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Author Topic: What Tree is This?  (Read 2182 times)
Lone
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« on: October 12, 2011, 03:16:35 AM »

We've only seen one of these trees out in flower in the paddock, and I'm wondering if anyone knows what it's called.

Lone




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Mardak
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2011, 06:22:06 AM »

That's easy, it is a big tree with pretty little green leaves, branches to climb on, grey/brown bark and white flowers for the bees to enjoy. It needs water and nutrients to grow. Does this help ?
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Lone
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2011, 08:03:36 AM »

Thanks, Mardak!

   pink elephant
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Geoff
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2011, 04:25:17 PM »

I'm glad Mardak stuck his head up first to get it kicked !!
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Local Area Network in Australia - the LAN down under.
Lone
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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2011, 08:31:03 PM »

Mexicans!

(You included, Bud, you're from the south)
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Danulsarn
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« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2011, 06:10:46 PM »

Hi,

It's from the genus Flindersia, many of which occur in the rainforest. It doesn't look like it's anywhere near the rainforest which may help you identify it.
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Wits End
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« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2011, 10:08:50 PM »

Looks like some kind of olive. Blooms look like sweet olive but the leaves look more like a fruiting olive. Is that possible where you are?
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Jeff and Kellie Houston
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Anybrew
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« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2011, 04:47:44 PM »

I agree with Wits end, it look very much like an Olive tree especially the leaves and the flowers.

Cheers
Anybrew
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Mardak
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« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2011, 04:41:19 AM »

Bush or feral olive trees, heaps of them just like the pics around Ayson's reserve just outside of Elmore, Victoria. make a lovely grove when relocated to ya back paddock.
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yantabulla
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« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2011, 03:47:18 AM »

Yep looks like an olive to me

Yanta
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Lone
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« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2011, 12:36:10 AM »

Thanks for the replies.


Hi,

It's from the genus Flindersia, many of which occur in the rainforest. It doesn't look like it's anywhere near the rainforest which may help you identify it.

Danulsarn,  when I check with google, I can't find any Flindersia that look like this tree.  Most have bigger leaves and as you say are in rainforest areas.   Could you be more specific?

Bush or feral olive trees, heaps of them just like the pics around Ayson's reserve just outside of Elmore, Victoria. make a lovely grove when relocated to ya back paddock.

Again, when I check pictures of bush olives they are nothing like my tree!  I can't find any type of olive that looks like this.

Lone

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bud1
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« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2011, 08:10:08 AM »

shucks miss lone; i am from the south but not quite that far. looks like something i would love to have, but my suplyer is kinda lite footed about getting me seeds . been 2yrs. and havent gotten my lemon sented, pink flowering gum tree
he coulda glued the seed between his toes and told customs they were bad corns.  you take care lady and good luck with your search
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Lone
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« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2011, 10:40:11 PM »

Thanks Budwick. 

I planted a lemon scented gum (Corymbia citriodora) a few weeks ago, but it's got white flowers not the pink ones.  I'm also going to get some timber from a felled lemon scented gum tree. I know your "seed mule" is pretty sneaky.  I wish I could have seen your expression when he sneaked up behind you in Mississippi.

Lone
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Danulsarn
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« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2011, 07:04:14 PM »

Hi Lone.

A lot of Flindersia are popularly known for their timber - Qld Maple (Flindersia brayleyana), Aus Teak (F. australis) etc and they invariably occur in the rainforest. Online, it's pretty hard to find info on species from the western side of the ranges.

From your pics, the compund leaf with a terminal leaflet and winged rachis or central stalk, the flowers and bark all look like the genus Flindersia to me.

The give away is the seed pod which is very distinctive and similar amongst the genus. Do a quick search for a pic and you'll find plenty of images.

I'm not sure about the actual species - maybe it's the Scrub Leopardwood (F. dissosperma) or the Leopardwood (F. maculosa) which occur in drier parts and look similar to your pics.

If you really want to know, your best bet is to contact the Qld Herbarium. They will do a free ID for you. I can't seem post the link here but if you google "Queensland Herbarium Botanical Services" you'll get the link to their details.

Good luck.
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Lone
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« Reply #14 on: December 07, 2011, 06:16:45 AM »

Danalsarn,

I went for a trip to the back paddock, and since I've been away, seed pods have grown on the Mystery Tree.  This might help.  By the way, the leaves are pretty small, the largest about 42x5 mm.



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If this doesn't help you to identify it, then I'll contact the Queensland Herbarium.

And there's a treat for you too!  Right next to Mystery Tree we found a bush orange with a single flower at the top.  We might have to split it when it fruits though  Smiley



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Lone

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Danulsarn
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« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2011, 08:39:04 PM »

With the seed pod like that it's definitely a Flindersia. I couldn't tell you which one unfortunately - the smooth bark is a bit confusing but I'd say it's one of F.dissosperma or F. maculosa. Sorry I can't be of more help.

I'm sure the guys at the herbarium could tell you pretty quickly. I'd be interested to know.

Cheers
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Lone
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« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2011, 10:51:40 PM »

Thanks, Danulsarn,

Yes the photos I saw of the F. maculosa have very rough bark.  Unless it is a more mature form.  And I couldn't find photos of the bark of F. dissosperma.  At least I know it is not meant to be in the rainforest because it would be a miracle growing in these conditions.  It looks like the Queensland Herbarium wants a dried sample sent for identification, but I sent them an email in case they don't need it.

Lone
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Lone
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« Reply #17 on: December 07, 2011, 11:23:38 PM »

Hello, This is the reply I received from the Queensland Herbarium.

"It looks like Flindersia dissosperma. Flindersia maculosa is not recorded from your region."

Lone

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