Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 22, 2014, 02:17:06 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Open feeding makes sense to me.  (Read 4546 times)
TwoHoneys
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 355


Location: Cincinnati, Ohio


WWW
« on: June 21, 2011, 06:26:18 AM »

Last year, I fed sugar water in Ziplock bags placed on top of the frames. Essentially, I invited yellow jackets and robbing and lost half my hives to starvation because I didn't feed enough (it's a nuisance to open each hive and feed from a baggie, and I didn't do it as often as I should, and I paid for my nonchalance about it. This year, I'll feed more responsibly).

I've increased the number of hives from last year, and now that we're nearing our dearth season, I'm considering open feeding. My bees are scattered about several suburban(ish) yards (none smaller than an acre) and some rural fields. The largest number of hives in any location is 6 and the fewest is 3. I'll be feeding a total of 18 hives.

I know I'll get neglectful if I feed from those danged messy Ziplock baggies (and most of these hives have top-entrances...I don't love the idea of placing baggies right on top of the frames near the entrance for every yellow jacket in town to find), so I think I'll try open feeding.

Problem is...I don't know how to do it. Yet.

My questions:
-What sized container would serve 3-6 hives without having to refill it every day? I don't mind filling each week, but I have to travel a bit to reach some of these hives, and I'd rather not do it more than once a week.
-Should I leave the lid off? Prop it open a little bit? Keep the lid closed and cut slits around the top?
-How far from the hives should I place the feeder?
-Is this a better approach than feeding from the baggies? If not, what do you do?

-Liz


Logged

"In a dream I returned to the river of bees" W.S. Merwin
BjornBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3773


Location: Lewisberry, PA


« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2011, 06:30:56 AM »

This page may help:

http://www.bjornapiaries.com/feedingoptions.html

Logged

www.bjornapiaries.com
www.pennapic.org
Please Support "National Honey Bee Day"
Northern States Queen Breeders Assoc.  www.nsqba.com
TwoHoneys
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 355


Location: Cincinnati, Ohio


WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2011, 06:40:48 AM »

Thanks for the link, BjornBee...I'm always surprised at how creative some people can get with this stuff...I wish I thought in terms of more possibilities.

But tell me the benefit of using multiple Boardman feeders as opposed to a single larger container (such as a 5 gallon bucket or a drum). A bucket seems more transportable and refilling it seems as if it would be simpler. I could haul full buckets in the car, replace the empty ones, haul the empty ones home to refill.
Logged

"In a dream I returned to the river of bees" W.S. Merwin
John Pfaff
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 78

Location: Vicksburg, MS


WWW
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2011, 09:55:13 AM »

I use chicken waterers with glass beads to keep the bees from drowning.
Logged

caticind
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 385

Location: Carrboro, North Carolina

Nothing sweeter...


« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2011, 10:37:54 AM »

The bucket is more convenient, but more apt to drown bees.  If you use a big tub, make sure it has a LARGE opening or has the lid off (lest you trap a lot of bees inside), and plenty of float material for the bees to cling to.
Logged

The bees would be no help; they would tumble over each other like golden babies and thrum wordlessly on the subjects of queens and sex and pollen-gluey feet. -Palimpsest
L Daxon
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 669


Location: Oklahoma City


« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2011, 10:42:53 AM »

Why do you think you need to feed your bees? Did they not put up enough stores during the main flow?
Logged

linda d
deknow
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 737


Location: Massachusetts


WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2011, 08:03:26 AM »

if you open feed your strong colonies will get most of the feed...weaker ones with smaller populations will get the least.
deknow
Logged
hilreal
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 69

Location: FORT WAYNE, IN


« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2011, 08:15:20 AM »

Remember, you will be also be feeding every bee, yellow jacket, hornet, etc. within a 2 mile area with open feeding.  Would you move closer to me:)  Seriously, I would investigate hive top feeders.  There are several models available that will hold 2 gallons of syrup which will last for quite a while.  I like the styrofoam version from Betterbee.  They are easy to fill and you can restirct top entrances which reduces robbing.

