Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 28, 2014, 11:00:35 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Nitrile Gloves  (Read 4747 times)
FrogPond
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 57


Location: Hocking County, Ohio


WWW
« on: June 21, 2005, 07:29:38 AM »

This might seem a little silly, but has anyone determined if the new nitrile gloves (the bright blue things) reduce stings?

My understanding is the nitrile rubber glove was developed for use in medical applications to prevent (or at least reduce) needle sticks. They are nice and tight-fitting like latex gloves but are specifically marketed to "reduce punctures." I picked up a pack at Home Depot (they are cheap) and have been using them, but I don't have the guts to try inducing a sting!

Just wondered what others have experienced. I don't like wearing bulky gloves (and don't) but these seem thin enough and tight enough to let me feel what is going on. If it helps eliminate stings, it might be worth it. Any experience out there? Or better yet, any willing test subjects?  cheesy
Logged

Charles Fry, Amatuer Farmer & Entremanure
Frog Pond Acres   -    http://www.FPAcres.com - come by for a visit!
drgenegarris
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 38

Location: South Carolina


WWW
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2005, 12:36:11 PM »

I thought the main reason for the new nitrile gloves was because of Latex allergies.  I know that in a local hospital latex balloons are forbidden.

I prefer nitrile gloves myself.

Some people, I believe, are also allergic to the powder in the gloves.
Logged

bassman1977
"King Bee"
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1787

Location: Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania


« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2005, 12:59:09 PM »

You are absolutely correct with the allergys to the latex and the reasons for the gloves.
Logged

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(''')_(''')
beemaster
Site Founder
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6222


Location: Manchester, NJ

It is my pleasure to bring the forums to you.


WWW
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2005, 05:32:07 PM »

My main use for Nitrile Gloves has been when working with OIL BASED SOLVENTS - they are VERY resistant compared to Latex.

I can use a pair for nearly an hour when using parts cleaner (compared to a 5 minute MELT-DOWN with Latex) and still be going strong.

They have no stretch to them and I haven't used them with the bees yet (except to handle honey frames and propolis) but I tend to think they are NOT what I want to use when working the hives - they color is one issue, I think they will really get the ATTENTION of the bees (unwanted attention that is) and since they don't stretch, they are LOOSE at the wrist, which makes for easy entry by bees.

I'll stick with my thin and well worn leather gloves for the bees and use the Nitrile elsewhere. Still, they are a great product and I think well worth the money.
Logged

NJBeemaster my YOUTUBE Video Collection
Follow us on TWITTER
SKYPE NJBeemaster - include your FORUM NAME in contact request
My Personal FACEBOOK Page


"All donations to our forums are greatly appreciated"
Please click HERE to help support our forum.
Miss Chick-a-BEE
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 300


Location: Eastman, Georgia USA


« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2005, 05:56:03 PM »

I have purple nitrile gloves, and decided to try them one day on the hive. I changed my mind though when I saw how loose it was at the wrist. Like John said, the bright color and looseness could be a problem. I wasn't daring enough. Smiley

Beth
Logged
BEECANUCK
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9

Location: Canada


« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2005, 01:19:23 AM »

Nitrile gloves are designed to tear when they receive a needle prick for example, where as it is more difficult to notice a hole in latex. So to answer your question it will be more obvious that you have been stung (if the pain is not enough) by the rip in the glove.
Logged
Yarra_Valley
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 167


Location: Healesville, Victoria, Australia


« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2005, 10:04:58 AM »

Quote
Nitrile gloves are designed to tear when they receive a needle prick for example, where as it is more difficult to notice a hole in latex. So to answer your question it will be more obvious that you have been stung (if the pain is not enough) by the rip in the glove.


That's spot on. I use nitrile gloves for first aid. They offer me two direct advantages. Firstly they protect me. If they are puntured they split open so I know I'm at risk of contamination. The second factor is that some people have an allergy to latex or the powder they a lubricated with. The other advantage for me with Nitrile gloves is that they are a nice blue colour, which makes them look more professional than the usual latex gloves. This helps to stop people that don't know what they're doing from trying to tell you to do something stupid, or worse yet, trying to become involved and doing someting stupid and incompetent to the casualty.

As far as beekeeping goes, wouldn't know. But if anyone is willing to let me know how they get on with their sting experiments, let me know!
Logged

Careful, my pets can smell your hives. Cool
asleitch
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 203


Location: UK


« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2005, 07:57:57 AM »

I don't wear anything other than nitrile gloves now. I haven't been stung through them once.

I do wear some cuffs though, as they are loose around my wrists.

