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Author Topic: Water Sources  (Read 2297 times)

Offline bassman1977

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Water Sources
« on: June 25, 2005, 03:14:29 PM »
What's the general rule for distances of water sources?  I have a stream about 50-75 yards from my hive.  Is this sufficiant or should I put an artificial source a little closer by?  Thanks.
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Offline Jerrymac

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Water Sources
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2005, 03:28:00 PM »
I have no idea where my bees get water. I have an above ground pool, never see them there. I have a small stock tank with feeder guppies in it and never see them there. I don't think they are stealing the water from the nieghbors horses. I had water for awhile right by the hive and never saw them there either. The only time I did was when I had some old comb in an aquarium and dumped water on the comb, they really sucked that up. I think it was to get what ever left over goodies there was in the comb that the water loosened up. Later on I would put water in the comb and they wouldn't mess with it.

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Offline bassman1977

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Water Sources
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2005, 03:45:13 PM »
I thought I would put some water out by the hive hoping that would help with the slowness in their comb building but being that it's getting hotter and hotter, I'd have to fill the water every other day, which would get old in a hurry.  I guess these ladies know what they are doing so I'll just keep on doing what I've been doing...nothing.  Last time I was down in the hive it did look as if they were starting to build more comb in my bottom deep but it isn't at the pace when I first started the hive and was feeding.  I see no reason to start feeding again just to force building.  Who needs a hive full of sugar water?  I guess they'll do their thing when they are ready.  Do they use water for anything other than their own drinking and cooling of the hive?
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Offline drobbins

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Water Sources
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2005, 06:21:47 PM »
I've been keeping an entrance feeder full of water, with just a bit of syrup and a few drops of winergreen, on my hive so far (I'm a rookie)
they take a quart in 2 days     :shock:

Dave

Offline Archie

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Water Sources
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2005, 08:09:11 AM »
My bees seem to like water that has been standing around for awhile.  I fill a small pail with water, put  a lot of weeds on the top so they can stay out ot the water.  After a few days there a lot of bees coming and going.  Oh, I place the pail of weeds and water on the other side of the lawn in full sun.
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Offline Miss Chick-a-BEE

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Water Sources
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2005, 09:43:36 AM »
My bees general drink out of shallow stagnant water too - anywhere and everywhere. I've seen them at a drain pipe near the hive, drinking from the dogs water bowl, also from the hydroponic system, out of buckets and pails with rain water, and at the pool. Around here it rains often enough to make puddles all over the place so I don't worry about it.

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Offline Apis629

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Water Sources
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2005, 10:19:55 PM »
Quote
Do they use water for anything other than their own drinking and cooling of the hive?



Honey bees also use water to dilut honey to be fed to the older larvae.

Offline TREBOR

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Water Sources
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2005, 01:17:07 AM »
I have a med. sized stream about 20 yards from 12 hives and have see
them drinking from muddy puddles twice as far away!
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Offline Horns Pure Honey

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Water Sources
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2005, 02:14:39 AM »
My pond is the same distance away as yours and it is close enough, you will see alot of bees there, they like the muddy water on the edge of the banks. You will usally see a bunch a straight line from the hives. :D
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Offline bassman1977

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Water Sources
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2005, 09:50:40 AM »
Thanks for all the replys.
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Anonymous

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Water Sources
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2005, 02:27:49 PM »
Quote from: TREBOR
I have a med. sized stream about 20 yards from 12 hives and have see
them drinking from muddy puddles twice as far away!
    PUZZLING   :?


I've been told that they prefer stagnant water.  Maybe that's why.

I keep a plastic, concrete mixing tub out in front of my hives.  I put a couple pavers in it at an angle so they can crawl up and down without drowning too many.  At first, they didn't seem to like it, but I see them there all the time now.  It's only 10 feet or so in front of the hives.

Offline bill

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Water Sources
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2005, 11:44:54 PM »
I have noticed that my bees use the emiters on my drip lines for water and anywhere there is a leak in a faucet or hosethey are really carrying a lot of water right now, I have noticed that the yellow jackets use the same water supplies that the bees use.there is also a very small wasp or bee with the same markings as a honey bee that also gets its water there. I never see ants getting water tho.
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