I also reitterate the comment about why you are needing to feed this time of year if you had any kind of decent flow at all in the spring.  Did you harvest every frame of honey they stored this spring?  I used to live not far from you and there should be a fair amount of things in bloom now, clovers, all sorts of weeds, alfalfa, etc.  Later blooming things like hyssop should be starting too.  They might be finding more than you think.
Logged
TwoHoneys
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 355


Location: Cincinnati, Ohio


WWW
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2011, 09:21:17 AM »

For ldaxon and hilreal:
Seventeen of my 18 hives are first-year hives, and I haven't harvested a drop of honey from any of them. Nor do I plan to.

I'm not ready to begin feeding yet...however, I have a strong feeling that I'll need to feed this fall...beginning late August or early September...they've spent most of their time building comb this spring, and there's not much at all in the way of stored honey in any hive. I'm formulating a plan in the event I need to feed (which I think is highly likely).

I've got a couple of hive top feeders, but I'd have to buy a whole lot of those things to outfit all these hives. And I hope to increase the number of hives next year, so I don't want to keep spending the money or use up storage space for all those feeders if something else works just as well.


For deknow: If there's enough syrup, why wouldn't the weaker colonies get what they need as well?
Logged

"In a dream I returned to the river of bees" W.S. Merwin
deknow
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 737


Location: Massachusetts


WWW
« Reply #9 on: June 22, 2011, 10:08:55 AM »

...not if they dont have enough foragers to collect it...they also need bees to raise brood for the winter.
you might consider using the top feeders on the strogest colony in each yard (putting them on weak colonoes will get them robbed in a dearth)....and move frames of stored feed into the weak ones.
deknow
Logged
caticind
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 385

Location: Carrboro, North Carolina

Nothing sweeter...


« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2011, 10:09:56 AM »

Glad you're planning to do this in the fall.  If I were wanting to harvest honey and one of my neighboring beekeepers was open-feeding syrup, that would really bother me.  Not that I could do anything about it, but open feeding does draw bees from way beyond your own yard.
Logged

The bees would be no help; they would tumble over each other like golden babies and thrum wordlessly on the subjects of queens and sex and pollen-gluey feet. -Palimpsest
muradulislam
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 43


Location: Mansehra, Pakistan


« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2011, 10:32:32 AM »

thanx for this topic, i'm also considering feeding my bees for winter, hope i'll gain more information here.
Logged
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2011, 10:55:24 AM »

I've only open fed my bees during the Fall after blooms have died off and when we get above 50 degrees and bees are flying.  A five gallon bucket placed at least 100 yards away will only last about a day and a half with my five colonies, so if you want to open feed once a week, you'll be hauling several buckets to each site.  Remenber to put a big wad of hay inside to prevent drowning.

As was mentioned "just be sure there's a dearth on and don't try to sell or consume the honey" that would be naughty Smiley and nasty.

To divert yellow jackets, set up some traps nearby the feeding station.  I use pint sized canning jars w/ a tsp of any kind of jelly stired in some water (about half way).  It'll be full of yellowjackets in a day or two.  Remember to poke a couple small holes in tops of lids.  And, WATCH out for robbing as best you can (a wet blanket thrown over the colony being robbed helps).

thomas
« Last Edit: June 24, 2011, 06:19:51 AM by T Beek » Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #13 on: June 23, 2011, 12:45:17 AM »

.
Open feeding is not a correct way to feed bees. Makes no sence.
We have here 8 litre feeding boxes, 15 litres and 20 litres.

It depends on how much the hive has allready honey in combs but  15 litre is enough for winter in one box wintering.

The box must be full of food. Otherwise bees do not cap the food.

For little need 5 litre or so I pour directly into combs if bees are near to starve.
A nuc needs perhaps one litre.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Danger Brown
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Wiley, Colorado


« Reply #14 on: June 23, 2011, 01:30:26 AM »

I'm curious why feeding dry sugar doesn't seem to be more popular?
I guess syrup stimulates the queen to lay.
Fondant is better for winter feeding. (lower moisture and less prone to robbing)
But why would someone go to the trouble to make fondant or syrup if you can just pour some sugar straight out of the bag?

I must be missing something.
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #15 on: June 23, 2011, 09:19:34 AM »

I'm curious why feeding dry sugar doesn't seem to be more popular?
I guess syrup stimulates the queen to lay.