Like this:



Adam
Logged
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6391


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2005, 09:51:04 AM »

I wear them once in a while.  Not to prevent stings,  but to prevent getting propolis all over my hands.  I did get stung once on the thumb while wearing them, and the glove did not split open.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


beandoggle66
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 8

Location: Zanesville, Ohio


« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2005, 01:48:43 PM »

I tried them out just yesterday changing the reducers and did not receive any stings. Bees were flying all around but the color blue did not seem to attract the bees tot he gloves.
Logged
bassman1977
"King Bee"
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1787

Location: Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania


« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2005, 01:53:59 PM »

Who would have known that blue and purple gloves would strike up so much discussion.   huh
Logged

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(''')_(''')
Jerrymac
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6047


Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #11 on: June 24, 2005, 01:59:26 PM »

Some people for some reason think darker colors attract bees. Or that bees don't like it and will attack or something. I wear blue jeans and long sleeved blue shirts. The bees don't care.
Logged

rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
bassman1977
"King Bee"
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1787

Location: Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania


« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2005, 02:21:41 PM »

I read somewhere (perhaps on this site) that bees can't see anything in the dark.  I wonder if that's where the dark clothing thing comes from.  Seeing a head and set of arms with no body attached would freak out anyone. Cheesy
Logged

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(''')_(''')
John Jones
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 9


Location: Stone Mountain, Georgia

Know how Bees feel


« Reply #13 on: June 22, 2008, 03:28:48 PM »

I have been using Nitrile Exam Gloves like doctors wear in hospitals. They are chemical proof, stick resistant (bee cannot sting through them), and you can feel what you are doing. Get a box and try them out. Grainger has several different ones. I personally use Kimbely-Clark purple Nitrile powder-free exam gloves number 55083. You can put in Kimberly-Clark 55083 in Google and get a hit.

See YouTube video on Nitrile gloves with me trying to stick a needle and knife through them.

John Jones
Stone Mountain, Ga.

Can you mark the queen in these?? Have not tired it. Doctors do surgery in them. Nurses find vanes and draw blood and do other task. I would have to say yes as a guess. I like the idea of not touching bees from one or group of hives without changing gloves. Much like nurses and doctors change gloves when interacting with patients. Makes sense on humans in the transfer of bacteria, virus, etc., makes sense on bees.

I took a stick pen and pushed against the nitrile glove. It did not go through the glove. I took my pocket knife and pushed it against the nitrile glove and it did not go through. I was pushing harder than any bee could push. Sting proof... dont know absolutely yet. Can you feel what you are touching better than gloves, absolutely. They sure help though. Try a pair. I am planning to do a youtube production on this concept. I will post the link if, when I get it done. I gave a few pair to Fred Rossman in Moultrie and told him to get some of his guys that are in the fields all day to give some feedback. He liked the concept enough to ask me to send him the information on the glove. They only have 3500 hives.

John Jones
Stone Mountain, Ga.





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Logged

John Jones
Stone Mountain, Georgia
Moonshae
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 988


Location: Helmetta,NJ


« Reply #14 on: June 22, 2008, 06:06:42 PM »

I don't really mind stings, honestly, so I don't wear gloves. Each one helps develop my tolerance to venom, and they teach you to slow down when moving around the bees. The only time I get stung is when I move my hands too quickly near the hive, and they react to the movement. Unless you have a lot of hives to work, the slowing down effect of stings is a good lesson.
Logged

"The mouth of a perfectly contented man is filled with beer." - Egyptian Proverb, 2200 BC
BeeHopper
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1122

Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2008, 06:47:33 PM »

I wear Nitrile gloves for one reason only, to keep propolis off my hands and fingers, however I can tell you that I have never been stung on the hand while wearing them and I don't know why.  grin
Logged
_Brenda_
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 109

Location: Illinois


« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2008, 10:09:53 PM »

I have a couple pair of the blue nitrile gloves. Unfortunately, I wasn't wearing the nitrile gloves, but plain latex gloves when I got stung yesterday.
So now I wonder if the blue ones will be good enough or do I need to get the purple ones?
Logged

Brenda
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #17 on: June 22, 2008, 10:59:53 PM »

I wear Nitrile gloves for one reason only, to keep propolis off my hands and fingers, however I can tell you that I have never been stung on the hand while wearing them and I don't know why.  grin

Hands no, wrists yes.  Guantlets can prevent that.  But I go into the bees with the intent to get stung it's my apitherapy treatment for the week.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
tillie
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1740


Location: Atlanta, GA

Bee in N Georgia on a Blackberry flower


WWW
« Reply #18 on: June 22, 2008, 11:57:14 PM »

John Jones, nice man that he is (and I have actually met him in person at a bee meeting), gave me some of the purple nitrile gloves and I like them.  I bought the blue ones from Gempler and have really loved them.  They allow me more dexterity than those clumsy leather gloves and they are comfortable to wear.  However, I have been stung through the blue gloves - not often but I am slow and gentle with my bees.  The only time I was stung through them was this hot hive - a swarm hive - and they attack me everywhere, every time I open the hive. 

I have not noticed any more bee activity on my hands than with leather gloves and if the bees seem too interested in my hands, it is both easier to notice and easier to get them to go somewhere else.

As was said in the above post, when I was stung, the glove did not rip as it is supposed to when penetrated.

