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Author Topic: Langstroth as a warre ?  (Read 1148 times)
BeehiveProject
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« on: June 08, 2011, 09:34:01 AM »

Been pouring over a ton of information.  Trying to nail down the best hive to go with.  I like the Warre concept a lot, but, most of the Russian suppliers in my region only offer nucs.  So, no dump of packaged bees, but OK... at least some brood already in progress.   The 8 frame English hive from Brushy Mountain I like.  The question is, or has anyone, used a Langstroth as a Warre.. if so, just stack brood on top and feed empty boxes in from the bottom?  Quilt top still used? I'd imagine a modification would be needed to cover the quilt top with the roof...   thoughts?   Trying to get a hive design that is best for the bees and ventilation, warmth during the winter ... etc..  here in NC
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G3farms
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« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2011, 09:47:47 AM »

Not trying to be a stick in the mud here and not trying to deter you from trying new and different things.

If this is your first hive of bees I would stick with a couple of Lang hives with wood frames and wax foundation, you just can't go too bad wrong here. The frames are easy to manipulate and all of the gear is interchangeable and readily available.

 
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see my swarms and cut outs at https://www.youtube.com/user/soapy22bullet?feature=mhee

those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

Bees will be bees and do as they please!
BeehiveProject
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« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2011, 10:23:27 AM »

G3 appreciate that...  been a while since I was in the hive world... getting back into it.. so, you know, as I re-educate, your advice is well taken.  Nothing says I can't transition to a Warre down the road.  Really trying to take a non-standard approach this go around. The dependance on chemicals, in a lot of the standard info, is a bit concerning to me.  Trying to give as "natural" a hive for the bees to do their thing and harvest only extra honey produced, if that. 

So, we'll see where this goes....    Think I'll go hug a tree now and east some bark...    grin
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caticind
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« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2011, 05:21:45 PM »

I thought...and correct me if I'm wrong...that Warres were best suited for colder climates?

I'm a chemical-free tree-chewing beek myself (in NC), and I keep in long hives.  Think of a pragmatic cross between a Lang and a TBH.  These are custom built, not commercially available (well...PM me if you're especially interested in getting one), but are just a 4 ft long box with a rabbet.  Screen attached to the bottom, put tops on, voila! cheap alternative hive.  They take standard Lang size frames with or without foundation.  You wouldn't want to run a commercial operation with them, but they are excellent for stationary keeping.  Best part is never having to lift more than 10 pounds...
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The bees would be no help; they would tumble over each other like golden babies and thrum wordlessly on the subjects of queens and sex and pollen-gluey feet. -Palimpsest
Michael Bush
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« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2011, 01:27:52 AM »

>I thought...and correct me if I'm wrong...that Warres were best suited for colder climates?

I think eight frame medium Langstroths are best suited for colder climates, but even ten frame deeps do ok.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
BeehiveProject
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« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2011, 07:59:52 PM »

Thanks all for the input... Carborro eh?   Chapel Hill myself.. back in the day...
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caticind
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« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2011, 10:43:46 AM »

Yeah, it's a great place for urban keeping.  Lots of folks interested, neighbors are much less knee-jerk about having hives around.
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The bees would be no help; they would tumble over each other like golden babies and thrum wordlessly on the subjects of queens and sex and pollen-gluey feet. -Palimpsest
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