Only pollen patty feeding stimulates brooding. Sugar or honey doest not do it in any form.

Quote
Fondant is better for winter feeding. (lower moisture and less prone to robbing)

66% sugar syrup is the best in winter feeding[/quote]

Quote
I must be missing something.

I gues that it is real winter . Cold weather is not winter.
To eate dry sugar the bees need water. Under snow cover it does not succeed.

Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #16 on: June 23, 2011, 10:48:14 AM »

I put roughly 5 lbs of dry sugar on top of inner cover as a 'last step' in winter preparation before closing them up.  This coming Winter I'll be experimenting with candy boards.  Some colonies will make it to the sugar come Spring, because they've run out of stored honey.  Some colonies never touch it as they've got stored honey so I have to pitch it.

Most folks around the forum know that Finski keeps bees in one of the coldest environments on the planet so his advise on wintering is always appreciated even if its a bit condescending at times grin.  Finland is somewhat colder (40-50 below zero) and their Winter is about a month longer than North Wisconsin (We can reach 30-40 below).

Feeding dry sugar for a 'justin' case scenario' can be a matter of life or death for your bees.  I've found that the bees produce plenty of condensation to 'wet' down the sugar enough to make it digestable.  Upon first inspection in Spring I can usually find lots of cells filled w/ dry sugar and/or a harder/moist sugar with those colonies that found the sugar I left them.  Whether one believes in such things as bee gratitude or not, I certainly believe my bees appreciate finding the sugar and not starving.

thomas
« Last Edit: June 23, 2011, 11:10:51 AM by T Beek » Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
FRAMEshift
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1681


Location: North Carolina


« Reply #17 on: June 23, 2011, 10:56:08 AM »

I've found that the bees produce plenty of condensation to 'wet' down the sugar enough to make it digestable. 
thomas
That's what I thought.  Finski is saying his bees don't have enough moisture to use dry sugar.  Is he so much colder (and lower humidity) than you?  I would think that just the water produced by their metabolism would be enough. 
Logged

"You never can tell with bees."  --  Winnie-the-Pooh
FRAMEshift
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1681


Location: North Carolina


« Reply #18 on: June 23, 2011, 11:00:47 AM »

...not if they dont have enough foragers to collect it...they also need bees to raise brood for the winter.
you might consider using the top feeders on the strogest colony in each yard (putting them on weak colonoes will get them robbed in a dearth)....and move frames of stored feed into the weak ones.
deknow

So is top feeding done by "house bees" rather than foragers?  I don't know that I've ever seen any research on this point.  I thought that maybe the bees consider a top feeder to be outside the hive.  Or that it would be treated as nectar gathering even if it's inside.
Logged

"You never can tell with bees."  --  Winnie-the-Pooh
jaseemtp
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 324


Location: Weatherford Texas USA


« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2011, 11:16:23 AM »

Ok Liz
I am a first year beekeeper so what I have say should be taken with a grain of salt.   I to was frustrated with opening each hive to feed with the zip lock bag (17 colonies by the way)  So I used the 5 gallon chicken water with small stones in the dish part to keep the bees from drowning.  Well as far as feeding ALOT of bees quickly it worked great, but I also had alot of yellow jackets and wasp feeding there too.  About the stronger colonies getting more than there share of the syrup, well simply they have more bees to send out and retrieve the syrup than the weak ones.  Even with the small stones in the dish I still had a cup of dead bees every time I fed this way.  I have read that some folks cut up sponges and place them in the dish and that is suppose to help keep the number of dead bees down.  If you have not done an open feeding you should chek out youtube for it, it is crazy, all those bees pushing and shoving trying to get to the syrup.  Your bees will be shoulder to shoulder with ferel or other beekeepers bees and no telling who is carrying mites or different diseases.
SOO what I have started doing for feeding is using one quart mason jars turned upside down in an empty hive box ontop just over the frames.  This allowes each hive to get what they need at their own pace and with out competition.  My larger hives I use 4 one quart jars and it seems to last a week or so.  Another option is to use an inverted 3 - 5 gallon bucket that rest ontop of the hive with a hole cut in the roof of the hive to give them access.  Good luck
Jason
Logged

"It's better to die upon your feet than to live upon your knees!" Zapata
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2011, 11:20:03 AM »

Most of what I've read discribes "winter" bees as almost a diferent species with traits/duties summer bees don't practice; it must be the weather Undecided.  