I'm a fan of the nitrile glove - I like the purple ones John gave me.  They seem the same to me as the blue ones, but they are a little large for me, so I can't say for sure about their effectiveness.  I have not been stung through them yet.

Linda T in Atlanta, very happy in either blue or purple.
Logged

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"You never can tell with bees" - Winnie the Pooh


Click for Atlanta, Georgia Forecast" border="0" height="60" width="468
Flygirl
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 101


Location: Anchorage, Alaksa

~ It's never to late to have a happy childhood ~


« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2008, 02:18:10 AM »

Hi All ~

i just went to my local Mill & Feed & purchased a pair of Nitrile gloves for gardening.  They are a sea green color & have a long wrist length.  I tucked my bee suit sleeves into the gloves & put a rubber band around my wrist.  It was easier than I thought  it'd be since my finger dexterity was good / better with the nitrile gloves.

These gloves make it much better to handle my camera to take pictures when I'm in the hive Smiley

BTW~  I haven't been stung yet this year but I'm pretty quiet & gentle when in the hive.  I like to wear gloves but have gone gloveless too early in the season.  As the  hive grows I feel more secure gloved-up Smiley

FG
Logged

~ It's never too late to have a happy childhood ~
randydrivesabus
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1072

Location: Indian Valley, VA


« Reply #20 on: June 23, 2008, 06:44:03 AM »

i use green nitrile gloves and i've been stung through them the last 2 times i used them but this was because i pinched a bee when i was grabbing on the top bar of the frame. the stings were venomless however and not painful at all.
Logged
_Brenda_
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 109

Location: Illinois


« Reply #21 on: June 23, 2008, 07:33:01 AM »

i use green nitrile gloves and i've been stung through them the last 2 times i used them but this was because i pinched a bee when i was grabbing on the top bar of the frame. the stings were venomless however and not painful at all.

That's how I was stung too.  I don't know about venomless? As soon as I felt the "sting", I looked at my thumb, and did not see a stinger, but it did hurt quite a bit for a few hours. It didn't swell, just looked slightly red and shiney.
I did take a Benedryl, and bought some "Sting Kill" (benzocaine) for future use. I forgot all about using plantain. I have that growing just feet from the hive.
Logged

Brenda
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6391


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #22 on: June 23, 2008, 08:09:54 AM »

As was said in the above post, when I was stung, the glove did not rip as it is supposed to when penetrated.

Same here.  I was stung thru a blue one by a bumble bee and the glove stayed in tact.  Although John claims the purple ones are sting proof,  I'm not impressed by his demonstration.  A bee stinger is much smaller in diameter than a needle or knife.  Until I see a picture of a bee trying to sting or better yet get a pair and try to let a bee sting me, I'll remain skeptical.

I only wear them to keep my hand clean when doing removals, so I just buy the cheap latex ones.   Those are definitely NOT sting proof.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


Dick Allen
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 163

Location: Anchorage


« Reply #23 on: June 23, 2008, 11:17:13 AM »

Quote
Some people...think darker colors attract bees. Or that bees...will attack or something. I wear blue jeans and long sleeved blue shirts. The bees don't care.

My sentiments too, Jerry. I wear jeans and dark shirts all the time. The other day I had on black jeans and a black shirt. Another beekeeper told me I looked like Johnny Cash.  Also did NOT have either latex or nitrile gloves on at the time. The bees didn’t mind at all.

Those thin gloves are great though when bees are a bit testy. For the most part the tactile feeling in your fingers is still there while generally protecting you from being stung on the hands.  I have noticed that bees won’t sting either through latex or thin nitrile gloves *nearly as often* as they will on bare hands. I think it might be due to the gloves masking the scent given off my human hands. Even the thin nitrile gloves are NOT sting proof though if the bees are on a rampage.
Logged
randydrivesabus
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1072

Location: Indian Valley, VA


« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2008, 02:45:00 PM »

today was the first time i got stung good through my nitrile gloves so yeah...they can sting through them and pump you full of venom. but this occurred early on in my hive visit and they didn't sting me again afterwards.
Logged
dpence
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 672


Location: Holliday MO


« Reply #25 on: June 24, 2008, 03:23:36 PM »

Like Robo said, I use gloves to keep the propolis off my hands.  I use a pair I found at Walley World in the paint section.  I think they are chemical gloves, they are blue and have a nice lining, fairly tough.  I still go bare handed when I need to feel what I am doing. 

David 
Logged
Keith13
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1763


Location: Baton Rouge, LA


« Reply #26 on: June 27, 2008, 10:35:37 AM »

I think what some are missing is the thickness of the glove yes they are all nitrile but some the green are usually thicker and used as an outer glove while the blue and purple are used as an inner glove when dealing with chemicals so that you will have two layers of protection. so you can think the green are usually heavy duty while blue and purple are light duty, if you will. I se the blue they give great dexterity not the same as if you had nothing on but still pretty good, but don't for a second think you will not be stung through them

Keith
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.803 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page July 24, 2014, 08:49:24 AM
anything