Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
October 24, 2014, 02:53:28 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Imrie shims.  (Read 2936 times)
Geoff
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 582

Location: Yinnar, Australia


« on: June 30, 2005, 10:56:29 PM »

Have just been reading one of George Imries old pink pages & he talks of these shims which I presume are openings for workers above the brood boxes.
Can anybody describe these for me or relate to some similar equipment ?
Logged

Local Area Network in Australia - the LAN down under.
Phoenix
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 139

Location: Middle of The Great Lakes State, Milford, MI


WWW
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2005, 12:29:13 AM »

I don't have the exact specs, but it is an open frame of 3/4" x 3/4" wood stock with nothing in the middle, of course made to the length and width of your hives. I'm not sure whether or not you guys in OZ use Langstroth equipment or not.   I saw some of these shims on hives a few years ago, and I don't think they were a completely connected frame, there was about 3" missing from the middle of one side for the entrance.

Basically the shim is like the frame of an inner cover without the tempered hardboard sheet.

I'm not sure if I described that well enough.  rolleyes

I made some, but I chose to use a more rigid design, by eliminating the gap for the entrance.  I just notched a 3/8" deep by 3" wide entrance, that way the frame is more sturdy.  I don't like the amount of burr comb built in this gap between hive bodies though.  I went back to just using top entrances.
Logged

TwT
Senior Forum
Global Moderator
Galactic Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3384


Location: Walker, La.

Ted


« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2005, 12:29:35 AM »

MB,ROBO,GOLF,FINSKY or PHOENIX,   should be able to answer this question>...
Logged

THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic
Kris^
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 560


Location: Williamstown, NJ


« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2005, 07:42:29 AM »

I use pieces of wood lathe (construction shims) I bought from my local big box for a couple bucks a bundle, and cut them down to fit the perimeter of my hive boxes.  I just lay them into place above the first honey super, and the boxes above hold them in place.  Plus, the bees propolize them pretty quickly.  They're about 3/8" think, and I have had no problem with burr comb using them.  The bees use them readily for entering and leaving, once they get used to them.  You can see the shims in use below, right above the first super on each of my hives.



-- Kris
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13759


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2005, 08:08:37 AM »

Brushy Mt. has George's version.  Betterbee has their own which is a bit stronger.  They are not hard to make.  Pretend you cut a 3/4" slice off of your deep box (you should cut 3" off it anyway Smiley ) and cut a notch 3/8" high and 3/4" wide to let the air and bees out.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2005, 08:17:35 AM »

I do not understand what is that shim.

Here is something but what
http://mainebee.com/articles/geaug.php

Kris has pretty hives!

.
Logged
leominsterbeeman
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 461


Location: Leominster, MA


WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2005, 02:07:11 PM »

Betterbee has a good picture.....

They give you space above a box and provide an entrance.  



Shims are handy devices for top feeding pollen substitute or applying pesticide patties. They are placed on the top hive body and are about one inch high. The corners are box jointed for strength. They are the same size as our wooden hives, but can be used on the poly hives also. They come unassembled with screw holes drilled and with screws. There is also an upper entrance that can be closed with a plug. This can be removed for a wither entrance or for extra ventilation in the summer.
Logged

eivindm
Global Moderator
Field Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 648


Location: Oslo, Norway


WWW
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2005, 02:23:07 PM »

The frist part of this article describes the "proper use of the shims"
http://mainebee.com/articles/geaug.php
Logged
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2005, 03:02:07 PM »

Quote from: leominsterbeeman
.....

They give you space above a box and provide an entrance.  

[............r.


OK, by accicent I use that. Reason is this that I had first 9 frame boxes and then I start to use 10 frame styrofoam boxes. I have 10 mm extra frame to fit to measure together. I feed pollen patty under it at spring. I use it also on winter, because it gives space.  Tongue
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13759


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2005, 04:42:48 PM »

I like them for feeding pollen in the spring and for introducing queens.  Smiley  I don't use them much the rest of the time.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
thegolfpsycho
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 583

Location: canyon rim, ut


« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2005, 06:20:06 PM »

I don't use anything like that too often.  Most of my shims I just cut from cedar roof shingles, but almost anything will do.  I slide them in and break them off.  One bundle will last a very long time.  I offset supers, tip up the inner cover.  For introducing queens, I grab a frame and notch it so the cage will slide down and wedge above the wax but not hold the the frame above it up.  I keep my hive tool razor sharpe on the flat end for planeing wood, cutting wax, etc.  Creativity is a big part of beekeeping.  If there was a formula, what fun would that be??
Logged
Geoff
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 582

Location: Yinnar, Australia


« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2005, 06:46:40 PM »

Thanks to everyone for their thoughts on shims. It is typical of beekeepers that there is more than one way around a problem.
   As some down under would say " There is more than one way to skin a cat "
Logged

Local Area Network in Australia - the LAN down under.
Phoenix
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 139

Location: Middle of The Great Lakes State, Milford, MI


WWW
« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2005, 11:19:41 PM »

Americans have a similar saying... "Theres more than one way to skin a Kangaroo"  cheesy
Logged

Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2005, 11:49:21 PM »

I do not remember if Finnish has any that kind of sayings. They like only one truth and some day it is scanged and it will be one truth again Tongue
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.126 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page October 21, 2014, 01:11:41 AM
anything