For one, Winter bees can survive inside for more than six months!!!!!!  Going for as long as 3 months around here/without taking a poo.

Some, if not all, have the ability to create heat.  Just wild.  How anyone can say they hate bees is............(fill in the latest reason you've heard).

thomas
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #21 on: June 23, 2011, 11:37:05 AM »


Most folks around the forum know that Finski keeps bees in one of the coldest environments on the planet so his advise on wintering is always appreciated even if its a bit condescending at times grin.  Finland is somewhat colder (40-50 below zero) and their Winter is about a month longer than North Wisconsin (We can reach 30-40 below).


Ha ha ha. No one here feed dry sugar in winter here. It is nonsence.

Quote
 I've found that the bees produce plenty of condensation to 'wet' down the sugar enough to make it digestable.

You may calculate with biological knowledge that 25 kg winter food produces 10 kg water via cell respiration.

Bees natural system is that they have sugar stored in cells with 17% moisture. Then bees cap it that moisture does not go into food a<nd sytart to ferment.


Yes, I have nursed bees 48 years. I learned early that  I lead condensated water out via top entrance.
No problems.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #22 on: June 23, 2011, 11:42:49 AM »

.
My hives use 25 kg dry sugar during winter. How do you store that measure in the hive? It is a huge pile.

My bees stays in winte rest in October. Then they have cleansing flight in late March. So they stay in the hive 6 months without coming out. I do not touch hives during that time. After cleansing flight the continue wintering one month. They start to work in first of may when willows bust into bloom.

My place is at same level as Anchorage but we are not so stuff guyes like you are there without insulations.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #23 on: June 23, 2011, 11:46:19 AM »

 

For one, Winter bees can survive inside for more than six months!!!!!!  Going for as long as 3 months around here/without taking a poo.

S

Those who winter hives in cellars they keep hives 7 months there, from Ochtober to start of May.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #24 on: June 23, 2011, 01:13:26 PM »

So it goes......... Wink

thomas
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #25 on: June 23, 2011, 01:24:51 PM »

.
Another story is toy beekeeping. Bee are fed like aquarium fishes. In England some give Cristhmas evening dinner to they bees.

Some worry about winter feeding in July. Some start Spring feeding in December.

Some feed bees syrup all year around.

If folks do not know what to do, they feed some to bees or shake them. Allways must do something. In that situation they should sing to bees twinkle twinkle lonely star...

Mixing sugar and water is the most difficult thing in beekeeping.

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
BlueBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4167

Location: Mid Michigan


« Reply #26 on: June 23, 2011, 02:50:15 PM »

I’m almost looking forward to winter again and the lively debates about wintering bees again  Smiley

Insulation vs No insulation
Top entrances vs Bottom Entrances
Opened bottom screen vs closed bottom screen
Candyboard vs No Candy
Moisture vs Dry
Single deep vs Mediums vs 2 or 3 deeps
Heat vs No heat.
Logged
caticind
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 385

Location: Carrboro, North Carolina

Nothing sweeter...


« Reply #27 on: June 23, 2011, 04:01:49 PM »

In that situation they should sing to bees twinkle twinkle lonely star...
I dunno
Logged

The bees would be no help; they would tumble over each other like golden babies and thrum wordlessly on the subjects of queens and sex and pollen-gluey feet. -Palimpsest
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #28 on: June 23, 2011, 06:13:32 PM »

I’m almost looking forward to winter again and the lively debates about wintering bees again  Smiley

Insulation vs No insulation
Top entrances vs Bottom Entrances
Opened bottom screen vs closed bottom screen
Candyboard vs No Candy
Moisture vs Dry
Single deep vs Mediums vs 2 or 3 deeps
Heat vs No heat.


if you are a skillfull beekeeper, you know what to do. You need not mix your head.

Winter in Florida, winter in Alaska.

I know what to do. My learning curve has zero angle.

