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Author Topic: glue  (Read 1710 times)
tina
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« on: April 23, 2011, 03:53:14 AM »

what is the best glue for hives ?
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Grieth
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« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2011, 04:50:34 AM »

I'm using Titebond III now.  Tried normal liquid nails, but it was a bit messy, too thick in the joints and you can't sand it without the paper getting clogged up.  Titebond III is water proof, unlike Titebond I.  My local supplier told me today that he uses it as well.  I also screw, but most seem to just nail.
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tina
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« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2011, 06:10:49 AM »

thanks
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Lone
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« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2011, 08:11:03 AM »

A wood glue like Aquadhere (not the polyurethane one) is ok or using the paint you paint the hive with makes a good glue too in the joints and helps slow rot.  We tend to use screws too and the glue makes up for the rough bush carpentry.  Try not to glue your bottom boards on like we did  Smiley
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Shanevrr
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« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2011, 08:43:18 AM »

i used Titebond. worked great. very strong
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nella
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« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2011, 11:40:41 AM »

Titebond III, and the glue that squeezes out with my finger I spread on the end grain to prevent water from wicking into the wood.
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Paraplegic Racehorse
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« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2011, 12:09:16 PM »

Historically, I've used Gorilla glue and Titebond II. They both work reasonably well. This year, I'm using marine epoxy, because it's what I have. It's tempting to try some "construction" glues, like PL Premium to see how they hold up.

Per a note on a boat-building list: If you thin construction adhesive and use it like fibreglass resin on your box corners with drywall tape, you can effectively waterproof your corners. I haven't tried this personally, but the guy says he has a wooden boat built like this 30+ years ago and still looks new.
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Lone
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« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2011, 09:01:48 AM »

Sourcing those American glues might be the trouble.  I've never seen Titebond or Gorilla glues.  I see on the Titebond website there is one distributor in Nth Queensland, but I don't know how common it is in retail outlets.  I'll look out for it.

That's a nice idea you have for the edges Para.  Recently my favourite chemical is Paverpol, which is primarily a fabric hardener and waterproofer, but can be used on any porous non plastic substance, such as wood.  It works on polystyrene.

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tina
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« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2011, 04:38:44 PM »

i'll ask the local mitre 10
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BEES4U
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« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2011, 12:44:58 PM »

re:
Glue
We have been using Titebond II by the gallon for several years. it's a very good product!
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E. B. LUCAS APIARIES
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Paraplegic Racehorse
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« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2011, 12:13:01 PM »

Sourcing those American glues might be the trouble.  I've never seen Titebond or Gorilla glues.

These are just brand names of polyurethane glue. There are certainly other brands available to you locally. Try to find the "waterproof" ones - they aren't waterproof in that it's generally not recommended for use on a boat, but they're more than you'll need for beehives.
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I'm Paraplegic Racehorse.
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hardwood
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« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2011, 02:28:38 PM »

Titebond is not polyurethane. All three types of Titebond are good glues with TitebondIII being the most waterproof. They are based on the aliphatic resin platform.

I've been using all three in our custom woodwork shop for years.

Scott
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Paraplegic Racehorse
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« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2011, 01:51:59 PM »

I stand corrected on the chemical makeup of Titebond glue. However, I've seen too many soak-tests to prove that while III may be the best water barrier, II is superior for immersion applications.

Not that this is important for beehives unless you intend to drown them. Smiley

Regardless, glue used in beehives should ideally be of the low-VOC type. Construction adhesives are inexpensive and easy to apply from a caulk dispensing "gun." They can be thinned or thickened, as needed, and spread over some sort of woven material, such as fiberglass or drywall tape to repair broken edges, enhance strength at corners and/or provide water resistance. At US$3-5, brand dependent, per tube able to be used on many boxes, it's a good investment. This is particularly true if you have lots of exposed end-grain (butt-joints) or lots of seepage surface (finger joints) at your box corners. It has the added advantage of reducing your reliance on metal fasteners, if you are one who cares about such things.
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I'm Paraplegic Racehorse.
Member in good standing: International Discordance of Kilted Apiarists, Local #994

The World Beehive Project - I endeavor to build at least one of every beehive in common use today and document the entire process.
Grieth
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« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2011, 09:23:19 PM »

Have you made boxes with glue only?  How have they held up?

I have often wondered whether screws/nails are needed given the weight is on the end boards where the hand holds are, and the strength of modern glues. 
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"The time has come," the walrus said, "to talk of many things:
Of shoes and ships - and sealing wax - of cabbages and kings”
Lewis Carroll
couta77
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« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2011, 06:24:51 AM »

I use marine epoxy and apply it over rebates and end grain. Its expensive but probably the best on the market.  Mind you if you buy it in the large four litre packs its not too bad price wise. I have a boat building background as well.
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Paraplegic Racehorse
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« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2011, 01:44:01 PM »

I have not tried glue-only, but I imagine it will work fine. Enough so that my hives built this year will be held together without metal fasteners. I have not yet decided whether I will dowel components together. I'm not certain if it will add enough strength to be worthwhile. If I do, I'll use bamboo skewers or toothpicks.

Many, many boats are held together with only glue (epoxy, usually) and narrow strips of woven glass fiber. They carry heavy loads and suffer enormous amounts of impact energy from wind and waves. Plenty of tests have been done showing that the glue-seam will take more impact and load stress than the surrounding timber.

I think the real reason to use metal or plastic fasteners in your box corners is the clamping action they provide while the glue cures. A couple bar clamps and some angle iron can become a multi-box gluing jig, and can be reused over and over.
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I'm Paraplegic Racehorse.
Member in good standing: International Discordance of Kilted Apiarists, Local #994

The World Beehive Project - I endeavor to build at least one of every beehive in common use today and document the entire process.
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