Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 20, 2014, 07:47:04 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: requeen a swarm?  (Read 1266 times)
dp
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 80

Location: Southern Oregon


« on: April 24, 2011, 11:11:48 PM »

Not very clear on swarms.  Got two swarms this week.  Isn't the queen that leaves with a swarm an "old" queen?  Is it best to requeen that hive as soon as possible, or do you let the bees take care of that?  Maybe you just keep and eye on it and see how the new queen lays eggs?
Logged
hardwood
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3482


Location: Osteen, Fl (just south of Daytona)

Alysian Apiaries youtube.com/MrBeedude


« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2011, 11:45:46 PM »

Let her go until you know that she needs a good pinching!

Scott
Logged

"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13967


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2011, 04:57:08 AM »

>Not very clear on swarms.  Got two swarms this week.  Isn't the queen that leaves with a swarm an "old" queen?

The first swarm.  Yes.  The next one, no.

> Is it best to requeen that hive as soon as possible, or do you let the bees take care of that?

I never do.

>  Maybe you just keep and eye on it and see how the new queen lays eggs?

Odds are the bees will replace her soon enough if she needs to be.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
jaseemtp
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 327


Location: Weatherford Texas USA


« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2011, 11:43:21 AM »

I have been catching swarms this month and I have not requeened any of them.  Now I did get on 6 days ago and they are freaking grumpy bees.  I will requeen this have this week, that is if I can even find her.  I am not 100% certain that she is in there.
Logged

"It's better to die upon your feet than to live upon your knees!" Zapata
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8186

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2011, 08:03:28 PM »

Never waste a good queen now.    The hive will replace her if needed.   Or you can replace her in the fall during your requeening with the rest of your hives. 
Logged
ordka
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4

Location: Farmington, UT


« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2011, 07:44:09 PM »

My Neighbor, fellow beekeeper, had an extra queen coming tomorrow and asked me if I wanted to requeen the swarm we picked up a month ago.  I had intended to requeen it later in the summer or fall, but thought it a good opportunity to do it.  I got into the hive this morning and after looking at every frame found her and pinched her.  I left her in the bottom of the hive.  The new queen should arrive tomorrow.  I have seen so many different opinions on how long to wait until putting the new queen in, it is really just up to the individual beekeeper.  I am just waiting 24 hrs before putting the queen in.  I felt pretty bad pinch the old queen.  She seemed to be doing okay.  lots of capped brood an larva...although I think the lay patterns was a bit sporadic.  I am crossing my fingers that they will take well to the new queen.
Logged
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15319


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2011, 08:26:00 PM »

don't think i would have left her, but.....

i don't replace swarm queens.  i don't see any reason to kill any queen that's doing a good job and the hive is not nasty.  + my goal is to keep survivor hives.  most of the time you don't know where a swarm comes from, but you do know it didn't come out of a package  Wink

i don't see any reason to rush the release of a queen.  i have even been known to forget that i put one in there....for a week or so.....

Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13967


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2011, 08:07:53 AM »

Overnight is perfect.  I would just put her in a nuc.  You never know when you'll wish you had a laying queen around.  Delivery of queens is iffy at best.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
jaseemtp
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 327


Location: Weatherford Texas USA


« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2011, 10:44:09 PM »

I agree, I would not have left the old queen in the hive.  I also would have moved her to a nuc with a frame or two of bees.  If you have the space to add a nuc.
Logged

"It's better to die upon your feet than to live upon your knees!" Zapata
Danger Brown
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Wiley, Colorado


« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2011, 12:50:35 AM »

I'd feel pretty guilty too about pinching a queen. Haven't done it yet beeing I'm fairly new. But I certainly don't like the thought of it.
Logged
ordka
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4

Location: Farmington, UT


« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2011, 10:36:39 AM »

Update - the hive took well to the new queen.   I got in last night and saw eggs and very busy bees.
Logged
yockey5
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 677


Location: Hudson, Indiana


« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2011, 11:24:01 AM »

I hived a swarm last month and the queen is doing very poorly, although she is a good looker. They have capped brood that is looking very good, but very little larvae, and absolutely NO eggs. She will be pinched next Tues., and replaced next Weds.
Logged
ordka
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4

Location: Farmington, UT


« Reply #12 on: June 23, 2011, 11:55:33 AM »

Yep.  Sounds like the time for a good pinch.  Good Luck!
Logged
Danger Brown
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 58


Location: Wiley, Colorado


« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2011, 12:37:56 PM »

Good job Ordka!
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.215 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page December 12, 2014, 05:33:46 PM
anything