Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
September 30, 2014, 06:33:29 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(1)  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Removal in Denver  (Read 1127 times)
Boom Buzz
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 165


Location: Longmont, CO


« on: July 05, 2011, 06:32:58 PM »


A homeowner called to have his second removal in two years.  He said he though a swarm had just moved in.  Saw scout bees in his garage and two days later he gets stung in the evening while in bed.  This caused him to do some checking around the next day and he found a bees entering at the seam between brick and wood siding.  So as you can see from the small amount of nice new white comb, he was right.  There was no brood nor eggs from what I can see.  A little bit of pollen and nectar.  Good amount of bees.

Had a small problem.  The bee vac hose clogged right away.  Not enough suction.  Could not get the hose unclogged.  So grudgingly I hooked the hose directly up to the shop vac knowing this would doom the bees in the hose but thinking it would at least clear the hose.  The hose did clear, and to my delight, nearly all of the bees survived.  They were just holding on in the shop vac tub.  I think the way the clogged cleared it must have pulled them through withe less force.  I did not even want to look in the shop vac tub because I did not want to see a pile of dead bees.  I am glad I did.  I left them in for the ride home and when I opened up the vac in the bee yard they were ready to fly.  Left the vac in front of the hive with the vac box on it and within an hour most of the bees were in the hive or on the outside.  Phewwwwww.   Thank you Lord!

Home by 2 with a cold one to cool me down.  Sorry about the pics - some not so clear and mayb a duplicate in there, but I can't get it to delete...

John




Uploaded with ImageShack.us

The homeowner below had done a great job in prepping for us.  He'd had a hive removed last year that left a huge honey mess so he was prepared this time...


Uploaded with ImageShack.us



Uploaded with ImageShack.us



Uploaded with ImageShack.us


Uploaded with ImageShack.us



Uploaded with ImageShack.us
[IMG=http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/7622/imag0180i.th.jpg]http://[/img]

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Uploaded with ImageShack.us
Bees in the bee vac


Uploaded with ImageShack.us
Logged
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8137

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2011, 09:05:39 PM »

Pics look great.
Logged
schawee
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 973


Location: PAULINA,LOUISIANA


« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2011, 09:20:50 PM »

good job.         .....schawee
Logged

BEEKEEPER OF THE SWAMP
Sparky
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 804


Location: Hagerstown MD


« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2011, 09:51:45 PM »

Nice pics. Thanks !! for sharing. grin Looks like another colony has a fighting chance to start over.
Logged
Mike Tuggle
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 46


Location: Rhinebeck, NY


« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2011, 10:48:57 PM »

Great job of masking off the area to control dust and keep the girls under control.  I could zoom in and see what looked like ratchet-clamps on the end of your temporary joists -- did you make special end-piece adaptors or is there some kind of ready-made ones I just haven't seen before?

Well done!
Logged
Boom Buzz
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 165


Location: Longmont, CO


« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2011, 12:15:37 AM »

Thanks for the comments guys!

Mike the home owner did the masking off.  He sank some time and money into it and did it right.  I did not study the clamps on top of the 2x4s but it was a nifty set up.  He had a cut out done last year and it sounds like the bee remover was not quite prepared for all honey and it made a mess.  So this time he did it himself, and the honey was minimal, but the clean up was easy...  grin
Logged
BeeV
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 49

Location: Lafollette Tennessee


« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2011, 06:55:57 PM »

Looks like the guy just used mini bar clamps reversed to spread. Slick.



Uploaded with ImageShack.us
Logged

If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is probably not for you.
PeeVee
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 220


Location: Deposit, NY


« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2011, 08:55:23 PM »

Nice job of localizing the work area, I've seen that system advertised in "Fine Home Building" magazine.

Does look like it could be hot working in that plastic enclosure though.
Logged

-Paul VanSlyke - Cheers from Deposit,NY
Boom Buzz
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 165


Location: Longmont, CO


« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2011, 02:21:04 AM »

BeeV - yes I think you are right...these were clamps reversed to spread against the 2x4 and ceiling.


So now the bad news - the bees absconded... embarassed

And the good news...after searching the orchard I found them in the apple tree.  I walked by this tree probably 3 times before I finally saw them.  Only about 50 feet from the hive...



Uploaded with ImageShack.us

So I got them back in the hive, but had to leave to go out of town right afterward...

And now after returning home the next day I find they absconded AGAIN   evil
OY!


Tomorrow I will look for them again but I think they are gone... :'(

Logged
TwoHoneys
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 356


Location: Cincinnati, Ohio


WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2011, 07:25:06 AM »

Is absconding common with cut-out hives? I hived my only cut out of the season into a Langstroth hive, and they tried to abscond three times (I had a queen excluder in place, so each time, they returned). A week after removing the excluder, they took off again, but I was lucky enough to see it happen and then captured them. This last time, I put them in a top-bar hive (with a frame of larva and brood!), and they're still there a week later.

I'd love to hear from others who've done a few cut outs: How do you get your bees to stick around? I get the feeling they don't love being moved onto frames.

-Liz
Logged

"In a dream I returned to the river of bees" W.S. Merwin
TwoHoneys
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 356


Location: Cincinnati, Ohio


WWW
« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2011, 07:26:10 AM »

(Sorry...accidental double post)
Logged

"In a dream I returned to the river of bees" W.S. Merwin
Boom Buzz
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 165


Location: Longmont, CO


« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2011, 10:30:51 AM »

OKay...good news again... found them about 30 feet away   grin



Uploaded with ImageShack.us

You can see the swarm in foreground and hive and background...


Uploaded with ImageShack.us

I will attempt to re-hive today using some lemongrass oil and a frame of brood...wish me luck!

John




Logged
iddee
Galactic Bee
******
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 6078

Location: Randleman, NC


« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2011, 10:36:34 AM »

Use a different hive. They don't like that one. Also use a queen excluder on the bottom board.
Logged

"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.981 seconds with 23 queries.

Google visited last this page August 24, 2014, 07:30:44 PM