And there question was simple: how to feed sugar to bees. It is easy to learn.
You learn it in one day.
.
.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2011, 05:00:40 AM »

Finski; do your bees wear earplugs? grin
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
ncsteeler
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 10

Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #30 on: June 24, 2011, 07:13:41 AM »

Back to the question at hand. I stumbled on these a few years ago, $18 each is not bad, but I built some for almost nothing. Sits over the inner cover hole, then cover with a empty hive body, works great. Just use caution how many holes are in your lids inthe winter, they will leak with more than a 10 holes or so. I made 2 jar versions. but if you think you need to feed  alot a 4 jar would be great. reduce your entrances way down in the fall for feeding(I use SBB and reduced entrance all year), but it helps that it is all the way at the top inside the hive, much less robbing.

« Last Edit: June 24, 2011, 07:16:48 AM by eivindm » Logged
jaseemtp
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 324


Location: Weatherford Texas USA


« Reply #31 on: June 24, 2011, 08:37:14 AM »

BINGO!
ncsteeler, thats exactly what I use to feed my girls with. Quick and easy with little disruption to the hive.  I am not a fan of open feeding, I lose to many bees and feed to many wasp / hornets that way.
Logged

"It's better to die upon your feet than to live upon your knees!" Zapata
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #32 on: June 24, 2011, 09:36:07 AM »

Agreed; if you must feed, feed inside the hive (love the Zapata quote), however, in late fall once hives are closed for winter and temps climb un-expectantly into the fifties and bees are flying, I open feed as I've described earlier in this post.  It works for me and mine.

thomas
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
hilreal
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 69

Location: FORT WAYNE, IN


« Reply #33 on: June 24, 2011, 10:04:13 AM »

I think you will be surprised how much honey you will have by September.  Late summer and fall flows in southern OH can be pretty good if weather cooperates so I wouldn't be too sure about having to feed just yet.

Could move some brood from stronger hives to weaker ones to even things out.

As far as the dry sugar on top I started doing it a few years back and am a believer.  I place a sheet of newspaper on top and then a 5 pound bag.  Most beeks in my area lost 50% plus this past winter.  I lost 1 out of 15 and that one was pretty weak going into winter.  Every hive was into the dry sugar by early March.

Cheap insurance.
Logged
Danger Brown
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Wiley, Colorado


« Reply #34 on: June 24, 2011, 01:11:13 PM »

Thanks Finski and T Beek! Good stuff.
I saw 2 people mentioned 5 lbs of dry sugar going into winter. Do you pour it out of the package on newspaper? or are you just leaving it in the paper packaging from the store and letting the bees chew into it?
Logged
VolunteerK9
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1647

Location: Southeast Tennessee

Gamecock fan in UT land.


« Reply #35 on: June 24, 2011, 01:19:56 PM »

Thanks Finski and T Beek! Good stuff.
I saw 2 people mentioned 5 lbs of dry sugar going into winter. Do you pour it out of the package on newspaper? or are you just leaving it in the paper packaging from the store and letting the bees chew into it?

Put the newspaper directly on top of the frames and pour the sugar on top of the newspaper.
Logged
Danger Brown
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Wiley, Colorado


« Reply #36 on: June 24, 2011, 01:36:38 PM »

Thanks VolunteerK9. I had seen people talk about that technique. How many layers of newspaper should be used?
Logged
VolunteerK9
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1647

Location: Southeast Tennessee

Gamecock fan in UT land.


« Reply #37 on: June 24, 2011, 02:29:33 PM »

I use one and cut a small slit in the middle of it.
Logged
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #38 on: June 24, 2011, 02:59:52 PM »

I use top entrances on my Langs, a small cut in the 'bottom of inner cover."  I pour dry sugar on top and all around the inner cover hole and cover w/ an empty 'ventilated' super.

thomas
« Last Edit: June 25, 2011, 07:12:48 AM by T Beek » Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Danger Brown
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Wiley, Colorado


« Reply #39 on: June 24, 2011, 03:05:10 PM »

Thanks guys! I appreciate that. Feel like I need to be strategizing for winter already.
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #40 on: June 24, 2011, 04:49:20 PM »

.
I have here mainflow started. Spring rape is opening buds, raspberry is over half blooming and first fireweed are red.

