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Author Topic: Another Swarm and frustration...  (Read 2358 times)
Irina
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Location: New Boston, NH


« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2011, 03:33:55 PM »

Today, it their 5th day on the tree. Some bees from this swarm are getting in and out the bait box.
They are even working on the old frames I placed in the bait with lemongrass oil. Still hopping they will get inside the bait box. Just want them to move somewhere...
I will try to use all your advices. Thank you again!
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Irina, NB

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Haddon
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« Reply #21 on: June 28, 2011, 11:44:57 AM »

Don't think I saw this one but if you are in the county you could use a 22 and shoot the limb off the tree. Sounds hard but it really isn't as a kid I would practice shooting limbs and saplings down for the fun of it.   
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jaseemtp
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« Reply #22 on: June 28, 2011, 11:53:08 AM »

Haddon, I have heard of folks trying that before and all the swarm did was move to another limb.
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"It's better to die upon your feet than to live upon your knees!" Zapata
Scadsobees
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« Reply #23 on: June 28, 2011, 12:37:22 PM »

Yeah, that is terribly frustrating!  Most of my swarms go into my 10 foot cherry tree, but a few of them end up 60 feet up (mostly the big ones)!  I spend a long time staring at them trying to think of schemes to get them down, but they always leave.  I've tried the swarm trap for them too, and they snubbed me....
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Rick
Irina
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« Reply #24 on: June 28, 2011, 03:30:47 PM »

Finally, They left us yesterday! Even the 10-20 bees from the bait left with them.

Haddon, my husband would love your suggestion...... He would probably use all his weapons and ammunition.
It is good that we did not receive your solution before the swarm left.
Thank you all!!! You guys are great!
I am glad that I found this forum.
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Irina, NB

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Haddon
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« Reply #25 on: June 28, 2011, 03:51:37 PM »

You might want to invest in some make shift bait boxes about a mile from your place in all four directions. Instinct for honey bees is to move when they swarm also put bait boxes in your yard for next year you probably will not catch your hives swarms in them but you might catch the swarm off the swarm that just left you. Remember if your hive swarms off this year it doesn't move any further than it can swarm back next year. I always get swarms from wild hives here its the reason in bad years I will open feed I feel if I help keep the wild ones up and going then next year they will repay me with a swarm or two.
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Irina
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« Reply #26 on: June 28, 2011, 04:03:53 PM »

Haddon, Good to know this. As always learning!
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Irina, NB

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T Beek
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« Reply #27 on: June 28, 2011, 05:02:51 PM »

 As a few mentioned, keeping your broodnests open is the best way to suppress swarming.  It must be done early enough to be effective, before they decide to swarm Wink which means looking in 'at least' twice a month.  Someone should really write a book on KYBO (keeping your Broodnests open) because it is basic beekeeping, albeit known by many different names, which likely cause great confusion (so it goes).  It must be practiced and perfected to be effective.  Too many beeks simply add another box when bees 'seem crowded' but that never works, whether for expanding brood nest or expecting honey in return.  Bees need a bit of coaxing, not just an 'empty' box.  

Open up your colonies and locate the brood nest (bring an extra box with frames) remove some brood frames (1 or two or three or five depending on number of bees/boxes/hive type) from each box, placing them into 'new' box, each separated by an empty frame.  Place empty frames where you removed brood from, keeping just 'one' empty frame between each frame with brood.  Try to keep brood together as you stack them back up.  That's KYBO.  Hope this makes sense.

While it 'might' slow down the tendency to swarm, splitting your colonies gives you 'more' hives, not necessarily more bees, and if that is what you want then you should make splits, there is much written on the various methods.  

However, KYBO makes your existing hives stronger 'and' less prone to swarm and if done in a timely and methodical manner will outperform any other method to prevent swarming.  But............... sometimes they just swarm no matter what you do.  But don't be sad about losing one now and then, that's like being sad for having sex grin. if you're a bee.

thomas
« Last Edit: June 29, 2011, 10:37:22 AM by T Beek » Logged

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