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Author Topic: Help on improving my 'orchard'  (Read 1793 times)
VolunteerK9
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« on: March 16, 2011, 10:41:07 AM »

Over the past couple of weeks, Ive given my 3 peach trees some company. I added some blueberry bushes, 3 Fuji apple trees, and a pink plum tree. Somebody give me an idea on what else to add that's both good for me to munch on and bee beneficial. I was thinking of a pear tree but not real sure on which variety. (Soft and juicy would be my preference) I have room for probably 3 more trees and a grapevine or two.
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bulldog
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2011, 06:29:41 PM »

only thing i can say is, plant whatever you and your family like to eat. i'm sure the bees will like any kind of fruit or berry blossoms. just remember some fruit trees are not self-pollinating so you may need to plant two of each and possibly they might need to be of different varieties.
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don2
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« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2011, 01:14:54 AM »

Black Berries/Blue Berries, good wines we brew. rolleyes shocked Wink :)don2
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Bee Happy
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« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2011, 03:59:54 AM »

We have blueberries that were growing here before we moved in. I was gonna post a picture of a bee interacting with a blueberry blossom, but I never could catch the shot. - the blueberry blossom looks a little like a  glass lampshade, where it gets narrow at the opening. The bumblebees have to set the blueberry up for the honeybees. The flower's about 1/3 of an inch and the bumble cuts a slit in the base of about 1/8", then the bee hunts around for the cut and pokes her way in through there - If I think of it I'll try to catch a picture this year.
as to your request - we just planted a self pollinating plum this year - I didn't see the bees working it, but that doesn't really mean they weren't (our peach trees are self pollinating, but the bees still get all over them.)
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VolunteerK9
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« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2011, 02:47:13 PM »

I have heard that crab apple trees are good for pollination trees. If so I'll plant one of those specifically for that purpose. Yeah, my bees wear out the peach trees.
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bulldog
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« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2011, 04:23:14 PM »

yes, i've heard the same thing about crabapples. i've been meaning to get one or two myself and haven't gotten around to it yet.
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kathyp
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« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2011, 05:25:50 PM »

we have several Japanese pear-apple trees.  the fruit is very good and the bees love them.  we have many varieties of apple.  all seem to attract the bees.  all the berries are winners.  cherries, pears, plums, etc. all work.

if you are not sure what kind of pear to get, try a grafted tree and you can have several.  then if you like one, you can plant just that type next year.

dwarfs are always a good choice if you don't have tons of space and they are easier to keep pruned and stuff.
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VolunteerK9
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« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2011, 10:28:55 AM »

Thanks for all the info. After having my peach trees for about 6 years or so, I have finally figured out how to prune them. (Not a great pruning job, but at least a decent one) Ive got the room to expand- just dont know why it took me so long to do it.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2011, 12:00:37 AM »

I dug up my Gooseberries because they were crowding the tractor lane.  I started with 4 Gooseberry and 2 Current plants.  I ended up with 9 Gooseberry and 3 Currants.  I then gave my younger brother a batch of roots to sprout.
My granddaughters are girl scouts.  They needed a place to plant some Chestnut seedlings so I've marked where they go.  Last year I got a Cherry sapling.  Free, which is the best kind of tree.
2 of my sheep I got free a Cheviot ram and a Dark Romney ewe.  4H'ers who outgrew the organization.  I have one lamb from a yearling ewe I bought and the free ewe is due any day.  The ram, who is 13 years old will go for mutton in a month or so and the 9 year old ewe will follow in the fall after the lamb is weaned.

Free trees, free sheep, means free food.
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VolunteerK9
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« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2011, 02:18:23 PM »

  The ram, who is 13 years old will go for mutton in a month or so and the 9 year old ewe will follow in the fall after the lamb is weaned.


Ive contemplated buying some hair sheep...no wool to shear but plenty of nice lamb chops and shanks. Mmmm mmm good
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