I trust that I get again real honey and I need not feed sugar to bees to make bigger yield.

i cannot understand that jar collection outside. Are you cleaning second hand jars for consumption?
 

xxxx

I put 3 hives on 25 hectar canola field. I hope that  they get something. It is windy place. Too big field mere canola.  grin
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #41 on: June 24, 2011, 11:13:56 PM »

Back at the beginning of this dialogue the question was asked what was wrong with Boardman feeders.

Nothing, I use them a lot but they must be used properly to prevent robbing.

Use of the Boardman is easily done with 2 feeders per hive with the entrance located between the feeders, arrange feeders and any needed reducer slats so that there is less than 2 inches of entrance space on an 8 or 10 frame hive.  For a 5 frame nuc no further entrance reduction is necessary other than the 2 feeders.
If only one feeder is being used be sure to use some type of entrance reducer so that the feeder is placed next to the edge of the entrance and use some type of reduce configuration so that less than 2 inches of actual entrance area is available to the bees.   

For a single Boardman feeder, where F is the feeder, x is the reducer, and E is the entrance the configuration should look like this: FXEX
For a double Boardman feed it can look like this: FXEXF or in the case of a nuc: FEF

These options places access as far as possible from any robber bees and allows the home bees to best defend their hive.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
adamant
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 337


Location: sewell n.j.


« Reply #42 on: October 28, 2013, 03:57:31 PM »


To divert yellow jackets, set up some traps nearby the feeding station.  I use pint sized canning jars w/ a tsp of any kind of jelly stired in some water (about half way).  It'll be full of yellowjackets in a day or two.  Remember to poke a couple small holes in tops of lids.  And, WATCH out for robbing as best you can (a wet blanket thrown over the colony being robbed helps).

thomas
Thomas, explain your yellow jacket trap more please
Logged
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #43 on: October 28, 2013, 04:21:47 PM »

Wow a 2 year old thread  cool

Whenever I Open feed (at least 100 yards from beeyard) with sugar syrup I place a few traps nearby as described above.  While a thick jelly mix works pretty good I've found that a fist full of raw meat with a little water (enough to cover meat and drown those YJ) placed inside the jar (any size with pencil sized holes in lid) works even better.  Jelly traps used to get some bees too  Sad and that' is no good.  Cured that by baiting the YJ w/ meat, since they are carnivores and honeybees being vegan ignore it.

Good luck!  I hate YJ!
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
adamant
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 337


Location: sewell n.j.


« Reply #44 on: October 28, 2013, 05:51:30 PM »

Wow a 2 year old thread  cool

Whenever I Open feed (at least 100 yards from beeyard) with sugar syrup I place a few traps nearby as described above.  While a thick jelly mix works pretty good I've found that a fist full of raw meat with a little water (enough to cover meat and drown those YJ) placed inside the jar (any size with pencil sized holes in lid) works even better.  Jelly traps used to get some bees too  Sad and that' is no good.  Cured that by baiting the YJ w/ meat, since they are carnivores and honeybees being vegan ignore it.

Good luck!  I hate YJ!

thank you
Logged
edward
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1194


Location: BÖNAN SWEDEN

FEED ME HONEY or I`ll smash your screen !


« Reply #45 on: October 28, 2013, 07:35:40 PM »

I put 3 hives on 25 hectar canola field. I hope that  they get something. It is windy place. Too big field mere canola.

A friend had scales on a few hives that are in and amongst the canola field where the canola plants shelter the hives from the winds, he also had hives at the edge of the fields were they where not sheltered from the harsh winds that can blow in the open terrain.

The hives that were sheltered by the plants brought .5kg more necktar each day back to the hive.

When the bees have to work less at keeping a constant temperature in the hive the harvest increases  Wink


mvh Edward  tongue
Logged
pembroke
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 97

Location: central KY


« Reply #46 on: October 29, 2013, 03:16:22 PM »

I've read several of the replies and I agree using the hive top feeders are the best for me. I put one on each hive and haul sugar water in a 4 gal containers closed top.  Pull up to hive and take off top of container and fill up feeder and move to next hive. To keep from robbing I place a screen over the top of my feeders and put on inner cover and outer cover. I have 1 inch drilled holes for entrances to hive. I plug the very top one when feeding. Helps reduce robbing.  Pembroke
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.788 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page August 16, 2014, 08:15:53 PM