraine myself (lived there for 32 months--mostly in Zaporozhye in early 2000s).  I loved living in Ukraine--my friends, the food, strangers on the trains and in the street, the nice warm summers and nice cold winters.  I did not start keeping bees until several years after I left Ukraine, but I do remember visiting a museum (near Kyiv I think) where they had a small selection of old beehives made of sections of hollow tree trunks.  They really made an impression on me.  I also remember that I had my first taste of creamed honey in Ukraine.  As a matter of fact, most honey I ate in Ukraine was different creamed honeys.  I am kind of sad today that I was not into beekeeping while I was in Ukraine, I would have searched out a beekeeper to help out while learning the Ukrainian ways of keeping bees.  I have found some really interesting videos on Youtube of mostly Russian beekeepers explaining some of the things they do in the apiary and how to harvest things like bee bread (ambrosia).  In these videos, I see some really cool hives that are larger than what we use in the USA (maybe they have 11 or 12 frames instead of our 10 frames).  These hives have a different hive base than what we use as well as having a sort of lip or something on the top edge of each box so that it fits into the bottom of the box (or lid) you put on top.  They also use a sort of pillow above the top of the frames to absorb moisture (I think).  I have not been able to find plans for this type of hive, so I don't really know where to begin to try to make one (I am not a woodworker so I can't just figure it out by looking at what they show on the videos so I would need a set of drawings to work from).  Anyhow, if I had been into beekeeping when I lived in Ukraine, then maybe I would have learned directly how to make this type of hive from a master beekeeper who used that kind of hive.  Anyhow, maybe the next time I work in Ukraine  Smiley.  I actually don't do the same work as I did back then, so I don't know that I would have the opportunity to move back to Ukraine now-a-days.  I doubt that they need an American transit planner--they do transit in Ukraine 100 times better than we do it in the USA.  Maybe a beekeeper exchange program?  That would be cool!  Spend a year in a different country to learn from the different ways they work with bees and harvest hive products!  Anyhow, I am excited to see this post on Ukrainian beekeeping, and I look forward to learning more about Ukrainian techniques in beekeeping.

Thanks,
Кайл
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.791 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page July 24, 2014, 07:00:22 AM
anything