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Author Topic: How to Discern the "Nectar Flow"  (Read 1595 times)
FrogPond
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« on: June 25, 2005, 06:19:33 PM »

There is a lot of talk about the "nectar flow" as being on, off, heavy, light, etc. Just how is one supposed to know this? Is this decision made through an indirect observation of the bees, or is there some way to directly observe the plants to tell if there is a "flow" on or not?

On a related note, someone here mentioned a list of plants known to be pollenated by bees. Where can that list be found? Is it correct to assume that "pollenation = nectar collection"? Are there instances where one occurs but not the other?

Thanks for the opinions. (I am learning that is almost all there is in this hobby... "opinions".  wink )
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2005, 07:09:39 PM »

Quote from: FrogPond

Thanks for the opinions. (I am learning that is almost all there is in this hobby... "opinions".  wink )


Well. That's your opinion.  Cheesy
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leominsterbeeman
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« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2005, 07:35:17 PM »

Quote
Is it correct to assume that "pollenation = nectar collection"?


No.  Everything depends on where you live.  Up here, there are blooms that produce pollen  in Februay and if it's warm enough for the bees to fly they will collect the pollen.   Pollen is available to the bees before the nectar flows.  In the spring,  they will mostly collect pollen (because there is no nectar flowing.  

Quote
Thanks for the opinions. (I am learning that is almost all there is in this hobby... "opinions".


Now you are learning!  Another thing about beekeepers,  they are
always willing to share an "opinion",  even when it is not asked for.
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TREBOR
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« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2005, 11:35:38 PM »

ok you guys, but no one answered his question or only half of it!
 I learn alot from other peoples questions
How does one know about the flow?
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Joseph Clemens
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« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2005, 07:26:27 AM »

My clue is when the little ladies are flying from my apiary blind (a wall of shade-cloth 6' high, along all 3 sides and over the top with a 1 foot wide opening just above the hive entrances) in large numbers, a cloud of bees above the blind opening. At the same time vigorous activity, coming and going, is evident at nearly every colonies entrance. Many of those returning are carrying pollen. More difficult to determine if those with a distended abdomen are carrying nectar, stolen honey, sugar water, soda pop, honeydew, or water. Another clue was when I scraped some burr comb containing honey onto a board immediately adjacent to the apiary. About 6 feet away and the bees didn't even bother with it. Two days later I rinsed it off with water from a hose.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2005, 07:44:54 PM »

When I see new white wax in the hives, it's usually the flow.  Also a lot of nectar (it shakes out of the frames).
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Michael Bush
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