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Author Topic: Homemade Frames  (Read 7572 times)
joebrown
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« Reply #20 on: May 08, 2011, 12:20:31 AM »

My main motivation for making frames was to get narrow frames (1 1/4" spacing).  Otherwise, it definitely, in my opinion, is not worth the work.


I totally agree! I bought 300 frames unassembled and vowed not to do that again either. I do not have the time for all that. If you add in the value of your time invested into the frames there is no way it is worth it! If it takes you 2 hours to make 10 frames from scratch and you pay your self $10 an hour, then you have a $20 investment in 10 frames. I can get assembled frames at Brushy Mountain Bee Farm for $1.50 each. That is 15 vs your 20, and I did not even break a sweat!
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #21 on: May 08, 2011, 01:08:15 AM »

I make my top bars 3/4" wide because it's the width of a one by...
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Michael Bush
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rbinhood
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« Reply #22 on: May 08, 2011, 10:51:37 AM »

Here is a couple of pics of the shopbuilt tenion jig that I use to cut the notches in the top and bottom of my ends for my frames it is quite simple to build and is adjustable, so getting the notches centered is very easy.  Once you setup for the top cut make several and then setup for your bottom and do the same.  After you have these done rip each to the desired width then setup your routertable and cut the relief on the sides using your fence with a stop and straight cutting bit, every relief cut will be uniform.  If anyone is interested in building a tenion jig I will work up a set of drawings and instructions to build one, and I will work on getting a video of it in use in the near future.  Also a pic of a foundationless topbar with demensions I use for comb guide and one of a frame end.

OK the links have been added to and earlier post.  There's a couple of the shop built tenion jig, one of a topbar with combguide, and one of a finsihed end.

« Last Edit: May 08, 2011, 05:32:42 PM by rbinhood » Logged

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Tommyt
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« Reply #23 on: May 08, 2011, 12:30:02 PM »

rbinhood

 I'm sure you tried to post pictures (thank you)
But to due so you have to contact a moderator and he will
post it or get you permission to post your own
They keep new people from pictures to keep spaming/porn away

Tommyt
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kbenz
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« Reply #24 on: May 08, 2011, 09:11:41 PM »

I make my top bars 3/4" wide because it's the width of a one by...


how do you make your sides?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #25 on: May 09, 2011, 02:11:36 AM »

I've done a few different things.  I've built the standard hoffman but skinnier (1 1/4" end bars).  I've build like a picture frame sort of things with beveled material and a nail on the side for a spacer.
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Michael Bush
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Haddon
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« Reply #26 on: May 15, 2011, 09:28:46 PM »


Thats one of the home made frames still haven't got to try them out on a cut out yet. Bottom bar was a painted 1x6 I savaged from the neighbor's remodel.
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twintrades
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« Reply #27 on: July 07, 2011, 11:20:56 PM »

I know old thread. But i did a serch and this was the best DIY frame to pop up. Just thought id post a link to some plans. Future DIYers might find it help full. FYI I built some frames and they turnd out great ! used some for my cut out.

http://www.beeclass.com/dts/beeequipment.htm
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bjw27
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« Reply #28 on: August 09, 2011, 02:33:35 PM »

I needed 10 frames fast so I decided to build my own.  The wood from Home Depot cost 19.00. So I am already at 1.90/frame! Of course I bought wood strips that were already the correct dims. and not just a 2x. Plus my time...I think I'm just going to buy a case of 500 from a bee supply next time! rolleyes
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specialkayme
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« Reply #29 on: August 09, 2011, 04:11:49 PM »

I was just wondering what everyone was getting as a cost per frame.

I'd be interested in making my own frames if it was worth the time. But when I can buy them for $0.59 each from Miller Bee Supply, why bother even trying to cut them myself?
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BlueBee
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« Reply #30 on: August 09, 2011, 04:51:43 PM »

Iíve built plenty of frames and I canít think of any good economical reason for building them yourself unless you want to do some non-standard bee keeping.  Iím contrary, like to experiment, and like some of the ideas I hear for alternative ways of doing things.  Things such as narrow frame bee keeping, large comb beekeeping, and custom queen mating nucs. 

A side benefit of custom frames is you can get creative with the designs and not follow the old Hoffman design.  Frames are a lot simpler to make when you donít try to copy a machine.  I really like Roboís frame spacing idea and have been using that in my custom experiments.  There is SO much less propolis problems between the frames using Roboís push pin ideas.  A lot less bees get squished as well.

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blainenay
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« Reply #31 on: December 15, 2011, 02:42:10 AM »

So has anyone tried making their own frames?

I use a design I got as a teen some 50 years ago from my 4-H beekeeping club leader. It's not self-spacing, but it's easy to make.

I'm too new to this forum to be allowed to post URLs, but you can go to my website and look under "Hives and Equipment" for "Langstroth Frames (Simplified)" to find plans for these simplified frames.
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rwurster
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« Reply #32 on: December 16, 2011, 10:41:23 PM »

I've always made my own frames.  I run out batches of deep/medium frames that have 7/8" top bars and 1 1/4" thick end bars.  They're not quite standard but they work well in my foundationless setups.  I make them all out of recycled wood so there's relatively little cost involved and it gives me something to do during the winter.  The real trick though is to make them 200 - 300 at a time.  I crank out about 100 standard width frames for mediums and deeps also.
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Apis_M_Rescue
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« Reply #33 on: December 18, 2011, 11:21:04 PM »

So has anyone tried making their own frames?


I use a design I got as a teen some 50 years ago from my 4-H beekeeping club leader. It's not self-spacing, but it's easy to make.

I'm too new to this forum to be allowed to post URLs, but you can go to my website and look under "Hives and Equipment" for "Langstroth Frames (Simplified)" to find plans for these simplified frames.


Thanks for mentioning your site. Its quite a comprehensive website. Hopefully this Langstroth Frames Simplified link you mentioned comes through here. It is indeed simple to where a shop challenged guy as myself could even make.

David aka AMR
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