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Author Topic: 1st year newbie  (Read 619 times)
Terry N
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« on: May 14, 2011, 03:54:37 PM »

Have not been able to check hive in while do to constant rainy weather, does seem their is not alot of bees yet..do you think they swarmed or got a disease and if they did swarm will they produce a new queen? They are gathering pollen though. Thanks
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AllenF
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« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2011, 04:10:11 PM »

You need to open them up to see if everything is going well.   They could be sick or lost their queen if you think the numbers are low.  Were are you located? 
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S.M.N.Bee
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« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2011, 05:14:52 PM »


Like Allen sead inspection is very important. Please make sure you are feeding them enough. Rainy weather is like a dearth. The bees can not get out to gather pollen or nectar so feeding them is crucial.

John
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2011, 04:20:13 PM »


Like Allen sead inspection is very important. Please make sure you are feeding them enough. Rainy weather is like a dearth. The bees can not get out to gather pollen or nectar so feeding them is crucial.

John

This time of year the bees are bringing back more nectar and honey than you may think.
If you overfeed the bees they will back fill the brood chamber and the queen won't be able to provide enough eggs for the hive to grow in population.  This is called being honey bound.
If you must feed do it by feeding one week and not feeding the next so the bees can process and use or cap what they have.
If the hive is not growing and you have undrawn frames in the hive move the outer (storage frames) frames occuppied by the bees over one frame and place an undrawn frame between it and the other frames the bees are on.  Do this on each side of the bee cluster.
The bees will move off of the storage frames and begin drawing out the new frames, this will use up some of the stores from the brood chamber.  It will also provide new combs for the queen to aly eggs in.  This action enlarges the brood chamber while curing the honey bound problem, therby allowing the hive to begin to increase its population. 

Bees will move off of storage combs but will not move off of brood combs. 
Bees will draw new comb when the population of the hive is sufficient to force the bees to occupy more space.  Bees only work under foot. 
If you allow a package to become honey bound they will stay nuc size forever, or they will dwindle and die because they can't rear enough brood to grow and might not even be able to rear enough brood to retain its initial size.
If you have bees in a hive that are only occupying a few frames, yet are making burr comb, the hive is oney bound, moving the frames is necessary to cure the problem.
Feeding only makes this condition worse, regardless of the weather.
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AliciaH
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« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2011, 04:56:24 PM »

Terry:  As I'm sure you've heard, each hive has a different personality.  Some hives will push the boundaries on rain and fly anyway (as long as it's not too cold), but some will tuck in nice and tight until the weather clears.  I wouldn't worry too much, depending on what your hive's condition was the last time you inspected, BUT that next inspection will be crucial.

Maybe you could provide a bit more info on how long your had them and what the hive looked like, and when, you were in last?

Also, don't forget to tell us where you are.
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