Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 26, 2014, 02:15:04 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Hive site location recommendation  (Read 616 times)
wisnewbee
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 42


Location: Wausau, Wisconsin, USA


« on: March 29, 2011, 12:34:44 PM »

Wisnewbee here again with another question.
In selecting a site for my new hive I have narrowed it down to a couple of choices with one being what I believe to be the best location. I'd like to again tap into the extensive knowledge pool to finalize my selection.
Here's the setup I have. I live on a working dairy farm, but it's not my farm. Cry The front of the house faces due South. The driveway and garage are on the West side of the house. The barn and animals are also on the West side of the house. The North side is the backyard and oversees a large Ag field. It will be field corn the next 2-3 years, then will rotate to alfalfa for 3-5 years. The East side of the house adjoins a grass pasture of about 3 acres. Can't put the hives in the pasture. There may be sheep in there during the summer. Don't ask why. huh I could put the 2 hives in the front against the house, but this would put the hives in the shade for several hours each morning, and again in the evening because I'm so far North. 1 hive may also shadow the other hive. The second site is on the East side of the house. This location would result in the hives being in shade for second half of the day. It would shade then during the hottest time of the day however. I'm not overly concerned about the heat. Summer of 2009 we never had a day over 89 degrees. The third site, and the one I am leaning towards is about 50 yards from the back of the house in a Northeast direction. There is a larger Hemlock (pine) tree near there. I would face the hive entrances to the East (towards the corn field). This would provide for the earliest morning sun, and sun for most of the day. I can position the hive so the shadow of the Hemlock tree moves through the hive area during the hottest parts of the day. The downside of this location is exposure to the North and Northwest winter winds. If I put up a windblock, it will only cause the heavy snowfall to drift at the hives. I do have an alternative site out in the "back forty", about a 1/4 mile away, but if the snow is deep you can't make it back there without snowshoes. I would also have to deal with the very real possibilities of bears and raccoons. We do have bears here, wolves too. The "back forty" location does offer select shade and protection from the winds. It's up against a wooded area. Woods on three sides. What do you recommend? Please play nice when you answer. Thanks.
Wisnewbee
« Last Edit: March 30, 2011, 10:47:56 AM by wisnewbee » Logged
wisnewbee
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 42


Location: Wausau, Wisconsin, USA


« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2011, 12:36:37 PM »

FYI, I think the best location choice is the one to the Northwest of the backyard, near the Hemlock tree. Should have told you that in my post. Sorry.

Wisnewbee
Logged
danno
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2237


Location: Ludington, Michigan


« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2011, 12:54:10 PM »

as far north as we are I dont think twice about heat in the summer but full sun in the winter makes a big difference in survival.  Not sure if you have to worry about bears over there but here I do.  For this reason I pic spots near dwellings.  If I have a choise I pick afternoon sun over morning.  I know many will say morning gets them working earlier but I have found that they handle winter much better with afternoon sun and getting started earlier doesn't matter if there dead in spring.  I pick spots that are high and dry not low and damp.  I do like west and north wind breaks but not at the expence of afternoon sun. For this reason most of the wind breaks are just low bushes
Logged
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2011, 01:04:19 PM »

Me thinks you've already decided and I think it 'may' (?) be the right one Wink.  As for the concern over creating snow drifts, that can only be a blessing in Wisconsin (I cover my hives with as much snow as nature provides me), particularly if using top entrances.  Personally I wouldn't want my hives further away than I could see them from a window of my house, again, that's just me.  On the other hand, you'll be looking up into that hemlock constantly for windfall branches every time the wind blows.

I guess all sites have there pros and cons but I've always prefered an area that gets alot of sunshine, especially early sunshine (a beek can always figure a way to shade a hive if it gets too hot) and sunshine during winter is desirable if not neccessary in Wisconsin.

thomas
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
wisnewbee
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 42


Location: Wausau, Wisconsin, USA


« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2011, 01:31:40 PM »

Oh we have bears here alright. I've got the paw castings and pictures too. Raccoons can be a real problem sometimes. I'm not concerned about having to snowshoe back there, we do it all the time. I'm concerned about damage to the hives. A 200-400 pound bruin would make short work of my hives.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.211 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page July 22, 2014, 09:15:11 PM