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Author Topic: First hive  (Read 3035 times)
NeilTheCop
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« on: March 11, 2011, 08:27:40 AM »

My very first hive is almost ready, but I have a couple of questions about the top bars.
I followed the original instructions and my bars are 24mm X 9mm X long enough to slot into the rebate with a little bit of wriggle room.
My questions are: is there any need to positively locate the top bars in any way?

And I saw a YouTube video showing the making of beeswax strips about 1inch wide which were put into groves in the top bar as a foundation. Is there any advantage to doing this?
I was wondering if just the groove in the top bar with wax melted into it might have the same encouraging effect on the bees.

Sorry I can't post the direct links.
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Merlinspop
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« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2011, 09:16:28 AM »

Neil -  Not sure what you mean by "positively locate" your top bars.  If you mean to secure them in place, then no, not really.  The bees will glue them in pretty well, which you'll need to break free to do inspections, manipulations, etc.

With respect to your other question, there's a wide range of opinions about how to best prepare the bars for the bees to draw proper comb.  While some use nothing at all, most agree that some sort of guide is important to have.  Choices are many, from melting beeswax onto a string stretched down the center of the bar, to cutting a groove down the bar and filling that with any of melted wax, Popsicle sticks, wax foundation, etc., to milling the bar itself so that it tapers down to a point (sort of like an upside down triangle when viewed from the end).   I took length of cove moulding and fixed them to the bars.  I'll see how well that works in about a month when my package moves in.

Good luck!

B
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trentfysty
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« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2011, 12:00:21 PM »

My very first hive is almost ready, but I have a couple of questions about the top bars.
I followed the original instructions and my bars are 24mm X 9mm X long enough to slot into the rebate with a little bit of wriggle room.
My questions are: is there any need to positively locate the top bars in any way?

And I saw a YouTube video showing the making of beeswax strips about 1inch wide which were put into groves in the top bar as a foundation. Is there any advantage to doing this?
I was wondering if just the groove in the top bar with wax melted into it might have the same encouraging effect on the bees.

Sorry I can't post the direct links.

What type of hive did you build? If it's a horizontal top bar there is no need to secure the bars. If its a warre you can just use little tacks to make sure the bars stay put and preserve the space between bars until the bees glue them in. I use spacers in my warres and it works well.

How you prepar the bars is really personal opinion. I use a groove in the bar and melt wax into it for my warres and for my top bar I have a wedge on the bottom for the bars that I cover with melted wax. Both methods have worked well for me.

Good luck with the new hive!
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2011, 09:30:26 AM »

If they are 24 mm there will have to be a gap between them of at least 8mm or they will be too close.  Most top bar hives have only a top bar and no gap,  unless it's a warre.

I recommend either a wood strip or a wood triangle.  I would not wax them and I would not trust a groove filled with wax.

http://bushfarms.com/beesfoundationless.htm#whichguide
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Michael Bush
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NeilTheCop
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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2011, 02:31:10 PM »

I cant post the link to youtube directly. But the address for the videos is:
(Change the xxx to www)
xxx.youtube.com/watch?v=31ovKSO-v4g
xxx.youtube.com/watch?v=ai08ludKmRM

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Tommyt
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2011, 07:28:10 AM »

Beeswax strips for Warré top bar beehives this is the title on youtube link
 I think one of you are talking KTBH a Kenya Top Bar
This is your full address
Beeswax strips for Warré top bar beehives

###############################################
2nd address
Wasatch Warre - Frame Spacing
Also a Warre' Hive
That is being discussed
The other posts are both Kenya TBH
And Warre' They are NOT the same
Wasatch Warre - Frame Spacing


 I think you should maybe explain which one you are talking about
I do believe its a warrre and sorry I no Zero about them other than reading
Look here you'll see a small KTBH much different than WARRE'
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,30070.0.html

Tommyt
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NeilTheCop
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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2011, 01:19:04 PM »

Sorry to be so vague.
I'm building a Warre hive, and as you can see from the second video the top bars are positively located with small nails. And the fist video shows using wax strips as a foundation on the bars. Are either of these steps nessesary? huh
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trentfysty
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« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2011, 07:38:02 PM »

The gap between the bars is very important as that is how the bees will move from box to box. I just use little spacers between bars without attaching the bars themselves. That seems to work really well for me. As far as wax, I cut a groove once saw blade wide down the center of the bar. I then fill that groove with wax and that works well in my Warre hives.



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NeilTheCop
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« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2011, 12:23:48 PM »

Thanks for that.
I made a grove on each bar as you said, and I'll pick up some wax this week.
One final question. In all the literature about the Warre hive they say use burlap on the quilt. Has anyone used fiberglass or aluminum window screen?
As both are inert, and I can get screening far easier than burlap, could anyone foresee any problems?
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Buz Green
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« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2011, 02:40:52 PM »


I drill 1/16 holes in the top bar and into the rabbet in the box and then align them with #18/1" nails.  It keeps them in place while you manipulate the boxes during spring installation and they are easy to remove for the fall harvest.
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trentfysty
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« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2011, 12:38:33 PM »

Has anyone used fiberglass or aluminum window screen?

Yes, I have used screen on the warre hives. The first issue is that the bees will chew the fiberglass screen so aluminum is best for use. I use a piece of aluminum screen cut to lay over the top bars on the upper most box. I still use burlap for the quilt as that is supposed to help with wicking away moisture from the hive. I have found that the screen works better than the flour coated burlap as my bees kept chewing the flour burlap and then the quilt causing wood chips to end up in the hive. Once I switched to screen they no longer chewed through and ventilation seems to be good. I haven't seen my bees bearding and there are not any moisture problems in my hives.
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VolunteerK9
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« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2011, 02:02:07 PM »

Those are pretty neat videos, but personally I think all that work is overkill. All they need is a straight guide in the middle of your bars as a reference. That can be a piece of molding, 1 inch strips of foundation, a glued in popsicle stick, etc. The bees can attach the wax to the bars far better than we can, so I wouldnt go through the trouble of doing it for them and it being a potential fail point.
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NeilTheCop
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« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2011, 09:19:50 PM »

I'd like to thank everyone for their sage advice.
I have everything ready, just waiting for the bees to arrive  grin
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VolunteerK9
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« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2011, 12:19:32 PM »

I'd like to thank everyone for their sage advice.
I have everything ready, just waiting for the bees to arrive  grin

Come on tell the truth,reminiscent of the kid waiting on Christmas day isn't it?
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NeilTheCop
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« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2011, 09:10:43 AM »

Worst.
I can't sneak down at 2am and have a peek evil
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DavesBees
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« Reply #15 on: May 14, 2011, 11:32:41 AM »

Neil,
I the bees coming has ever been stung by the cops; the install might not go very well for you. grin
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Jim 134
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« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2011, 12:27:08 PM »


Wasatch Warre - Frame Spacing
Also a Warre' Hive
That is being discussed
The other posts are both Kenya TBH
And Warre' They are NOT the same
Wasatch Warre - Frame Spacing
 
Tommyt


  At 1.03 he say 12mm is the same as 3/8" it is not 1" is about 25.4 mm more like
8.5 mm just my $0.02


   BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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